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I am a hobbyist programmer which means I am mostly an avid READER of stackoverflow and not a contributor. 99% of my problems with my code I can solve by searching in google and in 90% of those I end up here at SO, finding a similar question to the one I have and I can almost always find a solution, if not ready to use, almost, requiring some adaptation that I am able to do.

Because I find most of the answers I need, I almost never felt the need to ask. Why ask what has been already asked so many times and has good solutions?

SO has been invaluable for my hobby for many years now but only recently I decided to finally create an account - I finally had something to ask. And now, as I keep on finding questions and answers that help me a lot, as I try to click the UP arrow to let the contributor know that s/he helped someone else, I cannot because it requires 15 minimum reputation. Not to mention to make a comment, which I wanted 2-3 times already, but that requires 50 reputation.

Why SO has these high minimum requirements if getting reputation is so hard? I really would like to show those who help me some consideration by "upping" them.

ADDENDUM: as I tried to post this question, the first tag that crossed my mind was the tag "reputation" that sums up well what this question is about. I used it but then I could not proceed. I just found that creating a new tag (it seems nobody ever used 'reputation' as a tag here) requires the astounding minimum of 1500 reputation! This is ironic...

migrated from stackoverflow.com Dec 4 '14 at 21:04

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

  • 5
    Getting reputation isn't that hard if you answer a couple of questions with satisfactory answers. Basically having that minimum is a decent enough filter to users on the site. – DejaVuSansMono Dec 4 '14 at 20:57
  • 9
    This question being posted to Stack Overflow instead of [meta] is evidence that the (rather low) rep requirements work as designed. You don't yet know how to use the site – and that's okay! But we're giving you bumpers to assist you in using the site while you learn. – Matt Ball Dec 4 '14 at 21:01
  • You can also get reputation from good suggested edits. Answering is much faster of course :) Also thank you for not posting duplicate questions! – BradleyDotNET Dec 4 '14 at 21:07
  • 1
    Skimming through your questions, these are all quite low quality by means of the SO policies how to ask questions. – πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 4 '14 at 21:12
  • 1
    "the first tag that crossed my mind was the tag "reputation" As you see reputation is well existing on Meta SO, but not on the main site, since it's an irrelevant tag there. – πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 4 '14 at 21:15
  • If you never have the need to ask, you can still always answer. I have only asked questions twice, and one of those questions was a self-answer down the road, but I make sure to pitch in on questions that I can answer. At about 100 reputation, which is basically 10 answers with 1 upvote, you have everything you really need for the website. A decent answer can get you even 30 or 40 reputation really quickly, and it's not hard to reach that level. – Compass Dec 4 '14 at 21:17
  • Beyond the help center we have a load of tips and tricks and treats – rene Dec 4 '14 at 21:20
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    It only takes one or two non-terrible answers to get 2 upvotes up to +21, which is more than enough to begin voting. Find a tag you're interested in and add it to your favorite tags. Watch the questions for an hour or so and jump in to answer one. If you've been reading a while, you know what kind of answers are worthy of upvotes, and you'll very likely get a few votes. It can be very intimidating, but is an easy bump to get past. – Michael Berkowski Dec 4 '14 at 21:22
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It cuts out the noise. You're just going to have to spend some time answering questions to get some reputation.

  • 4
    Not entirely true. Though asking and answering are the ways most people with high reputation got there, it is possible to get to 2,000 reputation by making good suggested edits to posts (by good I mean ones that get accepted by reviewers of the suggested edit review queue). Each accepted suggested edit gains 2 reputation - so, though slow, far from impossible. – Oded Dec 4 '14 at 21:20
  • making random suggested edits to posts (by random I mean ones that get accepted by reviewers of the suggested edit review queue). Fixed that for ya ;) – LittleBobbyTables Dec 4 '14 at 21:31
-2

Reputation primarily grants you increased abilities to moderate the site. Doesn't it make sense that those who invest in the value of the site by creating valuable content should be the ones to moderate the site?

It's so hard to contribute to SO over a period of a month and not end up with 100 reputation that I'm finding it hard to understand what precisely to wish to do with reputation that can't easily be earned from your peers. It sure seems like the system is working as designed to let people who want to read and lurk do so without being bothered to affect the site and thereby earn the reputation needed to start voting to moderate and filter content.

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Also, even non "voting" users can submit anonymous feedback that in bulk does sway what posts are featured and shown so that you can practice and affect the site even before you are granted voting privileges.

  • 3
    What feedback are you referring to? You can't do much as an anonymous user. – BradleyDotNET Dec 4 '14 at 21:08
  • @BradleyDotNET I didn't realize people were unaware of the feedback mechanism for anonymous non-voting feedback. I've added a screen shot and you can test it using a private window in any modern browser. – bmike Dec 4 '14 at 21:30
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    Are you aware that the message in question means that no vote was actually cast? Its saying you need an account to vote (and then it still won't work until you have 15 rep). – BradleyDotNET Dec 4 '14 at 21:33
  • @BradleyDotNET What makes you think I'm not aware of the difference between voting and feedback? Also, keep the down votes coming :-) I've never had a post worthy of -10 yet but am hoping this one could become that controversial. – bmike Dec 4 '14 at 22:45
  • I think you are not aware of that because you said: "Also, even non "voting" users can submit anonymous feedback that in bulk does sway what posts are featured and shown". The dialog that supposedly backs up your claim does no such thing. It doesn't change the vote count (which is what affects posts being featured/shown on the home page). It does absolutely nothing besides tell the person trying to leave feedback that they need an account. Now, I don't work at SE, so they could be tracking/using those clicks, but that is so prone to abuse that I wouldn't believe it unless they told me. – BradleyDotNET Dec 4 '14 at 22:54
  • @BradleyDotNET anonymous feedback has been around since July 2011 - cheers! – bmike Dec 4 '14 at 23:20
  • While that is very interesting, that feature doesn't exist anymore (just verified). They also didn't do anything with it (yet). I will admit that there is the possibility that they are using it, but given the lack of the feature even existing today; I doubt it. Just saying its a bit strong to say that anonymous users can sway things on the site when there is little evidence to support that claim. – BradleyDotNET Dec 4 '14 at 23:33
-2

Here is my opinion on the reputation requirement.

Reputation requirements for up/down vote makes sense (to me) Up/Down votes improve credibility of the answer - so you want "reputed" members controlling that. I get it.

But a comment is just a comment. Why should comment require minimum reputation ? (which is higher than reputation required to up/down vote) Recently, I had to "add an answer" cause I couldn't comment (not enough "cred") Since my "answer" was in the form of a comment on specific "answer" - my answer won't get any up votes. Thus I still don't get additional "cred"

I came here looking for "why" of this requirement, but didn't find very good answer (Yes, @enl8enmentnow mentioned "It cuts noise" - which is obvious, but was looking for "better" answer)

  • 4
    "Why should comment require minimum reputation?" - Because spam; which is easily detectable when posted as a question, almost as easily detectable when posted as an answer, and very hard to detect when posted as a comment. The required rep is higher than for _up_voting (note downvotes require 125 rep, which is considerably higher) because upvoting good content is the foundation on which the whole site is built. And please don't post comments as answers, that's heavily frowned upon. 50 rep is not that much, you can earn it by doing 25 good edits - then you will be able to comment everywhere. – l4mpi Jan 15 '15 at 9:09

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