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Just recently a question of mine was down-voted. I posted this quite a long time ago. I feel that it was a valid question. I presented a problem and asked a specific question. I did research before posting, but did not indicate so.

I am not so concerned with the loss of rep. I do want to understand what I did wrong however. I have read https://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask and do not think that I have deviated from the guidelines. Could someone please help me to understand this?


This also makes me think that it is too easy to down-vote. I often see that questions are down-voted without any explanation from the down-voter. This does not help the OP understand what they did wrong. Earlier tonight, I saw this behavior on this question. The question was valid, but a variation of it had been asked before. It is a shame that the down-voter did not point this out.

So, is it too easy to down-vote?

  • Perhaps comments should be required when down-voting?
  • Perhaps a higher rep should be required - currently I think it is only 125.

marked as duplicate by Infinite Recursion, Martijn Pieters, ivarni, Martin Tournoij, Louis Dec 9 '14 at 10:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Nice. A down-vote without a comment. :-) – EJK Dec 9 '14 at 5:39
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    Canonical reference for the once-a-week question about requiring comments for downvotes: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/135/… . See also: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/250177/… , from yesterday: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/278664/… , and on and on. – Brad Larson Dec 9 '14 at 5:44
  • Fair enough, but this was not a "once-a-week question about requiring comments for down votes". That was just one of two suggestions. Shame on me for not searching on this. However I also (a) posted another suggestion, (b) initially asked what was wrong with a specific question. – EJK Dec 9 '14 at 5:47
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    It's a single downvote, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Sometimes people lose their keys. – Brad Larson Dec 9 '14 at 5:50
  • I'm not worried about a single down-vote, just trying to understand what I can do to improve and what are the expectations of StackOverflow. – EJK Dec 9 '14 at 5:52
  • That "lose their keys" link is good BTW. – EJK Dec 9 '14 at 5:53
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    what I can do to improve and what are the expectations of StackOverflow? With 236 posts on Stack Overflow and only 1 posts with a negative score, you seem to be already on top of expectations, I believe. – Aziz Shaikh Dec 9 '14 at 6:24
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I didn't downvote, and don't have the mind reading skills to know why somebody did. But if you're interested in concerns that people might have with the question, I see a couple:

  • When I started reading the question, it sounded like you were going to ask for a library recommendation. Which I'm sure you're well aware is Off Topic. The first couple of paragraphs, you're describing how you're considering a library, but aren't sure if it's a good choice. The question ends up taking a different turn, but you can't count on everybody reading the whole thing.
  • The question is overall somewhat vague. What is "many devices" for you? And what's a "vast majority"? It's not clear how a good answer for this question would look.
  • At least in the strict sense, somebody could argue that it's not a programming question, and is therefore not a good fit for SO. It's more about the market share of different CPU architectures.

But in the big picture, I completely agree with what @AzizShaikh said in a comment. Based on the record you have with your questions and answers, I think you're doing just fine. While it's great to have high standards, and wanting every question/answer to be a success, there's no reason to worry too much about one question that gets one downvote.

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