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Twice in the past week I have had to flag my own answer on Stack Overflow to get a moderator's assistance, because I wanted to delete my own answer and couldn't because it had been accepted.

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This restriction - you cannot delete your own answer if it has been accepted - is wrong.

  • If I want to give up the rep from acceptance, that is my business and nobody else's.

  • Acceptance is no big deal; it could be wrong, or clutching at straws. Why should it limit my control over my own answer?

  • Just because my answer was accepted, that is no reason why I should be perpetually tied to a stake like St. Sebastian to have arrows shot into me week after week by disgruntled users. There is nothing about mere acceptance that should freeze an answer in place like this, forcing me to lose rep for the rest of my days.

  • We are allowed, nay encouraged to delete an answer that keeps getting downvoted; you get a badge for doing so! Yet if someone has accepted that answer, you can't do that? That makes no sense.

  • Making me appeal to a moderator for such an easy and minor thing is a big waste of everybody's time.

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    You could simply have it disassociated from you. That's a right you have under the CC-BY-SA license. – Bart Oct 5 '14 at 14:09
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    @Bart And then we are back to square one - I have to bother a moderator. I'm looking for a clean no-moderator solution. I should just be able to click Delete and move on. – matt Oct 5 '14 at 14:23
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    There is a feature request somewhere to have this disassociation be automatic. Let me have a look. You could support that. – Bart Oct 5 '14 at 14:25
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    In the early days of the site there was much more emphasis on accept rate and I suspect this policy may originate from that. – Martin Smith Oct 5 '14 at 14:33
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    Here's an old post on MSE requesting the same thing: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/14932/…. You're in good company! – Reto Koradi Oct 5 '14 at 15:29
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    Posting an answer at SO can be a lot like teen-age sex. Ten minutes of fun and then you'll have to support it for the rest of your life. – Hans Passant Oct 5 '14 at 16:26
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    Just edit your answer. – neuronet Oct 6 '14 at 1:24
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    @R..: the OP should be notified if their accepted answer is deleted. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 6 '14 at 3:38
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    Badges don't necessarily "encourage" what they're awarded for. E.g. Tumbleweed hardly encourages people to post questions that go unanswered for a long time. – sehe Oct 6 '14 at 6:56
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    @AndrewThompson you misunderstand; the answers I wanted to delete were correct. The crowd of arrow shooters were wrong. But it wasn't a battle worth fighting. – matt Oct 6 '14 at 13:41
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    It's one thing to want to delete an answer because you later discovered it was "wrong", but I have a problem with a user deleting an answer that is correct (accepted or not) because they don't like the reaction from the peanut gallery. Then there is the gray area where an answer is somewhat mediocre but it so happens that it was close enough to help the OP, and perhaps other users. Should we really let the answer be yanked, perhaps hurting the OP who is relying on being able to refer back to it in the future? – Euro Micelli Oct 6 '14 at 16:48
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    @HarryJohnston while that does actually make downvotes not penalize you anymore, it also makes upvotes not count for you. As an aside, low-quality CW answers can be deleted just like other answers... – Vogel612 Oct 7 '14 at 8:52
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    A negatively voted answer can be deleted even if accepted, so this really only applies to positively voted answers, which i suspect is a far less common occurrence. If the answer is highly upvoted, it clearly was helpful to a large quantity of people and should be improved instead of deleted. if it only has a few upvotes, you can coordinate with other users through chat or comments to get it downvoted so that it can be deleted by the community. – Kevin B Oct 7 '14 at 15:10
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I agree with you.

None of the workarounds suggested so far are particularly appealing when you know for a fact the answer you had submitted is wrong.

Certainly it happens often enough that the person asking the question will accept a feasible looking but incorrect answer.

Disassociating it from your account or making it CW still leaves the noise up there. Often a competing correct answer has been submitted and will appear at the top once the misleading accepted answer has been removed.

I don't really buy the explanation that it is to prevent deletion of useful content. It makes no sense if that was the aim that you can delete a +100 answer that was not accepted, but not a negatively voted answer that a single person accepted.

