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I asked this question a few days ago and never got a satisfactory answer that suited my needs. I now have new information, that might make it easier to answer the question.

How do I go about this? Should I edit the question and try to attract more traffic to it, or should I ask a new question and phrase it differently, so it's not an exact duplicate? (and possibly accept the answer I got on the original question, which was not a bad answer persé and did point me in the right direction?)

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In most cases editing the question is exactly what you should do.

It will bump the question to the home page (if perhaps only briefly) and you'll get a fresh set of eyes on it.

If, however, the additional information would substantially change the question and/or invalidate any existing answers then you should really ask a new question. In this case it should be sufficiently different to the original so it shouldn't run the risk of being closed as a duplicate.

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  • Should I edit out information that's no longer very relevant? (at the risk of some comments and the one answer seeming a bit out of place) Should I maybe imply that big changes have been made to the question? – overactor Jun 3 '14 at 16:15
  • @overactor - If possible you should leave the original content in the post - otherwise it would make the original answer appear wrong. – ChrisF Jun 3 '14 at 16:16
  • That will make the question ridiculously long though. If I edit the question, would it be okay to ask here for someone to take a look at it and tell me what needs to change about it? – overactor Jun 3 '14 at 16:20
  • @overactor - hmm, maybe leave a summary of the original content. Though the more you say the more it looks like you should be asking a new question. – ChrisF Jun 3 '14 at 16:22
  • I've made it a new question. Did I make the right decision and is it an okay question? – overactor Jun 3 '14 at 16:53

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