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On nearly daily basis, I'm seeing good questions and answers to those, when I Google my problems. Most of those are here on Stack Overflow, so I decided to join in and ask two questions that I simply couldn't figure out.

I managed to solve one of them on my own, but the other one is still open. I'm wondering if there is something wrong with the way I ask or with the question itself. I know most (or all, not sure) of the users are doing this of their own will and aren't getting paid or anything to answer these questions, so I am not complaining, I am trying to figure out what I can do to ask the questions better or to find out what's wrong with them.

I would like some constructive comments, if there is something wrong with the questions.

Or maybe I was to excited about the Stack Overflow community and the questions where too specific or hard.

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    Your questions seem to have a large amount of code. It is best to show only a minimal example to generate the problem. – John Palmer Oct 20 '14 at 11:03
  • Should I rewrite the question, which is still open or should I close it and refraise a new one? I mean I did reduce the code a bit before asking and I think most of the code is mandatory for giving an example in that case. – Firen Oct 20 '14 at 11:05
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    I would definitely edit the questions – John Palmer Oct 20 '14 at 11:08
  • Ok, would this "reset" the questions position, so it can get attention? Hope this doesn't sound wrong :D – Firen Oct 20 '14 at 11:10
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    Yes, editing will bump a post to the top of the new queue – John Palmer Oct 20 '14 at 11:11
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    Your question is rather broad or opinion based and not ONE question but several questions. If you ask to do things better / faster, please specify in which context? Faster in execution? faster/better for maintenance? faster in the UI layer? Faster in the DB? Peceived faster? And if you have working code you might check codereview.se if your question is on-topic there (visit their help and meta!) – rene Oct 20 '14 at 11:13
  • @rene Is it better to split this question into multiple? Also I did state that I would like to see faster responses on the UI level and I also thought that it would be obvious that I wouldn't ask an Oracle/DB performance related question, with this tags. Thank you for the link to codereview, I will def take a look at that site. :) – Firen Oct 20 '14 at 11:24
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    Yes, ask one question. And for performance still goes: What are your current meassurements/timings, which path is taking the longest, where are you aiming for and what did you try to improve the performance. – rene Oct 20 '14 at 11:28
  • Ok thank you all, very quick and helpful input. I will try to refraise my question, maybe it will be anwsered then. – Firen Oct 20 '14 at 11:31
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    Please go easy on the formatting. Italics are good for emphasis, bold italics is overkill. Writing entire paragraphs in bold, italics or both, is even extremely annoying. The larger "headings" in between can also be in the regular font. Finally, you don't have to ask for any suggestion -- you have stated your questions, and if anyone has anything more to offer, you're sure to get a comment on it. – usr2564301 Oct 20 '14 at 11:45
  • In case you missed the CodeReview link: codereview.stackexchange.com – rene Oct 20 '14 at 12:00
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I put your question on hold to give you a shot to fix it.

Here's what I suggest:

  • Reduce the scope of your question to one part of your application. It could be the database, it could be the rendering, whatever.
  • If you have a problem with that part of your application, give us just enough detail to reproduce the problem. Menu doesn't render like you think it should? Application repaints everything on every load? Give us a small isolated example that reproduces that issue.
  • If your application is slow, narrow it down to whichever part you need help with. Database? Then give us a straight query; the table structure; sample data; and how long it takes vs. how long it should take? In your case, you have dynamic SQL, and there can be a few reasons why it's slow (no indexes, no ability to cache the query plan since you're not parameterizing your queries (depending on your settings); bad statistics (based on the whole parameterization thing), SELECT *. It could be a lot of things. So, give us a query, its execution performance, what you'd like to get it down to, and the indexes, table structure, parameterization settings, etc.

Does this sound like a lot of work?

It is.

It's also required. Not so much for us (although it is), but more so for you. If we give you a copy/paste solution, it may not work; and even worse is that you may not understand it to the depths you need to to know how to apply it. By framing the question in such a way where you've done all this research first, you've made our job easier (we don't give you a false answer), and you've learned a lot in the process so when we tell you to add specific indexes and only query on what you need, you know what that means.

There are four approaches to well-received questions:

  • An easy subject that everyone knows about
  • a problem everyone has
  • luck
  • hard work, research, cutting the cruft out of your question, and focusing on one thing. Giving us everything we need to solve your issue without burdening us with things that don't matter.

Your question falls into the last category. Good luck.

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    ↑↑↑ art of asking a question on SO – user2140173 Oct 20 '14 at 12:47
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    I will try to rethink my question and set the focus on my main issue, very nice and constructiv answer. Thank you very much. How can I "disable" the hold, after I did the edit? – Firen Oct 20 '14 at 13:21
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    @MichaM. After you edit the question, it'll automatically get kicked into the re-open queue. The community will review it and if the edit makes it clear and answerable (and addresses the issues I brought up in my answer), it'll be re-opened. Since I'm already directly involved, if you reply to my comment on your question, I can look and see if it should be reopened right then. – George Stocker Oct 20 '14 at 13:24

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