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In Java 7, a new feature was added to Java that allows underscores to be placed within numeric literals in order to improve the readability of them. However, the Java code highlighting on SO is not properly treating numeric literals with underscores as numeric literals.

Right now, Java numeric literals show up as red to stand out from what surrounds it. However, when an underscore is used in such a numeric literal, only the part to the left of the first underscore is highlighted as red; the rest of the number is just black. Whenever this new feature is used in SO code, it should be the entire numeric literal that is highlighted, not just the first part of it.

Since the author of Prettify does not seem to update the project that often, this is a request for someone to upload a patch to fix it. Once that is done, I'll change this request to one that asks SE to update to the newer revision.

Example: https://stackoverflow.com/a/26102093

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    Related: What is syntax highlighting and how does it work? tl;dr: StackExchange uses Google Prettify. When someone fixes it in Google Prettify, it'll be fixed here. – vcsjones Sep 30 '14 at 16:51
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    Relevant issue on Prettify's issue tracker: code.google.com/p/google-code-prettify/issues/detail?id=353 – gparyani Sep 30 '14 at 19:10
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    Hahaha. Numeric literals? For C#, half of features don't work (and if they do, they're working wrong) and no one gives a damn. Even something as simple as XML highlighting fails in deeply nested files. – Athari Sep 30 '14 at 20:58
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    What an odd feature... – canon Sep 30 '14 at 21:28
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    @canon, I wish it were more common. First saw it when using Ada in 1991. adacore.com/adaanswers/gems/ada-gem-7 And I know Eiffel supports numeric literals with underscores. docs.eiffel.com/book/method/… – Shannon Severance Sep 30 '14 at 21:53
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    @Athari You should report those issues like damryfbfnetsi did here, and you may find those problems resolved in the near future. – Conspicuous Compiler Sep 30 '14 at 22:17
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    @ShannonSeverance: It's gaining on, Rust has it too for example. – Matthieu M. Oct 1 '14 at 6:52
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    @MatthieuM. Ruby also has it. Its use is recommended by a very popular Ruby style guide. – Andrew Grimm Oct 1 '14 at 7:18
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    @AndrewGrimm Why someone would want to write 1_000_000 instead of 1E6 is beyond my understanding. – Roland Oct 1 '14 at 13:06
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    @Roland it'd look too similar to IE6! – Andrew Grimm Oct 1 '14 at 13:08
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    It would make more sense for 0x3B9A_CA00 although I don't know if that's valid in Java (0x3B9A'CA00 is valid in C++14) – MSalters Oct 1 '14 at 13:08
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    @MSalters Looking at the examples in the docs linked in the question, that appears to have been the intent behind adding the feature – Izkata Oct 1 '14 at 15:18
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    Very sad that some are closing this when it's obviously not a dupe of that question. – Lance Roberts Oct 13 '14 at 21:43
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    @ThisSuitIsBlackNot, Maybe we should have a canonical prettify bug question, and dupe that one. The linked dupe isn't that. – Lance Roberts Oct 13 '14 at 23:29
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    @LanceRoberts: the dupe is exactly that. The FAQ addresses the issue directly. – Martijn Pieters Oct 14 '14 at 9:14

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