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It's not clear to me what's unclear about this question: How to block OpenProcess or WriteProcessMemory for my process?.

The person provided the same question in both the title and the body:

How to block OpenProcess or WriteProcessMemory for my process?

I think the folks on Stack Overflow incorrectly closed the question because they objected to why he was trying to do it.

I don't believe there was anything ambiguous about what he is asking. But I've done it before myself, so I might have some insight into the issue. I also provided the code I use in my projects. Its non-trivial, and it would be nice if it was available to others who have the same concerns.

The question potentially could have been closed as too broad since the code is non-trivial. However, the community did not make that observation (apparently no one commenting has written that code). Plus, the question has an answer with the code so its hard to complain about that now.

Is there anything that can be done to help the poster? He's new to the site, and it would be nice if this did not apply: Could we please be a bit nicer to new users?.

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    The comments below the question seem to indicate there is enough room for clarification. – Bart Sep 25 '14 at 16:13
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    @Bart - In the context the author provided (effectively DRM), its irrelevant. He does not want his process opened. Its does not matter where its coming from. – jww Sep 25 '14 at 16:15
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    @jww C'mon, are you serious? – πάντα ῥεῖ Sep 25 '14 at 16:17
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    @jww Sounds like you're simply choosing one interpretation based on what you assume the OP wants. That doesn't make the question unclear, as that clarifying information should be in the question, rather than forcing readers to make a lot of assumptions about what is actually being asked. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:18
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    If you think that the question is too broad then why did you answer it? – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:18
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    @jww The actual intent of the author is unclear, as the comments are discussing. It seems that pretty much all of the readers feel that the literal question that he asked isn't really want he wants to have. Spending a whole bunch of time answering a question that doesn't actually represent the problem at hand, and that doesn't actually solve that problem, is just wasting the time of everyone involved. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:30
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    @jww: But "spending a whole bunch of time answering a question that doesn't actually represent the problem at hand, and that doesn't actually solve that problem, is just wasting the time of everyone involved" is not a ridiculous leap. It happens all the time. – Robert Harvey Sep 25 '14 at 16:37
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    @jww So you think that there's no indication in the question that he's looking to actually prevent the memory of his process from being manipulated, rather than merely to trap these two method calls? Because your answer clearly shows the opposite. Your answer goes into detail about different ways of accessing memory, different possible malicious behaviors to be dealt with, etc. You simply made assumptions about what the actual problem was, and used that as the basis of your answer, more or less ignoring the literal question asked. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:41
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    @jww You made all sorts of assumptions about the question. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but not even recognizing that you're making them most certainly is a serious problem. The vast majority of your answer isn't even talking about any of the points in the question; it's explaining entirely separate problems that he needs to worry about and then attempting to solve them. How is that not making assumptions? It looks like a rather small percentage of your answer is actually answering the question that was asked; most of it appears to be answering what you think his real problems are. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:49
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    @jww And that is making assumptions. It's making assumptions about the actual problem, that this information is relevant, etc. None of that information is in the question, which means that you assumed all of that information. It sounds like you don't know what an assumption actually is... – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 17:02
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    @jww You're the one saying that all that's relevant is the literal question that is asked, that we shouldn't be inquiring as to what the actual problem is, etc. My point, that you apparently can't understand, is that your own answer is doing everything that your meta comments are saying shouldn't be done. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 17:19
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    @jww Yes, and to make that comprehensive answer you were forced to make all sorts of assumptions (despite refusing that you've made them). Other people wanted to ensure that the question itself actually contained enough information to write a quality answer without needing to make all sorts of assumptions. When a question doesn't contain enough information to post a quality answer without making a whole lot of assumptions we use the close reason "unclear" to indicate that the question needs to provide more information. You just choose to guess instead. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 17:28
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    None of the interaction that is currently visible on that question is "not nice" or "abusive". (Perhaps there are comments that have been deleted, I don't know.) Please stop thinking of question closure as somehow offensive. – Josh Caswell Sep 25 '14 at 19:15
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    What?! Editing for grammar is not persecution. That's a seriously weird view. Good grammar makes the question more useful for everybody who sees it (not to mention acting as ESL instruction for the OP). People usually use downvotes to indicate that they don't think a question is useful. Some voters thought that such a terse, un-researched, and (as they judged -- I know you don't agree) unclear question would not be useful to others. – Josh Caswell Sep 25 '14 at 19:36
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    @Robert - sorry, I don't use chat. – jww Sep 25 '14 at 20:25
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You already did help the poster by answering his question.

