71

We have a very serious problem with plagiarism. Previously, we've handled it by sending out moderator messages and suspending the involved party (if repeated).

The problem this causes is that sometimes plagiarism isn't caught until after the threshold for retaining reputation for deleted answers takes effect.

This should not be the case in cases of plagiarism.

One of our flaggers has a system (an out of band process run against the data dump) to detect plagiarism, and as such it helpfully brings up (sometimes years old) cases of plagiarism. The problem is, these users won't lose their reputation unless a specific criteria is met:

The plagiarism is found and deleted within 60 days of the answer being posted and it has a +3 score or better.

In the cases of plagiarism that were flagged today, each had significant scores for an answer, and in most cases (as I said), they were at least a year old.

Plagiarism is toxic; it takes the trust that is built in a community and shatters it for (what ends up being meaningless) gain. For the sake of the community, and to deter plagiarism, there should be a mechanism for moderators or the community team (without having to manually go into the database) to revoke reputation earned through plagiarism.

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    If their reputation was earned to a significant extent by plagiarism ... do we really still need them around? – Bart Nov 18 '14 at 14:02
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    @Bart I'd rather not throw the baby out with the bath water. We don't know how 'significant' it is unless we go through every one of their hundreds of answers manually and check them. At the very least, It'd be nice to have an automatic tool that'd go through a user's answers and check them against other answers and see if they're plagiarized. Hrm.. Sounds like a weekend project. BRB. – George Stocker Nov 18 '14 at 14:04
  • @Bart seems rare that a "first offense" even if from wide-spread plagiarism would trigger a permanent ban, so the user will eventually be unsuspended, so their rep should reflect their actual contributions – psubsee2003 Nov 18 '14 at 14:05
  • Myeah, though I wonder how much baby is in that water if we're talking repeated warnings. But still +1 – Bart Nov 18 '14 at 14:05
  • I think this makes sense. I equate this to the punishment I'm sure a chunk of us would've gotten in school for the same act: A big, fat zero on the assignment. – Kendra Nov 18 '14 at 15:15
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    I think there is a small subset of plagiarists, @Bart, who honestly don't realize it's a bad thing to do, until they are told. Or, some just don't realize we take it seriously. – Andrew Barber Nov 18 '14 at 15:33
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    I can see how that might be the case for minor first offences @AndrewBarber. And in that light the request is fair enough. (I admittedly read it with more serious offences in mind). But for repeat offenders or those who are caught with far more than coincidental copy-paste ... (Might just be the academic background and former journal management kicking in here :) ) – Bart Nov 18 '14 at 17:11
  • @Bart Yup; personally, it kinda boggles me a bit that people wouldn't naturally understand the principle. – Andrew Barber Nov 18 '14 at 19:11
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    How do you define plagiarism? Copying an answer directly? Copying an answer and making minor edits? Major edits? Total rewrites? Copying my own answers? Agree in principal but think there needs to be guidelines in place. – DavidG Nov 19 '14 at 14:51
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    @DavidG Plagiarism has an accepted definition. That's what we mean. – George Stocker Nov 19 '14 at 14:53
  • OOC, if you are finding plagiarism with a tool in years-old posts, how do you know if the post author was the perpetrator or the victim? – T.E.D. May 5 '15 at 12:29
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    @T.E.D. I would assume most old posts that are plagiarizing are being found by domain experts (not a tool) that recognize the content and realize it was created elsewhere. I am also curious how the system mentioned in the post works, though. – Carrie Kendall May 5 '15 at 13:28
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    @CarrieKendall - In my case I saw something that hit me as "off" in a user's post, searched on a phrase, and found it in a web page. It was clear the web page was older because the post was 20 minutes old. But I started going back through the user's history (as one should do), and found matches for almost all of them. However, it got tougher to show primacy as the posts got older. The oldest post (which I suspect was original), looks like it had been copied into various other websites. So what I found was that figuring out if our copy is the original starts to become a non-trivial problem. – T.E.D. May 5 '15 at 13:55
  • ...leaving that up to a tool for year+ posts seems like asking for trouble, unless there is some technique this tool uses that I'm unfamiliar with. That's why I asked. – T.E.D. May 5 '15 at 13:56
  • All I can say is, if I were to build a similar system, it wouldn't just randomly scrape the web. It would probably only test against verified, dated work. @GeorgeStocker do you have any more info on the system that the aforementioned flagger is using? – Carrie Kendall May 5 '15 at 13:58
5

I definitely support this idea. I hate the idea of offenders making rep off of plagiarized content. I do think it will be crucial to specifically define what is considered plagiarism for SE though if it is to be community-moderated.

So, how will SE define plagiarism? Consider the following as test subjects where the original answer is found here and the examples are assumed to be from someone other than me.

sorry for self-advertising but it seems wrong to use someone else's post, even with attribution, when the topic is plagiarism :P

  1. Link to solution:

    Hey, I had this problem too! I found the solution at https://stackoverflow.com/a/29852739/998328

  2. Link to solution:

    You can do this.

  3. Link to solution that isn't a link-only:

    Just use a function containing a switch statement.

  4. Partially copied:

    Use a function:

    var vewModel = {
         empName: [
             { name: 'NAME1' },
             { name: 'NAME2' }
         ]        
     };
    
      vewModel.departmentName = function(name) {
          var departmentName = "Department ";
    
          switch (name) {
              case "NAME2":
                  departmentName += "2";
                  break;
              case "NAME1":
              default:
                  departmentName += "1";
                  break;
          }
    
         return departmentName; 
     }.bind(vewModel);
    
     ko.applyBindings(vewModel);
    
  5. Possibly copied and changed variable names but, same typos (e.g. vewModel):

    Just use a function:

    var vewModel = {
         empName: [
             { name: 'NAME1' },
             { name: 'NAME2' }
         ]        
     };
    
      vewModel.name = function(n) {
          var name = "Department ";
    
          switch (n) {
              case "NAME2":
                  name += "2";
                  break;
              case "NAME1":
              default:
                  name += "1";
                  break;
          }
    
         return name; 
     }.bind(vewModel);
    
     ko.applyBindings(vewModel);
    

If you consider Merriam-Webster's definition:

plagarize - to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own; use (another's production) without crediting the source

Are the above examples plagiarism?

  • My examples have been specific to SE hosted content. Feel free to extend this to include off-site content. – Carrie Kendall May 5 '15 at 14:23
  • #1 #2 are link-only, which means they are content-free, which means nothing is being stolen; all there is is a link to the original. #3 is a link to the original, which should be fine so long as the author uses their own words. #4 probably depends on other factors such as competing answers or code taken from elsewhere, and how much is being copied (since, for example, the same 1 or 2 lines of code can be written the same way by multiple independent authors, etc), but of course there are the blatant cases as well. #5 is a grey area but I'll say that it always rubs me the wrong way. – BoltClock May 5 '15 at 14:48
  • We've had at least one user who applied #5 not to code, but to written English. Stuff like swapping out one or two keywords in a four-line paragraph. It's like they're trying but they won't try hard enough. – BoltClock May 5 '15 at 14:49
  • As for #4 and #5, I hope we can be as defined as possible if there are going to be community-moderated repercussions (similar to spam). It's one thing to have an answer erroneously deleted as link-only, it's another to defame someone's work by erroneously claiming plagiarism – Carrie Kendall May 5 '15 at 14:52
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    I doubt there will be community-moderated repercussions. This is the sort of stuff that needs to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, which means custom-flagging and letting a moderator or employee handle the situation as is the practice today. – BoltClock May 5 '15 at 14:53

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