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The problem with aggressively closing duplicates (within minutes or hours) is that it diminishes the incentive for fresh and likely better answers.

A good way to address this is to show answers to the original question as answers to the fresh question, while allowing the asker of the fresh question to choose a different answer as the correct one. (This can be enriched in various ways: links to/from duplicates, factor in votes and age, etc. but those are secondary aspects.)

This incentivizes fresh answers because a better answer has a greater chance of being accepted as correct given that there is an active asker eager for answers. The asker is free to accept the originally accepted answer early on to let answerers know that they are not still looking for a different or better answer.

Additionally new questions, and those with recent activity have more eyeballs looking at them and good answers have a better chance of getting upvotes. Necromancing is thankless.

Lastly, this question wouldn't be complete if it didn't pose the meta-question, is this itself a duplicate?

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    ... because the internet will be made a better place by having the twenty-twelve good answer to a question spread out randomly across the elleventy-teen instances of the question so that no one can find them all and the voting is maximally non-uniform amongst them. Or not. – dmckee Jun 7 '14 at 0:48
  • Would be nice for stats on "new users/askers now who accept the first answer that looks right", compared to "older questions where they accepted the answer that best answered the question" – random Jun 7 '14 at 3:14
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    meta: why are meta folks collectively so sure of themselves and so quick to dismiss a concern (and heap on the snark @dmckee )? yes, several of my assumptions were wrong as discussed in CodyGray's answer, but significant issues remain. see my comments on CodyGray's answer below. – necromancer Jun 8 '14 at 0:26
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The problem with aggressively closing duplicates (within minutes or hours) is that it diminishes the incentive for fresh and likely better answers.

No, it doesn't. It just ensures that those answers are placed in a more appropriate place, together with the other answers, where they can be seen and evaluated: on the master question.

However, it does diminish the incentive for a bunch of duplicate answers rehashing things that have already been said better by the other answers. This is the goal.

This incentivizes fresh answers because a better answer has a greater chance of being accepted as correct given that there is an active asker eager for answers.

Acceptance of an answer is worth only 15 reputation. Upvotes are worth 10, but you can get an unlimited number of them. Upvotes continue to trickle in on many of my old answers, far outshadowing whatever reputation I earned from the asker accepting them. So although the checkmark is certainly an incentive to post an answer, there is no disincentive to answer the other question.

Additionally new questions, and those with recent activity have more eyeballs looking at them and good answers have a better chance of getting upvotes. Necromancing is thankless.

This is false. Well, part of it is true. The part that says "questions...with recent activity have more eyeballs looking at them". That part is true, and posting an answer to a question counts as recent activity. It bumps up the question in the "active" list and gets eyeballs on it. Those eyeballs are frequently connected to hands that can click the vote buttons. This is, of course, all by design.

Besides, all traffic that the duplicate question gets is being redirected to the master question. Those viewers will see your answer there. There is no net loss.

The other part of your claim that's true is that "good answers have a better chance of getting upvotes". Obviously; that too is by design. If you post a good answer, it is likely to be upvoted. But it doesn't matter which question you post that good answer to. So post it to the master question, where people can find it, not one of the many duplicates. There's no point in having good answers scattered all over the place.

"Necromancing" is far from thankless. Well, it is, but only actual necromancing. Answering questions more than 60 days old can be rather rewarding. We actually award a Necromancer badge to reward people who answer "old" questions.

The truth is, I hate that people call this "necromancy". Necromancy is the use of magic to communicate with dead people. When you answer a question, you aren't using any magic, you're just using your brain. And there's no such thing as a "dead" question. Questions and answers aren't like people or foodstuffs; they don't age or go bad as time passes. Frankly, I don't understand how this philosophy of ignoring and neglecting "old" questions developed. I understand it comes from the traditional online forums, a model that we have explicitly abandoned. But even there, I don't understand how it ever made any sense. Why does everything need to be revisited and duplicated periodically? It certainly doesn't make the Internet a better place.

If you have something to contribute, contribute it.

  • good answer, but two issues: – necromancer Jun 8 '14 at 0:17
  • #1. it is not clear how could an asker make an old question active again to attract attention? it seems the only way to do it is to ask a duplicate question and then get it closed and linked to the original question. may be the feature really needed is to allow people to "freshen" an old question. – necromancer Jun 8 '14 at 0:18
  • #2. answer acceptance locks it in the top position and upvotes snowball for popular questions, so the problem of incentivizing better answers remains real. why grant the first person to ask a question a monopoly on choosing which answer to place on top, simply because they were first? – necromancer Jun 8 '14 at 0:21
  • less relevantly, i esp. appreciate the lack of snark in this answer. and yeah, tell me about misuse of necromancing! such a shame that the work of legitimate, honest, hardworking necromancers is diluted by the frivolously named SO badge. – necromancer Jun 8 '14 at 0:23
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    @necro (1) By editing it, adding new information or simply revising. But I didn't think we were talking about askers, I thought we were talking about answerers. Either way, though, same answer. Except answers can also post an answer. (2) Because that's how the site works. Acceptance shows that the person who asked the question found your answer most helpful. Arguably it doesn't work well with canonical questions, where lots of other questions are closed as duplicates of that one. But it's the system we have. I'm sure it's been discussed before, just too lazy to search for it. – Cody Gray Jun 9 '14 at 1:01
  • I would say that upvotes more than make up for it. They are how the community selects the best answer. If you sort answers by votes (the default), then the top voted answer is always #2 behind the accepted answer. So it's not like a whole lot of scrolling is required. Most people have sufficient attention span to read 2 answers. Especially if #1 didn't solve their problem and yours might. – Cody Gray Jun 9 '14 at 1:02
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    Re: "answers [...] don't age or go bad as time passes" That's actually very much not true. Answers do "go bad" as the technology changes, which of course happens constantly. – John Dibling Sep 27 '14 at 14:48
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A question that's been asked a dozen times has already had a dozen opportunities to receive an answer. In fact, in many cases it still has -- frankly, it seems like there are a few too many questions that literally have a dozen open duplicates. Whether it's because someone didn't bother to search first, or they don't like the answers given and were hoping to be told something different, or whatever. (Preferably they'd be closed as well, but it's harder than you'd think to monitor 7 million questions and keep track of which ones have already been asked before.)

A 13th duplicate is by definition not significantly different than the existing 12, and does not really make it any easier for future visitors to find an answer on SO; it just adds to the pile of crap they have to wade through. The only advantage it'd have is that it'll be on the front page for a while...but then, so were all the others at some point. Worked out so well for them, right? :P

If you want fresh eyes on an existing question, then offer a bounty (which puts it on the "featured" tab). Or ask about it in one of the relevant chat rooms. You can also ask about it somewhere famous (like Reddit, for example). I've seen that work on several occasions. (There's even badges for doing it.) In any case, if the question is any good, bringing attention to the original (rather than to yet another duplicate) is better in the long run.

If you think the existing answers suck, then provide a better one. The posting of an answer will mark the question as recently active, so it gets another chance at the front page, and will get you some rep if it's indeed better. :)

If you just want to control what answer gets the green check mark, that's not a good reason to clutter up the place with duplicates.

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