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Just now, I stumbled upon this question:
AngularJS - Multiple binding - calculating input values

All the (first revision of the) question contains is a problem statement and a fiddle link. To circumvent the "code in question" message you get when trying to post a question with nothing but a fiddle link, the OP wrapped the link in a code block.

Would it be an idea to disallow fiddle links in code blocks altogether?
When something like that is detected, a warning message could appear saying something along the lines of: "It looks like you're trying to link to a off-site example. Please include a MCVE in your question."

Sure, the OP can just code-block some different part of the OP, but at very least the link's clickable.

Here's another example:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/26652521/how-to-use-list-sorting-script
Let's see if the OP fixes the post... (He did)

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    Credits where due, the OP did add code to his question after asking him to. – Cerbrus Oct 27 '14 at 10:44
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    I feel like this is enough of an edge case that we can just edit/close where necessary. – Chris Oct 27 '14 at 22:47
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    You see this all the time, linking to other off-site code repositories. Any particular reason why Fiddle gets special treatment? – Hot Licks Oct 28 '14 at 0:23
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    @Chris Hangout in the JavaScript tags long enough and you will see this happens a lot with new users. There is the filter with posting no code with a jsfiddle link so don't think this is too extreme. – epascarello Oct 28 '14 at 0:39
  • @HotLicks: SE already has some functionality to prevent a user from posting, when the post contains only a fiddle link, and no code. I'm just asking for an addition to that functionality. Fiddle is by far the most used site to post JS code snippets. This could be implemented for other sites too, though. – Cerbrus Oct 28 '14 at 7:51
  • What if someone's code actually contains a jsfiddle URL? e.g. page = url.get("http://jsfiddle.net/rewnao6p/3/") – daemonspring Nov 26 '14 at 5:27
  • Have you ever actually seen that, @curiousinternals? – Cerbrus Nov 26 '14 at 7:10
  • @Cerbrus Not yet, but I can imagine scenarios in which that problem might pop up and frustrate someone. One of my own personal projects has code that fetches from a website with similar features. I could have used either website in my code. If I'd asked a question about it, I would probably have fallen foul of such a rule. I mention this because earlier this week I got bitten by code meant to stop people forgetting to put their code in a code block. Unless misuses can be detected perfectly, there's the potential for friendly fire. – daemonspring Nov 27 '14 at 2:12
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To circumvent the "code in question" message you get when trying to post a question with nothing but a fiddle link, the OP wrapped the link in a code block.

If the OP was intentionally trying to circumvent the filtration systems already in place, then disallowing fiddle links in code blocks certainly wouldn't have stopped him, he would have just added some spaces to the link or something until the filter no longer blocked him. Because of this, I don't think adding an additional filter to catch jsFiddle links in code blocks would be particularly useful.


One thing I did notice though which may have contributed to the problem in this particular case is the message shown to users who attempt to post questions with links to jsFiddle and no code:

Links to jsfiddle.net must be accompanied by code. Please indent all code by 4 spaces using the code toolbar button or the CTRL+K keyboard shortcut. For more editing help, click the [?] toolbar icon.

If the OP didn't read carefully, he may have read the message like this:

Links to jsfiddle.net must be accompanied by code. Please indent all code by 4 spaces using the code toolbar button or the CTRL+K keyboard shortcut. For more editing help, click the [?] toolbar icon.

"Oh, it wants me to indent my jsFiddle link. Okay I can do that... oh look, the message went away. Great, now I can post my question."

Maybe that message should be re-phrased.

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    That's an interesting interpretation, could explain a whole bunch of cases. – brasofilo Oct 28 '14 at 14:15
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    You are correct that someone who just wants to circumvent the filter will find a way. However, if the filter is such that the link has to be mangled (e.g. by adding spaces in it) to circumvent it, there's a greater chance that people reading the question will act with downvotes, close votes, comments, etc. – Louis Oct 28 '14 at 14:17
  • @Louis: Exactly. A filter like this will make malicious intent stand out even more. – Cerbrus Oct 28 '14 at 15:29
  • @Louis Do we really have a recurring problem with jsFiddle links posted in code blocks going unnoticed and uncorrected though? In this particular case, Cerbrus left a comment to the OP about the link, and the OP fixed the problem. – Ajedi32 Oct 28 '14 at 15:52
  • @Louis Also, if jsFiddle links posted in code blocks going unnoticed and uncorrected is a recurring problem, do you believe forcing the OP to work around the new filter would have a significant impact on it? Would an extra space in the URL really result in a significantly higher number of "downvotes, close votes, comments, etc" on questions which include jsFiddle links with no code? – Ajedi32 Oct 28 '14 at 15:56
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    @Ajedi32: Great minds: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/293510/… – T.J. Crowder May 10 '15 at 7:10

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