52

So I was reviewing post and came across a questionable answer (that turned about to be a test). Here is the question. And an answer was this:

This is another possibility for English:

While at the start I thought about down-voting or flagging, but I looked at the link and it did provide an answer and good information. Hence is helpful, even though the information was not recited in the answer. So I thought well it does answer the question, and is helpful. And choose "No action needed".

The site told me that I failed a test, and that I have had too many failed test that I can no longer review for 2 days. But this was the only test that I have failed in a long time, and was the only link given to me to show all my failed reviews.

Is this behavior expected of the system? I would think that only failing a single test (and while doing the correct thing on all others) that it would be a bit harsh to ban a user for 2 days.

Update

  • Total Reviews: 94
  • Failed Reviews: 2
    • The one in this question (Aug 8)
    • (Jun 18)
  • 2
    I think in order to answer this, we need to clarify "...in a long time". – gunr2171 Aug 8 '14 at 16:17
  • 1
    Alright, it's a bit tedious to look though my reviews. Give me a few minutes. – Spencer Wieczorek Aug 8 '14 at 16:21
  • 8
    It was a link only answer, so you should have rejected it. But I sort of understand where you're coming from, because that's what the question asked for. The only good action on this one was to close the question, IMHO. Thanks to the meta effect, I just gave it the last missing close vote... – Reto Koradi Aug 8 '14 at 16:31
  • 2
    That's a link-only answer, and should be either downvoted, edited with context from the link or custom flagged as "link-only answer". Choosing to do even less than this fails the audit. – gparyani Aug 8 '14 at 16:34
  • 33
    Unfortunately, there are many here who get so caught up in their vision of how the site should look that they forget that the site exists to help real people with real problems. Link only answer aren't preferred, but sometimes they do that, and when they provide useful information deleting them or hiding them from the public is simply the foolish habit of someone who needs to get off of SO for a while and do some actual programming to regain a healthy perspective. – Chris Stratton Aug 8 '14 at 16:53
  • 2
    @ChrisStratton These type of answers can be easily placed as a comment though. As it just adds some reference to the question and isn't a complete answer. – Sifu Aug 8 '14 at 16:55
  • 3
    @ChrisStratton: While what you say is true, the question is a bit of a soup sandwich, and is glaringly off-topic. Questions like this tend to attract shoddy answers anyway. – Robert Harvey Aug 8 '14 at 16:56
  • 12
    Not everyone has the reputation to post comments, and reviewers don't have the power to convert answers to comments. Also, the same problematic lot of empowered individuals also have the habit of sometimes bulk-erasing comments, under the flawed theory that they are unimportant relative to answers. – Chris Stratton Aug 8 '14 at 16:56
  • 1
    @ChrisStratton When you see a link-only answer, I suggest you edit it with context. Only when it's uneditable (e.g. a video link), then you flag it so that a mod can convert to a comment or delete. – gparyani Aug 8 '14 at 16:58
  • 3
    @ChrisStratton: You seem to have an axe to grind. In a (probably fruitless) effort to keep this conversation reasonably constructive, may I humbly suggest that people might have their comments wiped out less often if they confined their use to on-topic discussion of the question/answer's subject matter? – Robert Harvey Aug 8 '14 at 16:58
  • 1
    @ChrisStratton Mods can convert ANY answer to a comment even if the comment was posted by a <50 rep user. – gparyani Aug 8 '14 at 16:59
  • 7
    Reviewers of the sort asking the question do not have that power to convert an answer to a comment. – Chris Stratton Aug 8 '14 at 17:00
  • 2
    How can I see my total reviews and failed reviews as you've shown in Update ? – Shree Krishna Mar 29 '16 at 11:43
  • 2
    Is this ban loop updated ? Because I got banned for 8 days not 7 even after passing 3-4 audits and just failing one review. This is sad. They should include the ratio to number of audits passed vs number of audits failed. – Harshit Agrawal Dec 10 '17 at 8:23
  • 1
    The current audit system really sucks. >8-days bans may occur after failing a single audit, after correctly answering lots of audits. This really infuriates anyone willing to contribute. Staying away for so long is also bad for a reviewer, because when he/she gets back, he/she already forgot "the lesson" which the system was trying to teach him/her. I would prefer a system which actually leads you to a longer 10-20 questions test, which could reduce your vacation time to half its time if successfully answered. – sɐunıɔןɐqɐp Oct 26 '18 at 7:21
17

You picked "No Action Needed" on a link-only answer. Answers that barely consist of a no-context link to somewhere else are considered "link-only" and are candidates for deletion if they are not edited.

