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Is it acceptable to add criteria for answers inside your question?

I've recently started using sharepoint.stackexchange.com and have found many of the answers do not answer the question but rather offer advice along the lines of 'You should do it this way instead.' See this question and answers as an example.

I know a well phrased and specific question should help prevent non-answer answers but I can't help but feel no matter how well a question is asked there will still be some users who offer answers that are not answers.

I don't want to sound ungrateful to those offering advice and guidance but sometimes I just want the answer to my question and I think SO would be a better place if that is what I got. Is it acceptable to add to my question criteria like 'Answer that recommend another approach will not be accepted, please stick to answering the specific issue.' ?

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    Why didn't you ask this on the Sharepoint meta or Meta Stack Exchange? As worded, this is only tangentially applicable to Stack Overflow. – ChrisF Sep 22 '14 at 10:24
  • @ChrisF I didn't notice sharepoint had its own Meta as well (as mentioned I've just started using it) however I think the question can be applied to all SO questions; sharepoint just happens to have a greater proportion of it from what I've seen so far. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 22 '14 at 11:36
  • @gnat useless? Surely all answerers are first off readers so it can save a lot of time providing answer that aren't going to be helpful. Why have someone first spend 30min writing an answer just to say it isn't what I was looking for when I can give a heads up first. Also it saves future readers having to read through N answers that don't answer the question. I appreciate your response, just think 'useless' isn't the case. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 22 '14 at 11:45
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    Sometimes people ask for something that can be achieved much easier using a different approach... – user2140173 Sep 22 '14 at 12:18
  • Indeed @vba4all and sometimes people have or want to use a certain approach and need answers to how they can do it, not why they shouldn't or how they can do it a different way. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 22 '14 at 13:57
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    @RyanfaeScotland that's true. I just think that your statement sounds a bit harsh like the community may not like it. maybe something like "I realize I can achieve X using Y but I am currently restricted to Z approach so please take that into consideration when answering" – user2140173 Sep 22 '14 at 13:59
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    @vba4all "I realize I can achieve X using Y <brief explanation for this> but I am currently restricted to Z" -- something like this would repel irrelevant answers without any additional restrictions. I for one vote down answers that repeat what is already covered in the question in a heartbeat, and don't even hesitate to flag for moderator to delete if repetition is particularly blatant – gnat Sep 22 '14 at 15:51
  • @vba4all - Nice, I like the way that is worded. I think a lot of people are getting very hung up on the way I've worded it rather than what I am trying to achieve. Wow, lots of downvotes and no explanations why. Is my question 'bad' or are people downvoting because they are upset with the content I am looking for clarity on? – RyanfaeScotland Sep 23 '14 at 7:23
  • @RyanfaeScotland voting on MSE is different from SO. Voting here usually expresses agreement/disagreement with the general idea...don't worry much about it – user2140173 Sep 23 '14 at 7:28
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This idea goes against the core of what Stack Overflow (and Stack Exchange) is about.

I don't want to sound ungrateful to those offering advice and guidance but sometimes I just want the answer to my question and I think SO would be a better place if that is what I got. Is it acceptable to add to my question criteria like 'Answer that recommend another approach will not be accepted, please stick to answering the specific issue.' ?

You are under a misconception if you think that answering the question is solving the problem for the OP. Questions are designed to be questions about a specific problem that all programmers may face and answers are supposed to help everyone who has the same question.

While your specific requirements and approach may be what you want and you don't want to hear anything else except a solution for your specific approach, other users who face the same (or similar problems) that find your question via searching may find the alternative solutions valuable. You are certainly welcome to explain why you may have a specific requirement or have to follow a specific approach in an effort to encourage specific answers, it shouldn't be used to stop someone from providing a different solution for other users.

Effectively, as the original asker, you can decide how to cast your vote on answers and select which answer best answers your specific question, you do not have the right to tell answers not to provide alternative solutions because they aren't just answering the question for you.

