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I recently flagged this question where the poster was asking how to get his pirated version of MATLAB to work (voluntarily removed by author now).

This is all I can see of it now:

Installing MATLAB in Mac

I suppose I could have went with the off-topic flag, but I felt that this was a good occasion to describe the issue directly.

I don't understand why my flag got declined.

I see that "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention" but I was pretty sure that this required moderator attention.

Can someone explain so I don't make this mistake again?

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    Asking how to install software sounds off-topic anyway, especially pirated software. I don't think it requires moderator intervention. – user3920237 Nov 24 '14 at 20:44
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    For the "decline" side: That question would unquestionably have been downvoted, closed, and probably deleted immediately by the community. Even if it wasn't deleted, the Roomba would get it. For the "helpful" side, we don't want to appear to support piracy. Apparently the moderator went with the former – BradleyDotNET Nov 24 '14 at 20:44
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    I suppose I'm confused about the purpose of the other (needs ♦ moderator attention) flag then. I mean, if it can be assumed that the question should be closed... It seems as though this flag is different and more powerful somehow than the standard flag types? – Okuma.Scott Nov 24 '14 at 20:50
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    There's not really a rule against asking about pirated software, which might be why your flag was declined. Asking how to pirate software is definitely off-topic though, so if you had mentioned that in your flag it might have been handled differently. – Bill the Lizard Nov 24 '14 at 20:50
  • @BilltheLizard Aaah, right. Wording is everything. – Okuma.Scott Nov 24 '14 at 20:53
  • @Okuma.Scott Uses for an "Other" flag: (1) When you see a suspicious edit. (2) When you see an entire series of spam posts (3) when you see plagarized content. The list goes on. Also, make sure to include what you want done when using "Other". – BradleyDotNET Nov 24 '14 at 20:53
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    Yes, unfortunately a small difference in wording can lead mods to the wrong conclusion. Try to be as explicit as possible in what's wrong with a post and what action we should take when using the "Other" flag. That's the best way to get us to pay close attention to what we're doing. – Bill the Lizard Nov 24 '14 at 20:58
  • @BradleyDotNET: I had a flag declined for reporting plagiarised content. Are you sure about that item? – tmyklebu Nov 27 '14 at 1:27
  • @tmyklebu Pretty sure. Was the flag declined simply because the moderator thought it wasn't plagarized? A declined flag doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't flag about it, just that you were wrong in that instance. – BradleyDotNET Nov 27 '14 at 3:55
  • MATLAB knows it is widely pirated and does not care much as it gets students, later paying researchers, into their system. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 Nov 27 '14 at 10:20
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    I always find it hilarious when people have the unmitigated gall and/or naïve ignorance to ask stuff like that out in the open. ◔_◔ I’d say that they are usually dumb kids, but a disappointingly large number of times they turn out to be dumb adults. ¬_¬ – Synetech Jul 11 '15 at 18:47
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Your flag was declined because it did not require moderator intervention.

The question was off-topic regardless of the piracy angle. It was a general software question, which doesn't belong on Stack Overflow.

Even if the question was somehow on-topic, downvoting and other community moderation tools and their associated review queues could have handled this post.

Only flag posts for moderator attention if a moderator is required to handle a post.

