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I'm in the process of writing an application-specific design question. While I was writing, I realized that I didn't really want to ask this question on SO: it would be difficult for SO community members to answer. It's the sort of question that would better be posed to my fellow collaborators.

I'm looking for a way to do that in the style of SO, that is, syntax-highlighted code blocks interspersed with comments, explanations, and questions. In short, SO questions are the perfect hybrid of email and lpaste for communicating over the internet about technical design issues. I've considered putting my question on Github, but the editing tools are lacking. On SO, you can simply highlight code and add a link, code block, or quotes. Trac is a little closer to the editing power of SO, but I'm not interested in hosting my own Trac server. In short, I'm not aware of any way as simple as a SO question to interleave code and comments in a seamless fashion.

Thus I'm proposing a "private" question feature, which is not listed for the community. I'm not particularly concerned with privacy, I'm just looking for a way to send out a link to collaborators. Another use for this feature would be "publishing" mode, where a question can be edited without being posted (this sounds a lot like the "Ask a new question" page, but I could have persistent un-posted questions this way, which means I can close a tab or think about a problem overnight before posting for the community.)

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    GitHub will render markdown just like SO, and is sometimes used for "information" repositories. See e.g. github.com/NYTimes/objective-c-style-guide There are markdown editors for whatever OS you run. – Josh Caswell Oct 24 '14 at 4:31
  • As I mentiond, it does not have the editing tools that SO has. I have to add ```language to each of my code blocks, for starters. – crockeea Oct 24 '14 at 4:32
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    @Eric - We share code via Google Docs. It sucks royally. A side project I'm conceiving is one where we create a cloud based Markdown wiki that runs on Google App Engine or some other free cloud-based platform. It would target developers, be easy to setup, and be free for basic usage, since GAE and Heroku both have free tiers. Is that sort of what you have in mind? – jmort253 Oct 24 '14 at 4:43
  • For private stuff, we use GitHub's issue tracker. It's attached to the project repo, so all devs on the project can collaborate on it. The problem is when we want to share it outside the development team. That's where Google Docs comes in, and where GitHub's wiki and issue tracker fall on their face... – jmort253 Oct 24 '14 at 4:45
  • @jmort253 Pretty much. I'm not looking to "share code" necessarily, just communicate about code in an effective way, which usually involves highlighted snippets and text explanations...just like SO offers. – crockeea Oct 24 '14 at 4:45
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    For now, GitHub's issue tracker (and maybe BitBucket too) is your best bet... one workaround is to create an empty repo that you can share with your collaborators, then use the issue tracker to @mention people.... – jmort253 Oct 24 '14 at 4:49
  • @jmort253 I work on open source projects, which are all available on GitHub, but for some communications among the core team that should be recorded but should not be public (in the same sense that emails should not be public) I've created a BitBucket project. BitBucket is useful for that... – Louis Oct 24 '14 at 11:25
  • @Louis Yes! that's the problem I'd want to solve that Google Docs solves without Markdown but that GitHub/Bitbucket doesn't solve with sharing features but with Markdown. :) I think Bitbucket is limited to only 5 users for free, private projects, so that's a bummer for bigger teams. – jmort253 Oct 24 '14 at 16:13
  • @jmort253 We're a small team so it works for us. But otherwise, that'd be a problem. – Louis Oct 24 '14 at 16:15
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You'd be much better off using any number of free / open source Q&A platforms for this, hosted on an intranet (or behind some other kind of wall). Stack Overflow is happy to not charge at all because you're giving us something that we can happily give other people, completely free. Making certain questions 'private' would be the antithesis of that philosophy.

Sure, we could conceivably implement some kind of feature that allowed folks to pay for private / invitation-only access to certain questions, but that would be a massive change if you think about it. Everything from notifications to the history we show on your profile would have to work in conjunction with that, and it's so far away from our core business model, it's just not worth it for us. It would also create additional support overhead, which is the last thing we want to do right now.

It sounds like you'd be better off finding something that exists and adopting it to fit your need, or just writing something extremely simple to do what you need. Really, if you sit down and think of the features you really need out of the engine ... you could almost hammer a schema for it together in a single sitting if you keep it simple.

To be honest, I've yet to see a bug system well-married to Q&A - I know that's a pretty deep rabbit hole, but probably worthwhile to explore, if you've got the time.

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It is interesting to read some old Meta posts. It seems like in 2019, a lot of the requested features are implemented via Stack Overflow for Teams. This would certainly allow asking a question privately; however, it is not free of charge (special pricing might be available for non-profit and educational organizations).

From Tim Post:

Sure, we could conceivably implement some kind of feature that allowed folks to pay for private / invitation-only access to certain questions, but that would be a massive change if you think about it. Everything from notifications to the history we show on your profile would have to work in conjunction with that, and it's so far away from our core business model, it's just not worth it for us. It would also create additional support overhead, which is the last thing we want to do right now.

Things change. Now, it is certainly a part of the business model.

  • I got quite a bit of "hate" (in -1s) for a feature that eventually got adopted :) – crockeea Aug 22 at 18:00
  • @crockeea Just corrected 5% of the "hate" :) 5 years change a lot, apparently. – Anton Menshov Aug 22 at 18:03

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