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Who gets to decide what the final content of a post is? Can I edit the edits?

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  • The post in question (I assume): stackoverflow.com/posts/26209346/revisions – John Palmer Oct 6 '14 at 4:55
  • Yes. The person that posted the other answer got my original answer deleted, and then used my original answer as the basis for their answer. – 7stud Oct 6 '14 at 4:57
  • @howaboutNO, Hi. :) – 7stud Jan 22 '15 at 1:51
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The general answer is: Yes, you can roll back edits on your posts if you disagree with them. Most of the time, the person suggesting the edit will respect the roll-back of the OP, and leave it alone.

If they disagree with your roll-back, and apply the edit again, we have what's commonly called an "edit war". Simply applying the edit again will not be productive. As you can easily recognize as a poster on a programming site, you're likely to enter an infinite loop. And simply changing the post back and forth until somebody gets tired is silly.

You can try leaving a comment explaining to the editor why you disagree with the edit. If no consensus can be reached, it's time to get a moderator involved. Flag the post, ask them to make a call, and accept whatever they decide.

Now, since the specific post that apparently triggered your question was revealed in the comments (https://stackoverflow.com/a/26209346/3530129), this was a different case. The edit you disagree with was made by a moderator, who removed content from your post that was not consistent with site policies. At this point, I think it would have been best to accept this decision, and move on.

Well, the next step if you really can't accept the moderator decision is to post here, which is what you did. I don't share your point of view that @animuson did anything questionable in this case. Accusing others of stealing your answers should really not be part of an answer. Removing that part of your answer seems completely appropriate, and did not hurt the technical merit of your answer, which is all that really counts on this site.

About the deletion of your original answer, which was at the start of this whole mess: I can see where you were going with it, and why you would consider it an answer. But to a casual observer, it does look like it's merely a clarifying question to the OP. Even if they recognize your intention, there's very little "meat" to it. Really useful answers should explain, and not only give hints with rhetorical questions. You would probably agree that your newer answer provided a lot more value, so rejecting your original answer looks like it had a positive outcome.

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