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Looking at my own year reputation on Stack Overflow on this page, I stumbled on the following:

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We can see that rank #35854 has 372 total reputation vs. 418 year reputation, similarly rank #35855 has 391 total reputation vs. 418 year reputation. How is this even possible? Is there some kind of rule that I missed, misunderstood or misinterpreted? Could you clarify whether I'm making incorrect assumptions or this is a bug?

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  • @RetoKoradi thanks, this totally answers the question. I wasn't thorough enough in my own research for an answer. What should I do with the question then, I'm not sure it brings anything to the community? – Lolo Sep 1 '14 at 4:39
  • I'm not totally sure how we handle questions that were answered on MSE. I don't think they can be marked duplicates because it's a different site. Not a bad question, BTW, I was puzzled the first time I noticed it, and it took me a while to come across the explanation. – Reto Koradi Sep 1 '14 at 4:42
  • @RetoKoradi you may post the same answer on MSO as well and give link/reference to MSE post. – Aziz Shaikh Sep 1 '14 at 5:23
  • @AzizShaikh: There is a similar question on MSO (meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/258073/…). This is where I found the MSE link. It doesn't have an answer, though. I'll put an answer here. We can still close it as dup if somebody feels strongly about it. – Reto Koradi Sep 1 '14 at 5:29
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The numbers in your screenshot are from the reputation league. They include most, but not all reputation events. For example, the league scores do not include the -1 rep changes you get for downvoting answers.

Quote from original source on MSE (answer to Why is my total reputation less than my monthly reputation? by @Emmett):

Month reputation is the amount by which your reputation changed that month, excluding "private" reputation events. Certain reputation events are excluded from your public user profile, such as deleted posts or downvotes, so those are excluded from the leagues as well.

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