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I have recently come across this Stack Overflow question asking how to split a string into an array in JavaScript.

It contained a typo in the code (possibly a presentation issue, possibly not), and a few answers popped up (one of which pointed this error out). Another 'answerer' decided to edit the question to 'fix' this error, while the other answerer received downvotes due to there now being 'no error' anymore.

The answerer also stated that this was only part of their answer and was going to amend the answer further.

Is this right for an answerer to 'edit the question' to make their answer 'work'?

The comments below suggested that:

it is exactly how the site is meant to operate when it is utterly obvious that the error is merely in presentation and not representative of the actual issue. It's like when people try to put asterisks in their code to highlight parts. It can be very obvious what the intent was, and so it's perfectly fine to remove them.

Is this correct?

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    All right, y'all want to fight about this, take it out of comments and into a chatroom. This was getting way out of hand, so I've removed this argument. – Brad Larson Oct 14 '14 at 16:31
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It contained a typo in the code (possibly a presentation issue, possibly not),

In cases like this DON'T edit the code in the question simply because you don't know whether it's a typo in the question or their real code, and "fixing" the typo may render the question redundant.

Personally I'd leave a comment pointing out the possible error and move on, but you're welcome to post an answer pointing it out. However, if you do this make sure you check back on the question to see if they've fixed the typo this making your answer useless.

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  • FYI, this is what happens when we don't apply common sense to edits. Thankfully it was rejected. You answered correctly the specific sentence you quoted, but that sentence was very misleading. Different situation, same problem. – user1106925 Oct 27 '14 at 15:06

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