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I had a question here which was (sadly) deleted by the community. It was (in my opinion) well-formed, had plenty of technical detail, and was a valid django/python/heroku question. It even ended up getting a specific answer as a comment, but after the question had been downvoted to -2, and closed as "off-topic" by four different users.

My domain was/is: http://areyouafuckingidiot.com - the domain name was/is supposed to be intentionally aggressive, but (otherwise) I was not otherwise aggressive in the post. The first commenter said in his comment "I'm not going to click on that link, no matter how hard you try to convince me that it's not malicious." which I feel set the tone for downvotes - link to the deleted post: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18094545/why-would-a-csrf-token-only-be-set-occasionally-on-heroku-django

Additionally, the problem related to the difference between the server settings and the live running code, which was why I needed to link to the live running domain (to demonstrate the irregularity of the problem).

My biggest issue was there was absolutely no way to appeal my down-vote/deletion.

** UPDATE ** The issue was a year ago, and I got the nature of the question wrong. I have updated the text, as it was still an issue in which I could not present code.

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    IS the name of the domain important? why not use example.com and move on? People will use their downvotes however they see fit unfortunately, and flagging due to downvote use isn't going to result in any action unless voter fraud is happening. – Kevin B Sep 30 '14 at 18:45
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    How do you know that the downvotes were because of the domain name? What do you mean by "moderated by four different moderators? Why did you feel the need to include your domain name in the first place? Wouldn't example.com have been better no matter what your real one is? – Josh Caswell Sep 30 '14 at 18:45
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    The problem was/is that the issue was appearing on the domain itself, and could be debugged live (it was a javascript <-> Django issue). – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 18:45
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    debugging live is almost always a bad idea, since once you fix it it will no longer be able to be debugged live. – Kevin B Sep 30 '14 at 18:46
  • Sorry, I should have specified. It wasn't only debugging live - it was where a live running example could be seen. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 18:49
  • @JoshCaswell because at least one (I believe two) of the moderators pointed at the domain name as an issue. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 18:51
  • There were no "moderators ♦" involved there; they were normal users. – Andrew Barber Sep 30 '14 at 18:52
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    The question has three downvotes in total, and one upvote, for a final score of -2. You say that it was voted to -5. Were votes removed at some point? – Josh Caswell Sep 30 '14 at 18:53
  • @JoshCaswell I'm not sure - it was a year ago, and I seem to remember it going as low as -5, but honestly cannot be sure. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:01
  • @AndrewBarber that's my fault, I remembered it wrong. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:01
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Simple solution: Don't use the domain name in your question. http://example.com would do fine here.

If your question depended on people following the link, your question was not of the quality standard we are looking for. Your question should stand on its own without relying on external sites.

You should produce a reproduceable sample in the question itself instead.

