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This question already has an answer here:

I think users that have high enough reputation should unlock a privilege that allows them to accept an answer on a question that has a correct answer (to be determined by the person accepting it) but the OP did not accept. There would have to be rules to using this privilege, such as waiting a certain amount of time after the question had been asked.

This would help when looking for answers on the site, especially when all of the answers are around the same amount of up votes. Perhaps there could be a flag that allows lower reputation users to flag an answer they've tested to be correct but has not been accepted yet?

Could something like this help?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå, Martijn Pieters, The Guy with The Hat, πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 26 '14 at 18:18

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  • Look at this – Spikatrix Nov 26 '14 at 15:59
  • 4 downvotes, really? I didn't realize this was that bad of a question. Can someone explain why? I can delete it, but I thought it was a decent question. – Jeremy W Nov 26 '14 at 16:00
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    @JeremyW Downvotes on meta can mean disagreement. Most likely people are disagreeing with your feature request. – Louis Nov 26 '14 at 16:00
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    @JeremyW This is approximately the one millionth time (within a rounding error) this functionality has been requested. Do your research before requesting a feature. – Servy Nov 26 '14 at 16:00
  • @Louis that makes sense – Jeremy W Nov 26 '14 at 16:02
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    Accepting an answer is only intended to mean that the OP found it the most useful. That doesn't guarantee, and shouldn't be considered to indicate, anything about it's actual quality. Upvotes are the metric that you should be using for that; if multiple answers all have a similar number of upvotes it's because the community's general opinion is that they're all of roughly equal quality (or hardly anybody has seen the question and its answers). – Anthony Grist Nov 26 '14 at 16:04
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    @Servy My bad, I looked through the related questions when I asked it and couldn't find it. I do make an attempt to ask good questions that aren't duplicates. Guess I messed up here. – Jeremy W Nov 26 '14 at 16:04
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    @Louis Yikes! I didn't realize that users on Meta were quite this brutal :-( I'm sure this isn't the intended consequence but it's kind of scared me off from participating here, which is unfortunate because I am a long-time user of StackExchange and would have liked to participate here in order to both be a better User and to make the communities even more useful. – Chaya Cooper Feb 16 '15 at 17:57
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You already have a tool to indicate that you feel an answer is helpful when you weren't the one who asked the question. An upvote.

  • clicking upvote yeah, great tool :) – nicael Nov 26 '14 at 15:59
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    The Q is about allowing users with X rep to accept answer on someone else's behalf, not about how can we show an answer is helpful. Accepted is different to an upvote, different rep, and signifies the answer helped the OP directly. Upvotes can signify it was a good answer for various reasons, and can be from someone other than OP, currently accepted cannot, as per the proposal. – James Nov 26 '14 at 16:28
  • @James Yes, they are different, and the upvote is the appropriate tool for the job he is trying to accomplish. Those differences are exactly why it's the right tool for this job. – Servy Nov 26 '14 at 16:30
  • "the upvote is the appropriate tool for the job he is trying to accomplish" you said yourself they're different. Upvote = it helped the upvoter, and, it might not have actually answered the question particularly well or directly - we allow "other/relevant" info in answers if it's a possibly different approach (etc). Whereas, Accepted = it was a good "direct" answer to the question. The two signify different things. – James Nov 26 '14 at 16:35
  • @James "...and signifies the answer helped the OP directly." And that is exactly why only the OP can accept, and other users use the up arrow next to the post. "... it was a good "direct" answer to the question." Not always. The best answer isn't always the accepted one, especially for lower rep OPs. Servy's answer is right here, we have a tool for higher-rep users to indicate the usefulness of the answer: The upvote. – Kendra Nov 26 '14 at 16:36
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    @James Answers need to answer the question. If the answer doesn't even try to answer the question then it is Not An Answer and should be flagged as such. Related information that doesn't answer the question should be posted as a comment. Acceptance is simply a super upvote for the post author; it's given slightly more weight as it is their question, and doesn't have a rep requirement. It doesn't fundamentally mean something different. You might personally choose to use them differently, but they're not actually any different. – Servy Nov 26 '14 at 16:37
  • You're putting words in my mouth. I never said "doesn't try to answer" I said "doesn't very well" and "not directly". eg - A question in PHP about how to send data to the next page, and the OP stating "I heard about POST will this work". The Q might have two perfectly decent answers, one about $_POST and the other $_SESSION. both could be upvoted by many users, or none,. etc. Upvotes don't signify which the OP decided was the better answer for them, an accepted answer does. – James Nov 26 '14 at 16:44
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    @James The OP is entirely within their rights to accept an answer that doesn't answer the question well, or directly, if that's what they want to accept. It is no different from any other upvote in that respects; it's only difference is that it is from the OP. It is their super upvote. – Servy Nov 26 '14 at 16:47
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I think the main issue with this, among with a few others, is it should be up to the OP to decide if it helped them directly or not.

While others can determine if an answer directly answers a question, the OP should have the privilege of deciding who deserves the tick/rep/etc based on the fact it is them who asked the question.

Also, touching on some of the other issues, who gets the rep for accepting an answer?
If a user other than the OP gets it, then we'd have answers being accepted willy-nilly from rep hunters.
Also, what happens when two or more answers are arguably the same or as good as each other, but slightly different approach? Only the OP can accept based on merit, really, and this does occur a fair bit.

Adding something from the comments:
Community deciding is going to be based on what we already have - net votes by community, and answers are already stacked based on net votes. Essentially, without an accepted answer, community already have an accepted answer - the highest voted one. So accepting an answer is just a questioner's privilege, and I see no solution to the questioner not awarding it, certainly not via community. We are arguably better off leaving "best answer" being determined by total votes - so left open to continuous community voting, rather than locking it down at some period in time

  • How about appointing rep to the person who provided the answer but taking some away from the third party who accepted the answer ( maybe offering some other kind of reward like a badge for xx third party accepted answers ) of course this would require a constraint of not being able to accept your own answer. I have seen too many questions with high quality answers that are sitting there 2 weeks later with no answer . – Damian Nikodem Feb 26 '15 at 0:30
  • @DamianNikodem I know, I see old questions with many good answers where questioner has not accepted one. It is annoying. But I still think that the "green tick" is specifically something for the OP to decide - it's their privilege because it's their question. Of course, it's arguably not their question, it's community's, however up votes are community's privilege to show which answer community feels is the better one. – James Feb 26 '15 at 20:18
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    Prior to becoming a user here ( I have only been posting for a month h when I came across SO via Google I would simply scroll to the accepted answer and ignore all the others . I think that if a poster abandons a question for a significant amount of time ( let's say 1 or 2 weeks ) and there are answers which are of high quality ( or even up voted significantly ) then I think that there should be a "community accepted answer" option made availible. – Damian Nikodem Feb 26 '15 at 23:01
  • Community deciding is going to be based on what we already have - net votes by community, and answers are already stacked based on net votes. Essentially, without an accepted answer, community already have an accepted answer - the highest voted one. So accepting an answer is just a questioner's privilege, and I see no solution to the questioner not awarding it, certainly not via community. We are arguably better off leaving "best answer" being determined by total votes - so left open to continuous community voting, rather than locking it down at some period in time. – James Feb 27 '15 at 1:05

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