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    This is the correct answer imho as I am being too myopic in the responses I am looking for and not thinking of the bigger community picture. I can guide answers with the "I realize I can achieve X using Y but I am currently restricted to Z" approach and use my OP mark as correct answer powers to show what I was looking for along with comments to continue guiding. Thanks. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 23 '14 at 7:59
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Regarding statements such as,

Answer that recommend another approach will not be accepted, please stick to answering the specific issue.

My own take on this is that to be overly restrictive and to seem demanding (even if that's not the intent) on a site that gives free advice is probably not the right way to go. Rather than use a stick, go with the carrot approach. If none of the answers you've received are felt to be adequate then when the time permits, add a bounty to your question as that's exactly what it's for.

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  • Indeed I could add some syntactic sugar and say 'I know there are other ways to implement this but I am looking specifically at a solution based round the described.' or similar to be a bit nicer but regardless of how it is presented I'm wondering if it is ok to present it at all. Thanks for the input. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 22 '14 at 11:48
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The other answers present here are excellent, but I have one thought to add as well. In my experience, programming questions are susceptible to the XY Problem. It's a trap that I've fallen into before, and I'd be willing to bet that most programmers have hit it at some point. Placing premature constraints on your potential answers may exclude a much better solution to your problem.

You should always accept the answer that solved the problem best for your needs, but I think you would be doing the community a disservice by discouraging answers that may help other readers with the same problem but more flexibility in the implementation of a solution.

I think placing technical requirements on answers is fine, such as OS, language, or compiler/interpreter versions, but outside-of-the-box solutions should be encouraged as long as they solve the problem presented in the question. You can always downvote answers that are so far out your box that they wouldn't be useful to future readers.

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  • ++ I like what you have said and now I am thinking why was too-localized removed from close reasons... – user2140173 Sep 23 '14 at 7:32
  • @SLawson - See I'm always (or try to be) aware of the XY Problem as you put it and take this into account before asking. If I ask how to get the most Vitamin C from my apple trees, I don't need the world telling me I should have planted oranges, chances are I know this and there are reasons why I'm not. But this is very specific and you are right, it would be more beneficial to the community to have all options from Vitamin C procurement open and I can opt to choose the one that best fits my requirements as the correct answer. – RyanfaeScotland Sep 23 '14 at 7:47
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Remember that the purpose of this site is not to help you. Its to help everyone. If the correct answer to a question is to do X, that should be the answer regardless of if you like X or not. By not giving the answer X we actually make the site less useful for anyone who stumbles on your question in the future. In addition, it makes you sound like an entitled ass. You're not only asking for help, but demanding it be be provided in the way you want. Telling me not to give a certain answer means I will either downvote your question, answer exactly in the way you tell me not to and call you an idiot for not doing it that way, or vote to close if I find any problem with the question.

Now if you have a good reason for not accepting another answer type and explain why politely and appologetically(perhaps you're working around a patent, or you're not allowed to change a schema due to company idiocy), I'll forego that. Or if you say you tried it and couldn't make it work (although I may instead decide to show you how to make it work). But otherwise you're using the site wrong.

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  • So (to use my analogy in another comment) if I ask how to get the most Vitamin C from my apple trees you would be happier answering if I explained the trees are already planted and matured and hence I can't use oranges even though it is a much better way of getting Vitamin C. If I just said, 'Please stick to only apple trees and not oranges.' you'd downvote, answer oranges and call me an ass? – RyanfaeScotland Sep 23 '14 at 7:55
  • Yes, because you're doing something stupid. When you're complaining about a headache because you're banging your head against a wall "stop doing that" is the correct response. If you're in some weird circumstances where you have to continue its on you to explain that. Otherwise I'm going to give the correct response which is to ignore your request, because 98% of the time the person doesn't have a valid reason for doing things the hard ways and needs to be educated. – Gabe Sechan Sep 24 '14 at 17:13

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