  • Can you specify "quality standard"? Are NFSW terms not of the quality standard? To be clear, I believe (though I can't see in my history) I called out the specific blurbs, but included the domain just to show the issue running live. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 18:48
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    @aronchick: I am not talking about the NSFW nature of the domain. I am talking about the question being useful to others, not just you. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 18:49
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    @KevinB: that's nonsense. I include live samples in regex answers, but as an extra service, in addition to the full solution, explanation and static demo session. I've yet to be downvoted for that. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 18:50
  • That seems new to me - I guess I wasn't aware that including additional linkage to help people give answers/context would result in a down vote. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 18:50
  • @aronchick: if your answer could stand on its own without the live link, why not just remove the link then? All other things being equal, adding in a live demo link is not going to get you downvoted. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 18:51
  • Maybe that misses the point i was trying to make. Point is, people will downvote for reasons that don't always make sense, or may not be appropriate. – Kevin B Sep 30 '14 at 18:52
  • @KevinB: then say that instead. However, when you get multiple downvotes and comments with directed criticism, we are no longer talking about random 'because I lost my keys' downvotes. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 18:52
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    @aronchick: seeing the deleted post, I see no evidence of a reproducible sample in that question. The post was closed after you removed the link. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 18:54
  • @MartijnPieters true, but I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that the link/votes (which occurred when I had the link up) was the reason that it ultimately got deleted. This question spurs a different question - there was simply no running code to include, on dev & staging, my CSRF token was appearing, and on live occasionally, it was appearing. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:05
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    @aronchick: until you can reproduce the issue, Stack Overflow is not the best venue to ask for help then. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 19:05
  • @MartijnPieters I'm not sure I agree completely. In this particular case, it was the ideal place to ask the question. The user helped out, gave me an answer, and, if it was still public, would provide a useful resource in perpetuity for all users who saw the same kind of sporadic CSRF token appearance. Is it the case that irregularly appearing issues should not be discussed here? – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:08
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    @aronchick: the general advice you were given in the comments is also present in other Django posts, I'm sure. Getting a reproducable test case is part of the skill of asking a good question. – Martijn Pieters Sep 30 '14 at 19:11
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    @aronchick I take it that you are saying that the comments by dan-klasson were helpful. Looking at the comments, they are all about how to code your application. So if these comments contain the solution, then your problem was in fact a coding problem. Also, note how dan-klasson keeps having to hypothesize as to what the solution might be and keeps having to refine or propose new things. The requirement for code right from the start is to help avoid this kind of back and forth where asker and answerer slowly converge towards something that addresses the actual problem. – Louis Sep 30 '14 at 19:16
  • I'm happy to ask a new question if necessary, but it leads to a new question - when something is only appearing on Heroku, and is irregularly appearing at that, how would you reproduce/include the problem in the question? If I could reproduce it regularly, then I'd have the answer, right? – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:16
  • @louis I certainly understand but that's the issue. It still boggles my mind that including that extra code helped at all, because, as stated in the question, the CSRF token DID appear - just irregularly. The actual nature of the question was related to some insight into a Heroku caching (which I still believe was the root cause). – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:21
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supposed to be intentionally aggressive

And you got back what you put in. Are you really surprised?

If so, consider this a lesson in human behavior. If not, then you already knew better and did it anyway - congratulations on getting exactly what you asked for.

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    To be clear, the name of the domain is aggressive - not the question. I wasn't suggesting anything about the people reading that question. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:13
  • That's the problem with names; they tend to get used in lots of different contexts. I'll bet the guys from Abbott & Costello's baseball team had a real hard time when they called customer support hotlines... – Shog9 Sep 30 '14 at 19:16
  • I suppose. Saying "Here is the domain: foobar.com" doesn't seem very aggressive to me. – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:33
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    +1. @aronchick - I see no reasons why one would explicitly add reasons to downvote to own post. F-words looks non-professional and childish in addition to trying to be unpleasant - and tip perception of author as less likely to be cooperative. This is especially the case for borderline off-topic posts like sample you have - you want to tip the scale toward "this person put an effort and question is just hard - comment", not to "author is unlikely to be nice, and unlikely to improve question - downvote/close". – Alexei Levenkov Oct 1 '14 at 2:49
  • To be clear, I did not have any vulgarity in the entire post, other than the text of the domain name. Can you help me understand why you consider it off-topic? As I mentioned, it was my assessment that there was no code to post (as I detailed in the question), specifically because the system DID work - just irregularly. – aronchick Oct 1 '14 at 20:57
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This is the close reason for your question:

"Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself.

Your question does not seem to have ever contained the code relevant to your problem. Instead, you provided a link to your web site. This, quite irrespective of the domain name of your site, is sufficient grounds for downvotes and closure.

Providing a link in addition to the code relevant to your problem won't generally cause downvotes and closure. Although I'd advise against using domain names that make it look like you are making a joke at the expense of the reader.

I see no evidence that downvotes were unwarranted or that moderators misbehaved. (It does not seem that moderators were involved at all, actually.)

  • Correct, I was wrong, and updated the question. The biggest issue was/is there was no code to include - it was ONLY happening on Heroku (and irregularly). – aronchick Sep 30 '14 at 19:02

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