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    Agree. Even if someone would abuse this to delete valuable content, the deleted answer can still be seen by +10k users - so it's not really lost. – BartoszKP Oct 5 '14 at 15:03
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    @BartoszKP and there are already measures in place to rate limit deletions and auto raise a flag if someone self deletes many items of content. – Martin Smith Oct 5 '14 at 15:05
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    @BartoszKP: it is rare enough that leaving deletion of such posts to moderators is fine. If the OP flags for moderator attention explaining that the answer is plain wrong and they'd want to have it removed, that'll be taken into consideration. – Martijn Pieters Oct 5 '14 at 15:44
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    Yeah, as I've handled these flags I've begun to wonder why this is a restriction. We already have tools for dealing with rage-quits, and can easily undelete the answer if people want to overturn the poster's decision. All it does is annoy people wanting to remove their no-longer-correct answer. – Brad Larson Oct 5 '14 at 16:07
  • " I don't really buy the explanation that it is to prevent deletion of useful content.". Even so, "delete" action could become unusable after o fixed period of time after posting an answer. If the author realizes that his answer is wrong, most likely that will happen in a few hours at most. – Alexandru Guzinschi Oct 7 '14 at 12:18
  • @AlexandruG. - Why? What is the motivation to prevent this? Why not assume by default that if the answerer wants to delete it that they must have a good reason? Why should accepted answers be treated differently from other answers in this respect? – Martin Smith Oct 7 '14 at 12:50
  • @MartinSmith Rage delete maybe ? I don't know what tools are available for moderators, but if they can recover a deleted answer, than yes, my suggestion has no sense. – Alexandru Guzinschi Oct 7 '14 at 13:12
  • @AlexandruG. - Yeah, we can undelete any deleted answer (aside from those that have been burned from the database due to private information being exposed), and 10k+ users can vote to undelete these as long as it wasn't a moderator who deleted them. We're automatically notified if a user deletes a number of their posts in a row, so we can catch rage quits as they happen. – Brad Larson Oct 7 '14 at 23:31
  • @BradLarson That's awesome! In that case my suggestion has no sense. I would like to be posible to delete my own accepted answer in the future. I've seen a few times accepted answers with negative score and this possibility could come in handy. – Alexandru Guzinschi Oct 8 '14 at 5:24
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    Re. "when you know for a fact the answer you had submitted is wrong" In this particular case, the OP states that "the answers I wanted to delete were correct." – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Oct 9 '14 at 17:20
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Aside from the possibility of having your own answer deleted, which is difficult for the reasons you outlined, there's always the possibility of editing your own answer.

I know of answers, that changed quite a lot over the course of time. (unfortunately no examples handy)

If you know that your own answer is incorrect I assume you know the correct answer - or someone else posted it already. You can then do something that I personally haven't done yet, but I've seen people do it:

Edit your own answer to be correct.

If you take the information used in your answer from another answer you may want to give proper attribution, If you feel you don't deserve the reputation you would gain from correcting your answer with the work of someone else, you can make the answer Community Wiki.

I think this approach is the easier way around this definitely problematic restriction (for such kind of question - answer pairs)

If the answer has become obsolete over the course of time, you can always edit in a obsoleteness disclaimer...

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    I honestly feel this just avoids the question. Sometimes you can edit a better answer, but if someone else has already given it there's no reason to steal the credit. This is a non-solution. – Veedrac Oct 7 '14 at 10:46
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    @Veedrac well leaving it standing as incorrect accepted answer is even worse IMO. Additionally there's the possiblity of giving correct credit (as you should anyways :D). I think this is the lesser of two evils, but hey, pick your poison... – Vogel612 Oct 7 '14 at 10:48
  • I agree that editing should be the first line of defense for a bad answer, but this only covers so many scenarios. The OP should have the opportunity to delete or disassociate without intervention. I think it is beneficial if users are cleaning up their own noise. If the community feels it should remain on the site, then it is their right to vote to override the user. – Crackertastic Apr 21 '15 at 13:05
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I've only just discovered this myself and it definitely feels like a silly restriction.

The two worst accepted answers on Stack Overflow come from Darin Dimitrov (71 downvotes) and CommonsWare (68 downvotes). I mention their names specifically, because these two users have a combined reputation of over 1 million. I'm sure both of these users are pretty annoyed that those answers leave a permanent mark on their profiles.

It's one thing to want to delete an answer because you later discovered it was "wrong", but I have a problem with a user deleting an answer that is correct (accepted or not) because they don't like the reaction from the peanut gallery. Then there is the gray area where an answer is somewhat mediocre but it so happens that it was close enough to help the OP, and perhaps other users. Should we really let the answer be yanked, perhaps hurting the OP who is relying on being able to refer back to it in the future?

Euro Micelli

This argument is a bit moot as quite often there are multiple good answers submitted and the accepted answer isn't necessarily the best answer. By this logic we should also be preventing all answers from being deleted as well.

Quite often users are happy with what they get. They'll accept the first answer submitted even if it doesn't fully address the problem they're having - or, in the case of Darin Dimitrov and CommonsWare above, it turns out to be a wrong answer altogether.

My top rated answer has almost 1,000 upvotes, but it isn't accepted. I can delete it if I want to. Why should the accepted state of an answer even be considered when the validity and quality of answers given is a community effort?

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