Closing is sometimes a judgment call. But once a question has been adequately answered (within the context of the question that was asked), whether the question remains open or not should be irrelevant to the asker.

Good answers don't necessarily redeem bad questions. That said, I don't see anything particularly wrong with the question at hand. I think people don't like it because it contains some invalid assumptions, one of which is that his protection scheme is actually going to work. But that's not what he asked. He asked how to do something, and he asked it in a way which should be well within the scope of a Q&A.

A good answer would describe how to do it, and then explain why it's not a good idea.

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    I don't care if I get downvoted for disagreeing with the community. It happens often, and I have a lot of fans. However, I take exception when new users are abused. That poor fellow did not deserve that treatment from the community. If the members of the community don't feel like answering or don't know the answer, then they should simply move on. – jww Sep 25 '14 at 16:42
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    I looked again, but I don't see much abuse there. People need to stop thinking of downvotes and close votes as abusive, unless they are being used in an abusive way. Sure, you thought the question was perfectly clear, but it's the user community that makes that determination, not any one person. – Robert Harvey Sep 25 '14 at 16:44
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    @jww You think informing him that his question lacks details, providing constructive comments to help determine what it is that he's really asking, attempting to avoid answers to the question until it has been adequately clarified, and pointing to some outside resources that can help him understand the gravity of the question that he's asking is treatment that he didn't deserve? A number of people (besides you) spend time trying to help him out. Informing him (constructively) that his question is currently lacking and needs improvement is an important part of that process. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 16:45
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    @jww "If the members of the community don't feel like answering or don't know the answer, then they should simply move on". You're absolutely right. And, by extension, if they don't feel it's appropriate for the site, they should vote to close it. That's how the system is designed to work; people earn privileges as they get more involved (and thus more familiar) with how the site operates, and they're free to exercise their judgement with those privileges. The (small) majority just happen to disagree with you about this question – Clive Sep 25 '14 at 16:57
  • @Servy - "you think informing him that his question lacks details..." - his question does not lack detail. He provided context and asked a clear and concise question. I apologize (for him and myself) that its not the question you {hoped|wished} he would have asked. – jww Sep 25 '14 at 19:32
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    @jww You only don't feel that the question lacks detail because you made a whole pile of assumptions when answering the question. Rather than asking the OP to clarify his question with enough information to answer it, you just made a whole lot of guess as to what he was doing and answered based on all of those assumptions. That's a very strong sign that the question is lacking in detail. The fact that you don't care that you had to make a whole bunch of assumptions to answer the question doesn't mean that it's not lacking in detail. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 19:36
  • @Servy - again, I did not make any assumptions. First, I answered his question. Then, I provided additional information based on the context he provided. No assumptions were necessary. As someone with subject matter expertise, I did not need to make no assumptions. Apparently, those who lacked the expertise assumed some assumptions (???). – jww Sep 25 '14 at 19:47
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    @jww I've already explained to you what assumptions you've made. Just saying that you didn't make them doesn't make it true. Having subject matter expertise doesn't mean you didn't make assumptions, it means that your assumptions are more likely to be correct, and that you're more likely to be able to make assumptions in the first place. A correct assumption is still an assumption. You seem to have only confirmed to me that you don't actually understand what an assumption actually is. – Servy Sep 25 '14 at 19:52
  • @ Servy - like I said, I made no assumption. I answered based on the information provided in the question, and the question itself. If my answer did not thoroughly answer his question and address some of the issues related to the context provided, then you should flag it for removal. – jww Sep 25 '14 at 20:01
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    @jww If the question is clear to you, but apparently not clear to other intelligent people who have voted to close it, then perhaps the better solution would be for you to edit the question. If you get it, you're in the best position to make it more clear for everyone else. That's far more productive than arguing about it on Meta. Honestly, I could go either way on this. I probably wouldn't have voted to close it, but in its current state, I wouldn't vote to re-open either. You can change that. – Cody Gray Sep 26 '14 at 3:35

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