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I've recently started a new project and I have encountered a number of problems. When I asked two of the questions I had on SO previously, they were both down-voted and my account was blocked from asking any other questions. I have absolutely no idea why.

Now, I have used a new account to ask the question: Failing to send commands to a TMUX session from PHP Since editing the post, adding more information and screenshots to provide ample information the post has been downvoted.

Can anyone please tell me what is wrong with my questioning technique or what I'm not doing because to be perfectly honest, I'm absolutely stumped as to why it seems like everyone on this site hates me.

I'm sure that's not the case but it definitely seems that way in the way in which people reply.

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    A note: Only two poorly-received questions wouldn't get you caught in a post-ban; there must have been some others. (Deleted questions count.) Creating a new account to get around an imposed limitation could get you into trouble. – Fish Below the Ice Oct 31 '14 at 12:50
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    I got a two day post ban for asking two down voted questions. Considering I'm only on holidays for less than 7 days, I couldn't really wait two days. – user4196683 Oct 31 '14 at 23:16
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    A great blog post on the subject from Jon Skeet: Writing the perfect question – Francisco Presencia Nov 1 '14 at 20:55
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    I'm in the same boat. I try to give as much information as possible in my questions and people down vote it because they don't know the answer. One commenter said "Seems too broad" when it was a perfectly legitimate question. If you don't know the answer, move along. People (humans in general) feel better by being a bully and putting other people down. They prefer to criticize rather than help. – Levi Fuller Nov 2 '14 at 4:46
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    "everyone on this site hates me" is BS. They hate your questions, not you. – rightfold Nov 2 '14 at 15:16
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    @LeviFuller "seems to broad" is not a synonym for "I don't know", and it is not bullying. It is trying to help you help yourself. Cut the question into smaller questions that are more reasonable and on topic and you won't have that problem. You are more likely to get an answer this way because small, self contained questions are easier to diagnose and answer. It can in some cases be off the mark and not warranted advice, but it is always worth considering if it actually does apply to your question. – Tim Seguine Nov 2 '14 at 18:50
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    There is a valid complaint raised here. Since joining this forum I have seen a number of questions downvoted along with comments (often quite flippant ones) that clearly showed the writer didn't know diddly about the subject. Many of those questions have subsequently been answered by more expert people. As Levi says above, if you don't know the answer or, I would add, if you are not an expert on the particular subject, or if you don't even understand the terms used in the qustion, pass on. – GuyH Nov 2 '14 at 19:10
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    @Tim Sequine: Seeying a lot of questions marked as too broad but they do get an answer or two, even accepted the answer. Seems too me 'too broad' can be a synoniem to 'don't know'. – brainoverflow Nov 2 '14 at 19:12
  • When to up and downvote equals to < 0, people are tended to downvote earlier. Same for > 0 to upvote it. It's just how psychology works. Am not saying that is true at all quastions or for every voter, but it is a pattern which can be found. A higly underestimated 'feature' though. This is true for comments too. Some people are to lazy to read but to fond to critisize. Of course, there are a lot of voters/commentators who do vote on the subject and are constructive. Value those comments and you do get a better picture too. – brainoverflow Nov 2 '14 at 19:14
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    @brainoverflow no, it is a synonym for "I am of the opinion that a decent answer to this question will be too long for the for the format of this site". Since that is long to type, it has been shortened to "too broad". Whether it gets an answer or not is slightly irrelevant. The user is only expressing their opinion that to deal with the question properly would be too in depth. They might be mistaken, but I still don't think that qualifies as "I don't know" – Tim Seguine Nov 2 '14 at 19:20
  • When a question clearly formulates what is needed to know but you have to read all text, it can't be 'too broad'. It is a lot of times 'don't know', and by far always of course. Luckelly the mentallity about this slowly improving as it isn't constructive but the opposite - so there might be some point in 'our' view on the subject. Seen the ups at Levi Fuller comment, the accepted answer? – brainoverflow Nov 3 '14 at 0:51
  • Don't mistake this for an disagreement on the actual meaning of 'too broad'. Just watch what is happening. There are a lot of questions too broad, too vaque, or even missing a question at all. The infamous 'write me this code' pops up once in a while too. Please do mark them to close in the appropriate way. – brainoverflow Nov 3 '14 at 1:06
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Your question is fine. I think your downvoter got a little carried away, not because the question is bad, but because the thing you are trying to do is highly insecure. It also looks like he didn't bother to thoroughly read the info you provided, even before your edits. Haters gonna hate.

