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After asking my this question, I receive an answer (call it A). But answer A and an answer (call it B) in a similar question contradict each other. So, I invite the poster of answer B to have a look at my question.

Now, I want to know whether it is suitable to do so, in comments?

So, do you mean I should delete the comment? Maybe I shouldn't ask it before I ask you.

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  • 1
    One question is about Windows, the other about *Nix. – Matthew Lundberg Aug 23 '14 at 2:40
  • @MatthewLundberg Yes. But answer B also mention the control-d which is the difference. – Tony Aug 23 '14 at 2:49
  • This would probably be a good use for a PM. I don't think this site has those though. – CornSmith Aug 23 '14 at 3:08
  • @Corn Exactly... – Cody Gray Aug 23 '14 at 6:48
12

No!

Generally speaking, this is not acceptable. Each question is fully independent of other questions. Just because I answer one of your questions, or a related question from someone else, does not mean that I want to or am able to answer additional questions you might have.

As people have pointed out in the comments, there are often important differences between the questions being asked, differences that you might not realize and that might keep me from being able to answer the other one. Moreover, this is not a personal support site. You're not paying us to answer your questions. Besides, the whole basis online Q&A is that while no one is an expert in all things, we are all experts in something.

If you ask the question in the appropriate way*, people who are willing and able to answer it will see it. You don't need to solicit attention by nagging people. The attention you receive this way is more than likely to be negative.

The only possible exception to this rule is if you ask what is truly a follow-up question. Say you've asked one question, received a good answer, but it prompted you to ask an additional question. You might let the person who posted the answer to the first question know in a polite comment that you've found their answer helpful and posted a follow-up question. Provide them with a link, but don't expect or demand an answer. They might answer if they want to, or they might just leave you with a thought or two in a comment, or they might just throw an upvote in your direction. They also might completely ignore you; that's fine, too.

Done tastefully and on rare occasion, this can be perfectly acceptable. But to be honest, I see it abused far too often. It is a major contributor to my tendency to ignore the comment notifications.


* By giving your question a clear, informative title; describing your problem as thoroughly as possible; providing a small, self-contained example that reproduces the problem; and tagging appropriately.

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    So what should I do now? Can deleting my comment retract the inbox message? – Tony Aug 23 '14 at 7:05
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    I don't think it does, you just get a dead link in your inbox. Not that big of a deal. Chalk it up to a learning experience. Now you know. Kudos for asking. – Cody Gray Aug 23 '14 at 7:11
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    Thank you. I know now. – Tony Aug 23 '14 at 7:17
  • When prompting to ask another question when reading an answer of a first question, does it require to be me to ask the first one? Can the invitation to another question be viewed as a follow-up one? Even when the answerer does not want to answer the follow-up question, the link by itself does enrich the understanding of the topic, hence shouldn't it be encouraged? – Ooker Nov 13 '17 at 19:14
  • @Ooker I think the TL;DR here is simply "don't do that". If you have waited a long time, post a bounty to get more attention to your question. If that doesn't work either, then maybe post a follow-up comment on a closely related question. – tripleee Jul 6 '18 at 18:46

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