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Question is here: How to remove or hide powered by text from Google Translate

I've commented to let the user know this is violating Google's TOS, but I was wondering if this should be flagged?

As @gunr2171 pointed out, the TOS for StackExchange (understandably) state:

Use of the Network or Services to violate the security of any computer network, crack passwords or security encryption codes, transfer or store illegal material including that are deemed threatening or obscene, or engage in any kind of illegal activity is expressly prohibited.

However, as many of the comments here have noted, there (also understandably) seems to be a precedent about not policing third parties' policies: Should moderators enforce NDAs for software vendors?

It seems like this is a contradiction. I appreciate everyone's contributions and just want to know which way to go when this kind of thing happens in the future.

Thanks!

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    From the TOS for this site: "Use of the Network or Services to violate the security of any computer network, crack passwords or security encryption codes, transfer or store illegal material including that are deemed threatening or obscene, or engage in any kind of illegal activity is expressly prohibited." – gunr2171 Oct 20 '14 at 20:38
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    I would vote to close as "off topic > This question appears off-topic because it intentionally tries to violate a 3rd party's TOS." I just need someone to back me up and I'll do it. – gunr2171 Oct 20 '14 at 20:40
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    Aww come on, where's dat hacker spirit !!! – Coffee Oct 20 '14 at 20:40
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    That said, we're not responsible for policing other companies' Terms of Service. Questions like this can always be re-phrased in some way that doesn't identify the target company being abused. – Robert Harvey Oct 20 '14 at 20:41
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    Same answer as for enforcing NDAs meta.stackexchange.com/questions/94465/… – Will Oct 20 '14 at 20:44
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    @Coffee: When you browse a random website on the Internet, you don't enter into a legal agreement with the company who owns the website, requiring you to see the ads. That's not the case here. – Robert Harvey Oct 20 '14 at 20:45
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    You already informed people when you posted the comment below the question. – Robert Harvey Oct 20 '14 at 20:48
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    Google's terms of service aren't laws, guys. – Bill the Lizard Oct 20 '14 at 21:00
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    But AFAIK they are legally binding? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terms_of_service – CullenJ Oct 20 '14 at 21:05
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    Just as we cannot expect moderators to judge the factual correctness of an answer, we cannot expect them to judge the legal compliance of a question with various contracts. Mods are simply not qualified and not trained for this kind of question. The correct people to make that call would most likely be the stackexchange lawyer team; and the correct person to contact them is IMO only someone with standing in this case I.e. Google's lawyers – HugoRune Oct 20 '14 at 22:11
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    @CullenJ Just because they may be binding in the US, does not mean they are binding in every Stackoverflow user's country (or does it?) – Richard Le Mesurier Oct 21 '14 at 8:42
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    Besides, what if the user is asking for "research" purposes? Surely researching various "hacking" techniques is not guaranteed to be bad? I myself did a lot of research into virus writing when I wrote a virus scanner... – Richard Le Mesurier Oct 21 '14 at 8:45
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    In many jurisdictions, "violating" TOS is not illegal - it could be breach of contract, if the other party thought so (but that would be a civil matter). But then again in many jurisdictions, a TOS would only be a valid contract if someone had explicitly accepted it. StackOverflow is a worldwide site, so as long as the question itself is not illegal I would just warn the OP that the topic of the question is questionable. – Erwin Bolwidt Oct 21 '14 at 9:14
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    I am not sure if asking how to kill a person makes you a killer and the question illegal. Well, unless the user actually performs the action, he would not be breaching the TOS of the company. Why asking such a question makes it illegal. Also, you might feel like not answering the question on ethical grounds but does it still make asking the question as performing an illegal action? I wonder regarding the technicality. – Shakti Prakash Singh Oct 21 '14 at 11:03
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    It's definitely worth adding a comment saying that their code will probably be violating the TOS, and Google may (and historically sometimes has) intentionally break their code for doing so, and that there's an official way that Google wants you to do this that's a whole lot easier, and so on. And if you want to conclude, "And therefore, I'm not going to answer this, and don't be surprised if no one else does", that seems reasonable. But insisting that it be closed, I'm not sure about. – abarnert Oct 22 '14 at 1:47
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I think we've exhausted this topic in the comments at this point, so I'm posting the answer that was reached in the comments.

TL;DR: Not our responsibility, so informing them and leaving it alone is the best we can do.

I really liked how @HugoRune put it, so I'm copying his comment here:

Just as we cannot expect moderators to judge the factual correctness of an answer, we cannot expect them to judge the legal compliance of a question with various contracts. Mods are simply not qualified and not trained for this kind of question. The correct people to make that call would most likely be the stackexchange lawyer team; and the correct person to contact them is IMO only someone with standing in this case I.e. Google's lawyers

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