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    Ah, thank you for your answer, Even with my comment of "Yes I understand the security implications, this is behind a 2 separate login screens" an answerer still decided to post in bold im going to be hacked... I dont find that very mature at all to be honest. – user4196683 Oct 31 '14 at 4:44
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    I posted that answer, and I included the warning as due diligence, so no one can come back and say "why did you enable this guy to do this improper thing without warning him about the consequences?" I updated the answer a little bit to make the warning less... abrasive. – ErlVolton Oct 31 '14 at 4:49
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    The downvotes could have been on the original version of the question, which only said that what he OP tried "has not worked". Details about how it fails (which is critical for a good question) were only added in a later edit. – Reto Koradi Oct 31 '14 at 7:31
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    Actually I was sitting on the page and the down vote came after the edit. – user4196683 Oct 31 '14 at 8:47
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    It seems to me, if the answer to a question is "Don't do that! It's not secure!", then the question + answer is highly useful. If they knew that it was not secure, they wouldn't ask the question. Also, security is highly, highly dependent on context; sometimes you don't care because an attacker couldn't compromise anything significant. – A. L. Flanagan Oct 31 '14 at 20:20
  • @A.L.Flanagan I agree bad practices can make good questions, but we also give people the freedom to (anonymously) downvote as they wish, as long as they don't focus on one user. I wouldn't have downvoted here, FWIW. Equally, I don't think there's any evidence to label the downvoters as (urgh) "haters". – halfer Nov 1 '14 at 21:26
  • @MichaelBetterton Also consider that you are not the only the target audience of any answer. There's the hypothetical "people from the future", it is important to note any security issues that might be in example code within an answer. Even though it might be secure enough in your particular use-case, someone else may come along and copy portions of the answer's code, and there's nothing saying they have taken precautions that are assumed to exist in the answer. A good answer in this case will include a warning about security even though you addressed it in the comments, which may be removed – Chris Baker Nov 2 '14 at 5:07
  • +1 JUST for haters gonna hate – user562566 Nov 3 '14 at 0:27
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Issues:

  1. As mentioned, you're trying to do something horribly insecure. People can downvote questions or answers to demote insecure practices. That's their prerogative.

  2. No debugging (or not enough). Saving the command you're building to a variable and echoing for inspection probably would have made the issue obvious to you, or at least gotten you an answer quicker.

  3. Screenshots of text. We hates it! It burns us!

  4. Overly broad tagging.

  5. Vague info, e.g. "added both www-data and www-user to sudoers". Were those users or groups? If users, why would you need to add more than one user? The web server can only be running as one user at a time.

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    @self: we try here to assess people on the quality of their immediate answer. It often happens that low-rep users can score more highly than established users, and that's a good thing - it's a meritocracy (albeit with a few rough edges). Note though I don't say "beat" - as much as I think gamification is useful here, it isn't actually a competition. – halfer Nov 1 '14 at 21:19
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Part of the mouseover on the down vote is 'it is not useful' Arguably, one could claim that asking how to do something insecure is not useful.

Realize that people come to Stack Overflow to find out how to do things. And far too often there are very insecure bits in the php or similar code that is blatantly insecure (just go look for sql injections and be afraid). Often, the people giving answers don't fix this and people (the asker and others finding it) copy the insecure code further eroding the security of the web and computer networks.

So no. Asking how to do something insecure isn't useful. Down votes communicate that there is something wrong with the question or answer.

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    Your'e implying that I need to post the entire website then to show that it is in fact secure. As I said in the comments, its behind two separate login scripts. Thats about as secure as a minecraft server needs to be in my opinion. – user4196683 Oct 31 '14 at 5:13
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    It's definitely not secure, that's not up for debate. What @MichaelIT and I disagree on is whether a question asking how to do something insecure is inherently not useful. I would say that it's doubly useful, not only do you learn to accomplish X, but you learned how to do it securely or maybe why not to do it at all. – ErlVolton Oct 31 '14 at 5:16
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    And we can get super meta by discussing the meta in this meta: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/275769/…. Hey bro I heard you like meta. – ErlVolton Oct 31 '14 at 5:21
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    @MichaelT your contention that something insecure is useless, is a fallacy. If someone has got to that stage of having sudo access to a server and starts playing with TMUX, it is a fair assumption they have a base level of understanding of computer systems and should have a understanding of security. I am aware of sql injection and just how easy it is to install Kali and go around deleting databases. I also understand how insecure php post scripts are, regardless of this, I think it is a fair assumption that anyone searching for something this precise, knows what they are doing an extent. – user4196683 Oct 31 '14 at 8:55
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    @MichaelBetterton I didn't say useless. I said not useful. The score of a question impacts several systems of ranking the question. I don't want questions putting forth bad practices to be highly scored, nor the answers that enable them - people see highly scored posts and duplicate them in their own code. If I could, I would wipe out hundreds of old 'perl cgi' tutorials that had some awful and insecure code in them and lead to numerous security holes. Lastly, realize that people vote however they want to; trying to change this is largely futile. – user289086 Oct 31 '14 at 14:46
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    @MichaelB No, having sudo access to a server and playing with TMUX is not as strong evidence for security expertise as taking post data and executing it is evidence against. And regardless of it being useful to you, we vote on it being useful to us and some random passer by. That question being upvoted/recommended indicates that what you are doing is a reasonable practice. There are parallels with SQL injection, but SQL injection means that they have access to your database: what you did means they have access to your entire server. SQL injection is a failure mode: so is your design – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 31 '14 at 19:29
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    So we can't help careless downvoters, but if you've gotten this far you must want to do the right thing. If you're like @MichaelT and feel the question should be downvoted due to promoting insecure practices, please make sure to first comment saying "There's never a good reason to do X because you can get the same result with Y which is easier and not horribly insecure" – ErlVolton Oct 31 '14 at 21:22

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