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On several questions I have asked, I receive comments or partial answers that ask for more information. I then update the question with the requested information, but never receive anymore answers, by the commenters or anyone else.

For example, the most recent question I asked: Adding Integers to ArrayList<Integer>. The question was partially answered, suggesting how to fix the error I was receiving (using ArrayList<LinkedList<Integer>> instead of just ArrayList<LinkedList>). But this fix resulted in the same result I was getting by casting to Integer (Integer) as a work around. When I mentioned this, I was asked for more information, including what was being added to the LinkedLists. I updated the question with how I added data and a screenshot showing that there was, in fact, data in the LinkedLists. I, however, have not received any additional responses, and likely will not. I realize the question has only been posted for a few hours, but seeing as how there are no up votes it was obviously not well received.

My questions, then, are:

  • Why do I not receive further answers? Was the provided information not helpful or unclear?
  • Was the question not good in the first place? If so, how should I improve it?
  • Since part of the question was answered, and was helpful, should I accept the answer and ask another, more specific question with what is still not working? Or would that be considered a duplicate since it is closely related?

I have spent time reviewing the many posts on how to ask a question well and I think I have done most of the things suggested, but my questions are still not well received. I am trying, of course, to ask questions that could be valuable to others in the community and not just myself, but is it possible that my questions are too specific to my situation? As a fairly new user, I would really appreciate some guidance on where I am going wrong.

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    How long between your original post and the edits? If it's too long, there's a very good chance the people who were interested in your question (interested enough to ask for clarification) have moved on to something else. Or they've logged off and gone to bed. They may or may not notice you've edited the question. This is why it's worth hanging around for a bit after asking a question to see if anybody asks for more info. – Matt Burland Nov 11 '14 at 19:49
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    Also, just because somebody asks for more info, doesn't mean they are able to actually answer the question. Anybody can see that a question is missing important context (like code!), but once the code is posted they might still not know the answer. – Matt Burland Nov 11 '14 at 19:52
  • I don't know whether this does any good, but when I edit an answer in response to a comment I sometimes add a comment of my own, targeted to the original commenter, along the lines of "I've edited the answer to add ....". – Patricia Shanahan Nov 14 '14 at 0:59
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Why do I not receive further answers? Was the provided information not helpful or unclear?

You only edited your question 1 hour ago and there's still plenty of time for folks to answer. Please have patience as there is no expiration date on questions or answers.

Was the question not good in the first place? If so, how should I improve it?

I'll have to follow up on this, but I will say that often the best code to post in a question is an MCVE since that code is easy for us to test, understand and modify.

Since part of the question was answered, and was helpful, should I accept the answer and ask another, more specific question with what is still not working? Or would that be considered a duplicate since it is closely related?

It's usually best not to ask multi-part questions in the first place but rather to ask specific direct questions. This is one way the MCVE helps as it forces you to focus on and to isolate your problem. It's not uncommon for you to find your problem and its solution while going through the process of making one of these.


Also, don't post code in links for several reasons:

  • Links can go dead with time leaving your question useless for future visitors.
  • Links allow you to link to a huge code base, which means you'd be asking volunteers to go through more code than is really fair to them. This is the reason we ask that you put in effort to create a new minimal program, one that is small enough to not over-tax a volunteer, but has just enough code to compile, run, and demonstrate your problem but no more.
  • Not everyone has access to some links due to firewall restrictions.
  • Some links carry risk of malicious code.
  • Thank you for the feedback. I added the link as suggested in the answer from @BradleyDotNet. In the future, I will be sure to put the actual MCVE code, rather than the link. – SFBA26 Nov 11 '14 at 2:39
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    @SFBA26 Add both. The code so everyone can see it; and a "fiddle" link so people can run it without a dev environment. Definitely don't do just the link though. – BradleyDotNET Nov 11 '14 at 5:08
  • I see, that makes sense. I will do that in the future, thanks. – SFBA26 Nov 11 '14 at 7:42
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    The MCVE is really the key point from my perspective. The fact that the OP should have written one in the first place to do their own debugging before asking is absolutely critical; it's not just about making the question better, but about justifying the question's existence in the first place. – Lightness Races with Monica Nov 12 '14 at 10:44
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Kudos for trying to improve; the question seems pretty good to me, apart from the slightly chameleon nature (thats why you should include a MCVE the first time :) ).

To answer your questions here:

  1. There are lots of reasons you might not be getting answers:

    • People see the question already has answers (and an upvoted one) so aren't interested
    • They aren't able to reproduce your problem
    • They don't know the answer
    • They aren't on the site at the moment (time can help!)
  2. The original was definitely not an MCVE, its hard to tell if the current version is. Don't get me wrong, there are far worse questions on Stack Overflow, but its hard to answer without all the relevant code. You are going down the right path for improvement, but keep working towards a working example. Including a link to a online IDE that demonstrates the problem can be beneficial here.

  3. No don't self-duplicate. Unless the question materially changed (it doesn't appear to have) editing is the right course.

If you really want more attention; you can always put a bounty on it.

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    Thank you for your feedback. In the future, I will be sure to add an actual complete MCVE that runs. Also, I was unaware that there are online Java IDEs and, honestly, did not even think to look for one. That will surely be helpful in the future, so thank you for that tidbit. – SFBA26 Nov 11 '14 at 2:43

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