The best action you could have taken was to click the "Edit" button and try to edit some context into the post itself, but keep the link in there for reference.

The second-least thing you could have done was to try to flag the post, such as with a custom flag saying "link-only answer". This would inform a moderator to delete it specifically for being link-only.

Finally, the least thing you could have done is to downvote the post for being low-quality or link-only.

Choosing to do even less than this fails the audit.

And, oh, don't be fooled that the main purpose of the audits is to punish users who don't know how to review posts. Rather, it is to hunt and fish for robo-reviewers, who simply click the same button without even looking at the posts themselves. Based on your review actions that a mod told me about in another (deleted, 10k-only) answer, the system likely thought you are one of them and thus temporarily banned you from reviewing. It's impossible to get more specific, though.

  • 15
    The "Best action" you proposed would get rejected in the edit review list, as it changes the answer completely. This is the poster's duty to change his post. – Sifu Aug 8 '14 at 16:53
  • 2
    @Sifu No; I've done this at times on real reviews and had my edits approved. Besides, AFAIK, on audits, clicking the "edit" button always passes the audit whether or not it is known-good or known-bad (but this prevents from catching robo-reviewers). – gparyani Aug 8 '14 at 16:54
  • 3
    Note that most the information the mod provided was false or assumed falsely. I understand that I should of edited, or down-voted. I'm wondering why I was banned only after a single fail though. – Spencer Wieczorek Aug 8 '14 at 16:55
  • 1
    @SpencerWieczorek I've answered your question with the last paragraph. Likely, the system checks your review history whenever you fail an audit, and tries to determine whether you are a robo-reviewer before it decides to ban you. In this case, the system likely thought so and thus issued a ban. – gparyani Aug 8 '14 at 16:57
  • 2
    @SpencerWieczorek: You weren't banned by a moderator. The edit bans are automated. – Robert Harvey Aug 8 '14 at 17:00
  • 5
    @RobertHarvey Never said I was, I know the bans are automated. In my question: "Is this behavior expected of the system?". – Spencer Wieczorek Aug 8 '14 at 17:01
  • I don't think it's only made to catch robots : I don't see the interest of a robot to review posts. but it sure sometimes REMIND me of what is acceptable on SO and why. – Antoine Pelletier Feb 21 '17 at 22:19
  • @AntoinePelletier For people to get badges... – user202729 Apr 8 '18 at 4:26
8

You only failed one audit, but there are probably other reviews that you made that were incorrect and that weren't audits. According to this answer, when you fail an audit, the system also looks to see if you've done any other wrong reviews that weren't audits:

When you fail an audit, the review system looks at your past review history, and takes into account not just how many audits you've failed, but also a few other heuristics intended to help identify folks who've gotten careless or just aren't paying attention at all. If the results are sufficiently damning, you get a short break. If you come back and do the same thing, you get a longer break.

So you probably reviewed something as No action needed that later got deleted as spam, recommended deletion on a post that later got a lot of upvotes, or something like that.

The same thing happened to me recently, I got banned after failing an audit for the first time in several weeks, while I have passed tons of audits. The problem was that I reviewed another crap answer (screenshot for <10k users) as No action needed that later got deleted as very low quality. You probably did something similar.

  • I fear that will be declined. The vacation system exists to protect the content, not to instruct people how to do the right thing. Showing the list of reviews that are involved may give too much insight into the actual selection process, which in turn opens up possibilities to game it. But hey - you won't know for sure until you've made the feature request. – Gimby Feb 22 '17 at 8:50
  • 3
    @Gimby "The vacation system exists to protect the content, not to instruct people how to do the right thing." I'm not sure about that. In the linked answer, Shog9 says "These [suspensions] are meant to be educational tools to help you become a better reviewer, not punish you for bad behavior." – Donald Duck Feb 22 '17 at 10:18

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