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I recently posted a question where I was forced to format a non-code section as code in order to post the question. There's some output from a console program, which I had formatted as a block quote... since that's what it is, but I had to go back and replace the >'s with spaces.

I tried to edit it afterward to fix it, but I wasn't allowed to submit the edit because of the same warning.

The warning says right in it that my question "appears" to contain code that is not formatted correctly. Well, appearances can be deceiving and the validator appears to have been deceived.

Can you override this warning with more rep and I just don't know about it yet? If so, it would significantly reduce my frustration level if that was part of the message.

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    @MatthewLundberg Because four spaces is for code and > is for block quotes. It's not code, so it shouldn't be formatted as code. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 3:55
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    I disagree. Output from the program should be formatted as code so a monospace font is used. A block quote with > uses a variable-width font. – Matthew Lundberg Sep 11 '14 at 3:55
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    @DCShannon: no, that sort of output should be put in code blocks. > is for quotes/citations of English (or other natural language) text. – Mat Sep 11 '14 at 3:57
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    @Mat Well then we disagree, and I don't see any meta question to that effect, but it's really beside the point. Even if you don't agree about how this particular bit of text should be formatted, the question is about overriding a warning in the situation where it is incorrect. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:04
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    But in this case, it isn't incorrect. The warning is preventing you from doing the wrong thing. – Matthew Lundberg Sep 11 '14 at 4:05
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    @MatthewLundberg Once again, I disagree, and once again, that's beside the point. The title of the question is not "How should this be formatted?" – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:06
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    So find an example where you aren't allowed to quote natural-language text with >, and ask about that. – Matthew Lundberg Sep 11 '14 at 4:07
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    @MatthewLundberg If someone shared with me the algorithm that determines when that warning shows up, then I expect I could provide you with such an example. I'm more concerned about a text parser telling me what sort of text I've written and not being able to react as a human with my own judgement than I am about this particular instance of it occurring. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:09
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    But you haven't found such an example. Until you do, there is no meaning to your question. – Matthew Lundberg Sep 11 '14 at 4:10
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    @MatthewLundberg What? It's a question about a general principle and you're trying to make it about a specific instance. Are you saying you can prove that the text parser would never be wrong simply because I haven't shown you an instance of it doing so (in your opinion)? All you have to do is allow for the possibility of an error in a piece of software and the question has meaning. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:12
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    @DCShannon: You are ignoring the other side of this equation, which is dozens of questions posed by newcomers every day that don't format their code as code. You're saying we should ignore that very real problem because we can't disprove the hypothetical possibility of a false positive. – David Robinson Sep 11 '14 at 4:14
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    @DavidRobinson Or you could simply link the option to rep, as I theorized might currently be the case. Or make it an actual warning, rather than an error that can't be bypassed. Still give the warning but let someone override it. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:16
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    I'm not trying to make it about a specific instance. I write software for a living. I write bugs, as we all do. But you can't come to me and say, "Your software might have bugs, because it doesn't allow me to override its correct evaluation of my input." A bug report needs to report a bug. – Matthew Lundberg Sep 11 '14 at 4:17
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    @MatthewLundberg Okay, that's a fair point. Except that the software we're talking about is making guesses about the intent of a human. Therefore it can't be certain that is correct, especially when that human directly tells it that it's wrong. "I think you intended this to be code. So make it code." "I did not intend for that to be code." "Nah nah nah, can't hear you." – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 4:19
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    @MatthewLundberg "Output from the program should be formatted as code so a monospace font is used." Oh HELL no. There is nothing more annoying than output that's got inappropriate syntax highlighting. And very few people know how to or would bother overriding it. What you end up with is a disgusting mess of randomly colored text. Hell. No. – Will Sep 11 '14 at 12:54
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Because I Don't Have Enough Rep

It turns out that this warning is not displayed to users after a certain rep threshold.

Will was kind enough to edit my post for me and remove the code formatting. He says he wasn't even warned.

This is pretty much what I was hoping for, except it would be much less frustrating for the low rep user if there was a message to the effect that higher rep users can avoid these warnings or fix your post for you.

Workaround

You can have someone with high rep edit the post for you. Unfortunately, I needed to go in and make another edit to my question, but I was unable to submit it with the new formatting Will submitted, because I still get the warning.

However, Will pointed out that you can disable syntax highlighting, which significantly reduces the issue.

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In this case, the system correctly identified the text that you tried to block quote as output from your computer.

Text that goes into a computer, as well as text that comes out of your computer, should be formatted as code, with a fixed-width font.

That's how it appears on your screen, and how it should appear in your post. It's what we're all used to viewing when we see computer output or compiler errors or warnings.

  • That's how it appears on your screen What if he'd written this as a Winforms app rather than a console app? Same program, same text, but it no longer appears monospaced. – Rawling Sep 11 '14 at 9:49
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    Output in a console window doesn't have syntax highlighting for whatever language the application was written in. This answer is plain wrong. – Will Sep 11 '14 at 12:56
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    I don't understand how an answer that doesn't even address the question can have even this many upvotes. – DCShannon Sep 11 '14 at 16:57
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    -1 If it's not code, it shouldn't be formatted as code. If a fixed-width font should be used (it depends on the type of program), and it's not code, there's <pre>. There is no excuse for enabling syntax highlighting for anything other than actual code. – user743382 Sep 12 '14 at 11:01

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