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This question already has an answer here:

I started to ask a question and found this warning:

enter image description here

Can someone please tell me why it's there? Why, exactly, am I in danger of being blocked, for goodness sake? I always do research before asking a question, I'm polite, I do my best to phrase my questions clearly, I always supply additional information when asked, I continue my research and update my questions as appropriate, and I'm always very appreciative of the help I get. Yet I'm in danger of being blocked because some of my past questions have not been well received?

I just reviewed my history and count 59 questions asked with a total of 5 down votes and one (1) deleted question (that I can see). Can someone please tell me exactly which of the questions I asked were "not well received" and what that means exactly? By whom it was so received? Was there some kind of committee who voted on the degree of enthusiasm with which it/they was/were received, or did someone simply get up on the wrong side of the bed and pass a sour note to the Receiving Department?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Unheilig, HaveNoDisplayName, user6263819, Glorfindel Jun 29 '16 at 5:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Maybe you have some deleted questions? – John Palmer Jul 24 '14 at 6:32
  • May be, as I noted, I can see one. Why does one get a black mark for deleting a question? – rattletrap99 Jul 24 '14 at 6:38
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    Deleting a question by itself isn't a "black mark", but if there are downvotes on the question they are counted. Incidentally, the warnings are automatic and determined by an algorithm, there is no committee or individual responsible. – David Robinson Jul 24 '14 at 6:42
  • Also, I count at least 5 downvotes on your visible questions. – David Robinson Jul 24 '14 at 6:44
  • Zero score questions also count against you. – user000001 Jul 24 '14 at 6:46
  • I see I've picked up 4 more down votes since I posted this query, as expected. I suspect some were included in David's count. But I guess this isn't considered piling on? – rattletrap99 Jul 24 '14 at 7:08
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    @rattletrap99: No, you had received 5 downvotes on or before June 26, I was not counting any from today in my comment. (See your rep history). And you received 2 downvotes today, not 4. – David Robinson Jul 24 '14 at 7:19
  • Sorry, I mistook the 4 reputation points I lost in the last 45 minutes as down votes. I'm sure there's no connection to my having questioned the system, though. BTW, nobody has yet offered an answer to my question above as to which questions weren't well received, nor why. Just more downvotes. – rattletrap99 Jul 24 '14 at 7:32
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    @rattletrap99: I already told you: the warnings are automatic and determined by an algorithm, there is no committee or individual responsible. That is, the not-well-received questions are the ones you were downvoted on. – David Robinson Jul 24 '14 at 11:55
  • Not that many deleted questions, but there are a lot of zero-score questions. Perhaps zero-score questions should simply carry less weight here since the problem is that questions generally receive fewer upvotes than answers for the same number of views. – BoltClock Jul 24 '14 at 11:57
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    @rattletrap99 if you want to understand why deletions are bad, please read my answer to Why are deleted questions always considered as a bad thing? – psubsee2003 Jul 24 '14 at 11:58
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You're in a weird state: You have a lot of questions, but not a lot of votes, and that means that you're more likely to trend 'negatively' than positively. Here are some stats:

  • You have 65 questions.
  • 5 are deleted, and negative or zero-scored (Negative: 1, 2, Zero: 3, 4, 5)
  • You have 7 closed questions: ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) (some of those are deleted; so this won't add up to your total.

  • Only 12 are positively scored. Total: (15 points)

  • 5 are negatively scored. Total: (-12 points)

Now that I've gotten the stats out of the way, here are some general thoughts after looking through your questions:

Your titles aren't very descriptive. Adjectives like "Nightmare", "Problem" or "Mystery" (Used 3 times), or Quandary (used twice), Issue aren't things that a user would search for on Google.

Your titles should reflect what you'd search for on Google. If you don't know enough about your problem to know what to search for, you're already entering territory where you probably don't know enough to write a well-received question.

  1. The questions don't always give the information needed to solve them.

  2. No one cares about your politeness. If you want to 'assimilate' into the culture and have your questions better received, learn the culture's norms. Here, we dislike salutations and gratitude in questions or answers. They're superfluous. We know you're grateful because we'd be grateful if someone solved our problem. Show it with votes, not words.

  3. Questions should be concise; well-written; convey the information needed to solve the issue; and not ask open-ended things.

Lest you think I'm beating you up -- I'm not. You have asked some very nice questions, but for the most part, it seems like Stack Overflow is the first place you go before research, before sitting down and doing some critical thinking, and before trying to reproduce the issue outside of your environment.

You're already doing better than a lot of people who get your warning: You've gotten to 65 questions before it happening. That's a good thing. We see a lot that happen after just two or three questions.

To summarize:

  • Stick to the facts.
  • Don't use colorful adjectives
  • Make your titles what you'd search in Google for
  • Keep the questions concise
  • Make the actual question you're asking something not open ended. "How to I frob the widget" as opposed to "What am I doing wrong?"
  • Remember: We don't care about politeness -- and you will even seem like 'in the crowd' if you don't use them.
  • Comment regularly on answers and on your questions right after you post them -- those magical 5 minutes are the time when the most people will see your question
  • Don't get discouraged
  • Try to improve your older questions and your deleted questions.
  • Thanks very much for your reasoned and detailed response. I'm hoping an expression of gratitude won't net me a bunch of down votes on Meta. I believe I adhere closely to your bulleted suggestions with no more than the usual trip-ups that can be expected of an inexperienced enthusiast. And I believe I can be forgiven my trespasses with regard to "politeness" and "colorful adjectives." I reference the stated SO model of behavior at: stackoverflow.com/help/behavior , top 2 paragraphs. Maybe this model should be revised to more accurately reflect the reality of SO's culture. – rattletrap99 Jul 24 '14 at 15:30
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    @rattletrap99 There really isn't a 'culture' at Stack Overflow inasfar as there are many small cultures that somehow work together -- the C++ crowd is vastly different from the JQuery crowd, who have different conventions than the Regex crowd and who are wholly different than the C# crowd. Your best bet is to improve your existing questions (deleted and non deleted), correct what caused your questions to be closed; and try to answer questions well. – George Stocker Jul 24 '14 at 15:32

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