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This may be one of the most common quandaries I have when looking through Stack Overflow questions, when the author has written an obviously off-topic but genuine question such as

Windows Forms Application Classic Interface c#

I want c# windows form applications but i don't want use classic butons, classic forms element etc. I want use more efficiently, more simple more elegant more impressive interface elements. Do you know any free library in this subject? Thanks a lot...

I often leave a comment on the question advising that Stack Overflow is not for opinions/advice...

Is it appropriate to try and help them out and advise them to ask in the chat rooms, or if you go to www.example.com you will find information, or should you simply not engage in helping, as that is potentially teaching the author that "yes I may be down-voted, but at least I will get my answer in some way".

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What you should do:

  • cast a down vote
  • vote to close (flag to close if you're under 3K rep)
  • comment and explain why their question is bad and how to fix it, use the tour, the help, maybe even a chat session

Don't ever answer an off-topic question, not via chat, comments, or any other way. It is even dangerous to say: go here, Google for that, because next time, they will do the exact same and eventually get what they want.

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    @vba4all to me, summer of love wasn't an obstacle in doing as explained here; I politely voted down, close and wrote comments explaining what's wrong with the question
    – gnat
    Nov 12, 2014 at 13:25
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    @gnat: That is the point indeed. Downvoting isn't rude, but is often interpreted as such. Nov 12, 2014 at 13:26
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    "downvotes are taken so damn personal..." :)
    – gnat
    Nov 12, 2014 at 13:28
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    I do all that but still occasionally I give a hint how to solve the problem (not a full blown answer of course) because I see a spark of light somewhere in the rubbish which other SO users tend not to see or because I'm just a good man. And I'm immensely proud about it. Call it pity or whatever. Does this good or bad to SO? I don't know. Sometimes people improve and the second question is already better than the first one and a nice treatment might be good for something. It's not so clear as many people believe it is. Nov 13, 2014 at 9:47
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    @Trilarion: I agree with you. But trowing a hint isn't an answer. If you comment 'Read up on feature X of Y', then you encourage OP to do his own work before coming here. Nov 13, 2014 at 12:42
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    I feel like there are those who live their entire lives by finding others to answer questions for them. Refusing to enable them to use this site might have noble intentions but it isn't going to stop them from going on that way. In fact, they will in many cases simply be to ignorant to "properly" ask, and never find out. I suppose competitiveness can be a good thing if it encourages people to go beyond the call of duty in making great answers, but it seems terrible if it perpetuates mass stupidity (even among those you deem as 'vampires' because they lack your problem-solving skills). Nov 14, 2014 at 3:10
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    As long as it helps the question, no problem. If it is to get someone an answer who posted when knowing it is off-topic, not okay. @Jason Sep 3, 2015 at 19:26
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    I would argue that the off topic police are too quick to shutdown the questions in many cases when valid technical assistance can be offered. It would be far better to come up with a clear description on how to compose questions the right way and have an automatic way to point people to this information when their question is asked in a way that promotes unhealthy debate.
    – Jason K.
    Sep 3, 2015 at 19:32
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    @Jason agree with your last part, but what more can we do? People don't read the help, don't follow the tour, don't want to read proposed duplicates. This has come up many times on Meta and no one seems to have found the solution. Sep 3, 2015 at 19:33
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    @Jason feel free to work it out in a proposal here on Meta. Don't forget to point me to it, would love to read it. Sep 3, 2015 at 20:04
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    I would recommend against referring people to Meta for proposals as the social community here seems broken. I got many down votes long before getting any constructive feedback and was told how I simply did not understand. I was also called an idiot by a significant contributor in my attempts to outline the proposal. That is not somewhere you want to send people if you want their input.
    – Jason K.
    Sep 3, 2015 at 23:06
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    @Jason: If you just cry "We should make things better", people on meta will say "sure, propose something", and that's to be expected because we know nothing is perfect. If you start an open question asking for proposals to make things better, that's obviously useless: Post a FR like anyone else who has a bright idea, we don't need a question for collecting all of them. Your last / only visible post was justly shot down for a simple reason: You proposed implementing a system which exists, and had nothing new to offer nor would deign to acknowlege that. Sep 6, 2015 at 22:25
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    @user1361991: If it's off-topic, it's off-topic. It doesn't matter who posted it. Dec 4, 2015 at 15:04
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    Why not? It is one of the official downvote reasons. Jul 15, 2017 at 19:17
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    @user1361991 - Flag the question for migration to an appropriate site in the Stack Exchange network. Then, answer the question at its new home. The strategy avoids off-topic questions on Stack Overflow, and provides the answer for future visitors on an appropriate site.
    – jww
    Dec 15, 2017 at 12:49

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