8

Okay: Parsing JSON Object in Java

In Java I want to parse the above jsonobject and store the values in an arraylist.

Can any one please provide me some code snippet through which i can achieve this.

Not okay: A better Java JSON library

Can anyone recommend a good Java JSON library (better than the one from http://json.org/)?

With 668 upvotes, this was "closed as not constructive" (in an earlier era) -- nowadays I suspect it would be closed for the "off-topic" reason.

(There is likely a better example -- the author doesn't even say what is wrong with json.org -- but closed or deleted posts are hard to find.)


Neither example I gave was stellar; let me ask two similar hypothetical questions:

  • "How do I parse JSON in Java?"

  • "What is a good Java library for parsing JSON?"

IMO, the answers to the two questions will be very similar: a library, an example, a brief explanation, and perhaps comparison to other approaches.

The first question will be okay; the second question will be closed as off-topic because it asks for a recommendation of a "tool, library, or off-site resource".


Java lacks built-in support for JSON, so any answer to "How can I parse JSON" will be a library recommendation.

Because of these qualms, I've skipped most "off-site recommendations" in the review queue.

Is there a significant and clear-cut distinction between these types of questions?


EDIT: I do know about softwarerec.se. (I visit it often.) I also know about programmers.stackexchange.com and cs.stackexchange.com, with which stackoverflow.com overlaps.

BTW, in my opinion experts in programming (including recommendations) are more common than experts in software recommendation (of all kinds).

  • I'd at least expect some attempt at code even if it's just pseudo coded to show some small attempt at research. Any title that asks for a tool / library recommendation is always going to be too open ended. – Lankymart May 26 '14 at 18:14
  • 1
    It isn't a good question, but I don't care much for the deletion here either; there are a lot of questions still linking to that one. It would be nice if we could salvage it somehow. – Shog9 May 26 '14 at 18:57
6

The question of "how do I parse JSON" presents a problem that can have a solution. The solution will draw upon the programming experience of the person answering the question.

The question of "what is a good library for parsing JSON" is one that has no right answer. Instead of drawing on programming experience, it is asking Stack Overflow to be a crowd sourced search engine and recommendation system. The Q&A format works very poorly for this (though there is that Software Recommendations.SE experiment).

Consider the question "how do I parse json in go?" (I looked at your tags and didn't see go listed) which is something that you wouldn't be able to answer. On the other hand, if the question was "what is a library for parsing json in go", you could do this google search and find a bunch of answers (that the OP apparently didn't search for), pick one, read its pros and cons and condense that into an answer - using more of your skill at searching than programming.

And thus, if the question is something that anyone with rudimentary google skills can find and give a recommendation for, it falls into that close reason.

  • I feel that the presumed poor quality of both question and answer makes for a bit of strawman here. Someone asking "what is a library for parsing json in go" would have a use case, requirements, etc. and they would want for more than a link. – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:21
  • 2
    @PaulDraper and when it has all those things, it becomes a question that properly meets the requirements for a question on Software Recs.SE. – user289086 May 26 '14 at 17:24
  • Yes, and I visit it often. I thought about mentioning that in my question, but thought it was too long. softwarerec.se is good, but what do you think a community would be more likely be an expert in (i.e. which is more cohesive): programming (including recommendations) or software recommendation (of all kinds)? IMO, the SO community is far better qualified to answer the example question than softwarerec. (Of course, that doesn't mean it isn't off-topic here...) – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:31
  • Lacking the from the start discipline on what constitutes a good question and good answer for software recommendations, Stack Overflow gets filled with crap questions and crap answers (which don't get cleaned up - the 20k to delete answer and the already problematic issue of question quality). As such, another site with a different social contract is necessary. Attracting experts to it is another matter. But key here is that SO doesn't have the discipline to ask, clean, or answer software rec questions in any way that resembles quality. – user289086 May 26 '14 at 17:36
  • MichaelT, very good points. I don't disagree; I've just found it hard in some cases to know whether a question asks for a library or asks a question than clearly needs one. – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:38
  • @PaulDraper if in doubt, close quickly and then clarify if the question is asking about a problem or looking for a tool. If its the problem, then edit the question in such a way that it discourages answers such as "You should use jaxb" and "You should use GSON". If the clarification is asking for a tool recommendation, then point them in the direction of software recs with the appropriate requirements, or edit the question so that it can be a question that gets migrated and not closed. The key is to close fast before answers that are inappropriate for the site make it more difficult to fix – user289086 May 26 '14 at 17:50
  • related: Let's rescue wayward resource requests! (trial run) – gnat Jun 28 '17 at 11:16
3

In answer to your hypothetical questions:

"How do I parse JSON in Java?"

The answer is

Use a library, here's how you do it with X, but you might want to look at Y or Z.

Note: This is not saying which library to use, just that you need one and gives other examples that might do the job. It's not a stellar question, but then it's only a hypothetical one. A better question would have explained what the OP wanted to do. It could be made into a more valuable answer by explaining how to evaluate libraries to make sure they do what you want them to do.

Now for your second question:

"What is a good Java library for parsing JSON?"

This is highly subjective. What I find good you might not. What I recommend today will be superseded (or might even disappear) tomorrow. It's also a bad question in that it doesn't explain what the OP wants to do.

  • "It's also a bad question in that it doesn't explain what the OP wants to do." So, if he asked "I want to do X and Y, and I would like to do Z if possible. What is the good library for that?" is that any different? – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:13
  • @PaulDraper - Yes, as the library could disappear tomorrow. However, we also now have a site for questions like that - Software Recommendations – ChrisF May 26 '14 at 17:13
  • Yes, and I visit it often. I thought about mentioning that in my question, but thought it was too long. softwarerec.se is good, but what do you think a community would be more likely be an expert in (i.e. which is more cohesive): programming (including recommendations) or software recommendation (of all kinds)? IMO, the SO community is far better qualified to answer the example question than softwarerec. (Of course, that doesn't mean it isn't off-topic here...) – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:17
  • "the library could disappear tomorrow". By that logic, no Javascript question should use jQuery, as it could disappear tomorrow :P – Paul Draper May 26 '14 at 17:23

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .