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This question already has an answer here:

If the proper answer to a question is: "No, what you are asking to do cannot be done" is that a valid way to answer it?

Here is the question I am wondering about: How do I make git automatically open the mergetool if there is a merge conflict?

I offered the correct answer (No, you can't do it yet) and then offered an alternative workaround that accomplished what they were looking for. How could I have answered the question better? Should I have offered the answer (no) and the workaround as two separate answers?

marked as duplicate by Deduplicator, Servy, Martijn Pieters, Josh Caswell, user000001 Aug 20 '14 at 18:55

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    Yes, and this question is duplicate. Looking for the target... – Deduplicator Aug 20 '14 at 18:12
  • Yes, I believe my question could be a duplicate. Is there any special case for workarounds here? – onionjake Aug 20 '14 at 18:21
  • @onionjake You are of course welcome to include them. You are not obligated to provide a workaround. – Servy Aug 20 '14 at 18:22
  • @Servy if my workaround was unacceptable, would that make my answer invalid? – onionjake Aug 20 '14 at 18:26
  • @onionjake That would be a judgement that each reader would need to make when evaluating the question. There is no concrete answer in the general case. – Servy Aug 20 '14 at 18:29
  • @derp And a bad/unsafe/hacky workaround could well make an answer unhelpful in the general case, not just one person's case. – Servy Aug 20 '14 at 18:31
  • @Servy: Which is why such an answer should prominently and clearly state the caveats, in which case it stays a good answer (unless there's a way to avoid those pitfalls). – Deduplicator Aug 20 '14 at 18:38
  • Would it be more appropriate to offer the answer "No, it is not possible" and the answer with the workaround separately? – onionjake Aug 20 '14 at 18:38
  • @Deduplicator As I said, it's going to be entirely dependent on context. Trying to give rules for the general case just isn't productive. – Servy Aug 20 '14 at 18:41
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    I don't think so. The "no, not possible" (with proof) part would stand alone as a (not very good) answer, but the workaround needs some motivation, namely that what was asked is impossible and why. – Deduplicator Aug 20 '14 at 18:41

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