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    When is a moderator is required to handle a post? – Charles Holbrow Nov 26 '14 at 19:26
  • @CharlesHolbrow On Meta for example, a request to add the status-completed if the request has been actioned, or to remove a question on justifiable grounds if the user cannot remove it (usually if it is accepted). Also if a certain user keeps posting spam edits and answers (see my question of yesterday (meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/277834/…). – AStopher Nov 26 '14 at 21:20
  • @CharlesHolbrow: when in doubt, search Meta. But one example is if disciplinary action might be required; e.g. if you find someone plagiarising content, or vandalising a series of post through edits, etc. Another would be actions that the community is explicitly prevented from doing, such as deleting an answer marked as accepted, or a question with more than one answer or upvoted answer. – Martijn Pieters Nov 27 '14 at 9:47
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    So SO won't take any action against users trying to use pirated software? Their only 'punishment' is that the community is likely to down-vote / close that one question - seems pretty lenient to me. It's not just asking a poor or off-topic question, it's bringing illegal activities to this site. – Michael Nov 27 '14 at 10:37
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    @Mikaveli: what if it isn't illegal where they live? Not that it matters in this case. No need to go into legal armwrestling (as non-lawyers even), when you can just deal with the post on the far easier grounds of low-quality and off-topic. – Martijn Pieters Nov 27 '14 at 10:40
  • @Mikaveli: bottom line is that this is a legal grey area; that may be enough grounds to reject even on-topic posts (i.e. Stack Overflow doesn't want to get involved in such questions), but this specific meta question was about why the moderator flag was rejected, which was that the question was simply entirely off-topic and the community can handle that just fine. – Martijn Pieters Nov 27 '14 at 10:44
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    Stack Exchanges own policy states "Stack Exchange may not be used for illegal purposes." and "Use of the Network or Services to violate the security of any computer network, crack passwords or security encryption codes, transfer or store illegal material including that are deemed threatening or obscene, or engage in any kind of illegal activity is expressly prohibited.". It doesn't caveat that with "as long as what you're doing is legal somewhere". Yet a user violating the terms of service (regardless of "legality") isn't worthy of moderator attention? – Michael Nov 27 '14 at 11:12
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A related question is Dealing with questions that openly imply software piracy, and Robert Harvey states:

Close and flag these types of questions as too localized.1

Yes, I know it's a bit of a contradiction. We do the same with copyright infringements; moderators are not equipped to deal with copyright claims (copyright claims should be directed at SE Corporate, in the form of a DMCA takedown notice), and routinely decline such flags. We do, however, close and delete such posts on the grounds that plagiarized content is not a good fit for the site.

Questions that ask for help with cracking someone else's software are in violation of Stack Exchange's TOS anyway. See http://stackexchange.com/legal, Section 3(C).

And the relevant excerpt from Section 3(C):

Subscriber represents, warrants and agrees that it will not contribute any Subscriber Content that (a) infringes, violates or otherwise interferes with any copyright or trademark of another party, (b) reveals any trade secret, unless Subscriber owns the trade secret or has the owner’s permission to post it, (c) infringes any intellectual property right of another or the privacy or publicity rights of another,

Asking how to apply a crack is not the same as asking how to crack (i.e., reverse engineering) software. The question is off-topic because it's asking how to install software, by illicit means. It's likely that the question would've been downvoted and closed. It doesn't require moderator intervention.


1) The most appropriate close reason I can see in this case is:

Questions about general computing hardware and software are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve tools used primarily for programming.

Or a custom close reason:

[This question appears to be off-topic because] it's asking about how to install software, via illicit means.

You could try to edit the parts about piracy out if the question is salvageable.

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    That's from over two years ago, and the "too localized" close reason no longer exists. – Andrew Medico Nov 24 '14 at 20:54
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    Also MATALB is is a tool used for programming. – Okuma.Scott Nov 24 '14 at 21:05
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    Wait, there is a custom close/flag reason other than other (needs ♦ moderator attention) ? – Okuma.Scott Nov 24 '14 at 22:46
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    +1 for actually answering the question. Even if that close reason is dated, the basic principle still applies. What current close reason would be the closest? I imagine it would be the same as the current one for plagiarized content. – jpmc26 Nov 24 '14 at 22:48
  • @Okuma.Scott: There's a custom close vote for fill-in-the-blank cases of being off-topic. I don't think there is an equivalent for low rep users raising close flags. – Ben Voigt Nov 25 '14 at 2:20
  • Thanks @BenVoigt, I'll get there eventually. Currently there are no custom flags for people like me (under 3k rep) except for the one I used, which is kind of over powered for low rep people like myself. But I see that in the right circumstances it is a good tool to have. – Okuma.Scott Nov 25 '14 at 12:14
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    @Okuma.Scott: you could also try the "blatantly off-topic" flag if it's a particularly poor question that also happens to be talking about pirated software. – Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 26 '14 at 1:02
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I would say there is one reason to flag for moderator attention (flag with Other or similar): if a link to the pirated software were included in the question. Then I would use the Spam/Offensive flag, because it a) may be actually spam, b) may be malicious software, and c) should be removed and deleted right away rather than just put on hold.

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