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I want to suggest making the top navigation bar in an fixed position. I would like to see this change for the following reasons:

  1. This would be beneficial while answering questions because you could easily begin typing in the search bar to see if the question may have already been asked.
  2. Also, the comment/answer notifications would be visible at all times.
  3. I personally think bars with fixed positions gives sites a better look and feel.

How does everyone else feel about this?

  • 7
    See Should the top navigation be frozen (optional)? on the Overmeta. (Nitpicking: it's "fixed", not "absolute".) – Frédéric Hamidi Oct 7 '14 at 20:19
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    @FrédéricHamidi your right don't know what I was thinking. Edit has been made – urnotsam Oct 7 '14 at 20:23
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    Optional, or not at all. Widescreen monitors are already short enough without having website bars permanently claim vertical space. – Andrew Medico Oct 7 '14 at 20:40
  • Alternately, we could go the mobile way, with the top bar reappearing as soon as you scroll up. Still looks highly disruptive to me, though. – Frédéric Hamidi Oct 7 '14 at 20:44
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    I like the advantages - frequently used buttons and info always there, but I also find them distracting and annoying as I scroll, especially when they flicker, or click into place on catch up and cover the text I'm reading. I hate them more than I like them. I can scroll up or press various buttons to get to the top, I can't however ignore the stalker bar – James Oct 15 '14 at 0:14
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    @urnotsam I upvoted this, as for me, when I'm scrolling through the questions, it's really helpful to see any notifications arrived. Why would I want to again press home button just to see the notifications. – Soham Dasgupta Feb 15 '16 at 8:01
4

This post was pushed to the front page today (i.e. I hadn't seen it before), but I wrote a simple little userscript a while ago that does this.

It has a few tiny bugs, but it works pretty well overall and can be downloaded from Greasy Fork.

enter image description here

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    And the page layout should be improved for wide / large screens too. In your screenshot, half the space is wasted... – JonasCz - Reinstate Monica Mar 26 '15 at 14:15
0

Feb 2017 Update

As of February 14th, Stack Overflow has pushed out a new nav bar implementing the exact thing this answer suggested: a fixed header with a user-toggleable option to turn off position: fixed. Now, if I could just find the crystal ball I used to originally answer this question...


Yes, I think there should be. It could easily be given an "enabled/disabled" parameter so that those who want it can have it, while others can opt out. Having the bar at the top would eliminate a lot of scrolling or at least extra key strokes to get to the top for various reasons:

However, there is already a touted solution for this: StackOverflow Enhancer, over on Stack Apps. With such a solution, I doubt the site owners will add such a feature into the nightly builds, especially when the same request got downvoted in the aggregate over on MSE.

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    @Deduplicator Your comment is non-constructive at best. Do you have some useful criticism to provide? Or do you just travel around old posts and provide esoteric comments and downvotes for things you don't like? – TylerH Feb 15 '15 at 22:39
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    I'm sorry if you didn't get the reference. I'm referring to the fact that adding options is expensive and in this case certainly not useful. Sometimes designers really have to make a decision, instead of deferring it. – Deduplicator Feb 15 '15 at 22:48
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    @Deduplicator I agree an option in this case is not a good outcome. I would gladly accept the lack of an option in the event of simply changing the header to position: fixed;. – TylerH Feb 16 '15 at 15:04
-1

If you want a website to be styled anyway you please, why not just add an extension to your browser like StyleBot. Save any styles you want to it.

Incredibly useful for hiding or modifying sections of sites you frequent....

-2

I was just about to post this question. I've wondered for years why it's not like this. Just fyi, here's the quick script I use with CJS to solve this issue. Though it would be real nice if I didn't have to hack around like this ...

;;(function($) {
    function z() {
        var a = $(window).scrollTop(),
            b = $(".topbar").height();
        a > b ? ($(".topbar").css({ position: "fixed", top: 0, "z-index": 999 }), $("body > .container").css({ "margin-top": b })) 
            : ($(".topbar").css({ position: "", top: "", "z-index": "" }), $("body > .container").css({ "margin-top": "" }))
    }
    if (document.readyState == "complete") z();
    else window.onload = z;
    $(window).on("scroll", function(a) {
        this.tmr && clearTimeout(this.tmr);
        this.tmr = setTimeout(z, 10)
    });
})(jQuery);

FYI, this works well since they use jQuery, thus helps make it a little easier ...

One Caveat: with CJS, you'll have to add it for each stack site. There are other script injectors that could help you avoid this, but i like the simplicity of cjs and the fact the code breakdown of it is extremely simple and lightweight. I even have my own version of it on home pc. It's about the lightest script injector you can get on chrome.

How to avoid caveat! ¡updated! 5/17/16

I made a dirty (quick & ez) Chrome Extension based on this code. It works on most all Stack Exchange sites. You can find the directory needed, along with simple instructions at this GitHub Post

Go and enjoy!

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