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I stumble upon more and more useful but closed questions with many upvotes, where the answers have even more upvotes. The questions were usually closed for "not constructive" and "opinion based" reasons.

Recently I lost about 100 points myself, when an "opinion based" question was permanently deleted. My answer had had the most upvotes, obviously. It did trigger a debate, but these debates are usually full of extremely useful insights. Losing 100 points is not fun. I've stopped answering questions altogether since then.

Other cases include the questions of non-programmers who must program. Typical example: biologists who use Perl for genetic research. Their questions are slightly bad, true, but with an extra 30s reading, they can be easily understood. In a matter of seconds the votes to close the question pile up. Why?

I feel that many moderators behave like trolls, guarding the orthodoxy of SO, instead of trying to help.

But people cannot be changed. Therefore I feel the only solution is to abolish the right to close questions altogether. What do you think?

  • Are you suggesting that we get rid of the ability to close questions altogether, or only take away that ability from just the moderators? – user456814 Aug 2 '14 at 6:44
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    You might get more opinions if you post specific examples. – Gabe Sechan Aug 2 '14 at 6:46
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    If you're talking about this question, it was neither closed nor deleted by a moderator and it lost you only 43 reputation. – animuson Aug 2 '14 at 6:47
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    Examples, or it never happened. – user456814 Aug 2 '14 at 6:53
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    I feel that many moderators behave like trolls Does that seem like constructive dialogue to you? – Michael Petrotta Aug 2 '14 at 6:59
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    @Michael to be fair, it does require fire and acid to kill us. – Andrew Barber Aug 2 '14 at 7:00
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    why oh Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late? – gnat Aug 2 '14 at 7:03
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    Closely related: Why are the best questions the ones which have been closed? on Meta.SE – Josh Caswell Aug 2 '14 at 8:52
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    @animuson in all fairness, those points should have gone to the search engine from which they were taken. – Will Aug 3 '14 at 20:29
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    I just wanted to also point out that Stack Overflow is flooded with 7000-8000 new questions per day. People will take shortcuts in order to process that many questions. If a user's question is not perfect (or at least near perfect), then it should be no surprise that the question receives a negative response, because a lot of users just won't have time nor energy to give tender-loving care to mediocre and "slightly" bad questions. – user456814 Aug 4 '14 at 16:55
  • We want to highlight the good, clear, well-written questions that deserve to be answered, and that requires quickly filtering out the many, many questions that just don't make the cut. As I've already stated elsewhere, if you really think a question is not that bad, then edit it to fix it up, and vote to reopen, and possibly bring the specific question up on Meta. – user456814 Aug 4 '14 at 16:56
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    Moderators are here to help, not to troll people. I lost over 10% of my total reputation when a bunch of old questions were purged, so I feel the sting too. Purging those questions made the site better, though. We don't need hundreds and thousands of fake internet points for linking to tutorials. People can ask Google, their professor, or in chat if that's all they need. – Bill the Lizard Aug 5 '14 at 13:03
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Let me pick apart your question in (almost) reverse order.

Therefore I feel the only solution is to abolish the right to close questions altogether. What do you think?

What do I think? I think that you haven't put a lot of thought into your question.

A question that is closed is still there for everyone to see, you simply can't add new answers to it. Additionally it is possible for the community to reopen it. You can read all about it here - you will find that there has been a lot of thought and work gone into designing this system

I feel that many moderators behave like trolls, guarding the orthodoxy of SO, instead of trying to help.

You need to differentiate between moderators and users with higher reputation and access to moderation style tools. Moderators are the exception handlers of the site, the higher rep users are the ones who do the vast majority of the janitorial tasks on the site. Except in certain specific cases these users cannot act unilaterally, it takes a group of them to agree to achieve a result.

The questions were usually closed for "not constructive" and "opinion based" reasons.

That is because they are.... not constructive or are primarily opinion based. It is one of the primary tenets of the site that these questions are avoided as they frequently don't generate useful answers and they are not suitable for a Q&A site (they are better suited to discussion style forums, of which Stack Overflow is not).

Losing 100 points is not fun. I've stopped answering questions altogether since then.

You are competing for magical points that have no real value. Your solution to losing a few is to stop answering altogether, thus not collecting any new magical points? If the points mean something to you then that is not a particularly logical approach to take.

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Closed questions

If you feel that a question should not be closed, you personally have enough reputation to vote to reopen them. You can even choose to start a Meta discussion to explain why you think the question should be reopened.

Another option besides beginning a Meta discussion is to speak with some users in a chat room about the question. Be warned, however, that not all chat rooms are receptive to discussing requests to reopen closed questions, and you might receive a hostile response from some of them.

If you really want to try to bring the issue up in a chat room, then I recommend the Tavern on the Meta to you. The regulars there are generally open-minded and friendly (or at worst neutral), and the room is also frequented by moderators, so the atmosphere is generally much friendlier than what you may find in other chat rooms.

Deleted questions

You can also start a discussion about whether or not a question should be undeleted.

Non-programmers

Other cases include the questions of non-programmers who must program. Typical example: biologists who use Perl for genetic research. Their questions are slightly bad, true, but with an extra 30s reading, they can be easily understood. In a matter of seconds the votes to close the question pile up. Why?

If you really understand other users' "bad" questions, then edit them to improve them, and then they might not become closed.

Closing questions

The community has to close off-topic questions. Otherwise this site will die. We have to take out the trash, prune the useless (or just harmful) dead weight, so that what remains may thrive and grow.

Moderators are actually more cautious than normal users about closing questions, since they have a binding, unilateral close vote. They'll often refrain from closing questions because of the appearance of unjustly and unfairly using their moderator privileges. There's actually a Meta post or two about it somewhere (or MSE), if anyone else wants to go dig those up.

So No, we don't need to be taking close privileges away from anybody.

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    I also think it's noteworthy that even if we do accept the premise that moderators recklessly close questions, and I can't say I personally do, but even if we do, they still serve more good than bad on the site. I've seen a whole lot of really bad questions that serve no place here posted, and if we just accepted those, the whole site would have fallen apart a long time ago. – Matthew Haugen Aug 2 '14 at 6:50
  • Upon reading my question carefully, you might have noticed that it's about closed questions with MANY UPVOTES, and slightly bad questions, where all you need is a few seconds of extra reading. So no, it's not about the real crappy stuff. – SzG Aug 2 '14 at 7:11
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    @SzG I read your question just fine. Just because a question is popular and has a lot of upvotes, that does not also necessarily mean that it is also a good question for this site and it's strict no-discussion Q&A model. Again, if you think a question should be reopened, then vote to reopen it, and/or start a discussion about it on Meta. – user456814 Aug 2 '14 at 7:14

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