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As you may know if you work on CSS, that Twitter has made a CSS framework called "Bootstrap" and is used widely among websites and apps.

Stackoverflow has created a tag "twitter-bootstrap" solely for it. However, many new users and some experienced users used the tag "bootstrap" for these questions instead but the tag means something totally different.

Example of me fighting the problem: How to stop bootstrap carousel automatic slide in mobile


Request

I have noticed that if you hover over the tag "bootstrap", it displayed:

NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH Twitter's Bootstrap CSS framework; please use the twitter-bootstrap tag. A bootstrap is a series of procedures run when an application starts up or a request over the web is received.

However, it seems that many people didn't notice the text. I have a suggestion. What if Stack Exchange implement a new procedure to the site?

The idea is the site knows a list of tags that are used incorrectly many times. When users attempt to ask a question with these tags, display an alert with something like this:

----------------------------------------------------
| Warning, you are posting a question using tag "A"
|---------------------------------------------------
| Not to be confused with the tag "B":
|
|  - Tag "A" means this and this and this...
|  - Tag "B" means this and this and this...
|---------------------------------------------------
| Are you sure you want to post this question using tag "A"? [Yes] [No]
| [Checkbox] Always display this message.
----------------------------------------------------

In this case, this alert will appear when users attempt to ask about "bootstrap" and not "twitter-bootstrap".

This way, the process of asking may be disturbed for just a bit, but the positive results will be much greater that this feature will be feasible and effective.

Reasons for this feature request

  1. Improve "tag" search results
  2. Improve the situation of Unanswered Questions because OP have tagged them wrongly
  3. Make it clearer of what OP is actually asking for.

Arguments (Please comment for arguments opposing this idea)

A: Too much clicking would be required for users that actually know what the tag is about.

The user should get to choose not to display the warning at second time. It is only a shout-out for all new comers to know special distinctions on confusing tags. Also, click once per user VS editing tag by only a few is a great example of the benefits.


So what do you think of this?

  • 1
    No thanks. Too much clicking would be required for users that actually know what the tag is about. – Cerbrus Oct 16 '14 at 14:40
  • 2
    I'm a little concerned by the comment you received under the question you link to. Bootstrapping predates Twitter by decades, but the battle is deemed "futile" and the [bootstrap] tag should be "burninated or repurposed" simply because Twitter uses the term now? That makes me sad. – Frédéric Hamidi Oct 16 '14 at 14:50
  • 2
    @Cerbrus Notice how I suggested that the user get to choose not the display message at second time. It is only a shout-out for all to know the rules. Also, click once per user VS editing tag by few is a great example of the benefits. – Daniel Cheung Oct 16 '14 at 14:54
  • 1
    A notification would also be useful for tags which mean nothing; those tags could prompt to choose a better tag. – Pokechu22 Oct 16 '14 at 15:07
  • @Pokechu22 I agree, sometimes I see questions tagged "twitter-bootstrap-3" but the question is not targeted specifically for the ver. 3 of Bootstrap, so I think notifications will be useful in several other ways. – Daniel Cheung Oct 16 '14 at 15:17
  • @Pokechu22: How do you propose SO would recognize when a tag means nothing? – Cerbrus Oct 16 '14 at 15:31
  • @Cerbrus It wouldn't be automatic. The most logical thing would be something similar to tag synonyms. – Pokechu22 Oct 16 '14 at 15:32
  • @Pokechu22 Well, I don't really agree on making "bootstrap" and "twitter-bootstrap" synonyms because they are actually not – Daniel Cheung Oct 17 '14 at 9:52
  • You are not familiar with Microsoft Word's Clippy? The annoying character that popped up on the merest hint of a user having a problem, and persisted so much in asking "Do you need help with that?" until hard discs were forcefully removed and thrown out? – usr2564301 Oct 17 '14 at 10:01

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