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Is it ethical (and also allowed) to link to another question to get attention of specific user who you know can help you?

I had question A, and XYZ gave me great help.

Now a while later I have question B, which is related to question A, and I know that XYZ will be able to give me help. No one has attempted to help me on Question B since it was asked.

What is an ethical way to contact XYZ and ask him if he would consider looking at this (he very likely did not see the question for example) - if he doesn't want to help then obviously no problems.

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    I always get grumpy with users that do this to me. No, it's not acceptable behaviour. – Martijn Pieters May 21 '14 at 14:10
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    There are a couple of folks who follow me on Twitter who send me tweets from time-to-time asking me to look at their posts on SO. You may want to look at this for some insight - meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/254814/… – Jay Blanchard May 21 '14 at 14:10
  • It is almost always preferable over a chameleon question, the kind where you continue to ask questions in comments. Almost never when you post it to as comment to an answer by XYZ that doesn't have anything to do with your new question. – Hans Passant May 21 '14 at 14:56
  • related, but please don't be a help-vampire – user2140173 May 21 '14 at 14:57
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    Once your main problem is solved and you're left with a side-effect that you can't solve, I don't see the harm in alerting the person that helped you previously to your new post. Don't go "help me asap with my new question" though; leave it as an open invitation: "Thanks for your help, I made a new post about <side-effect>". But this should only be done when it is a direct result from the previous answer, don't do it when they are not related and/or you didn't have previous contact with that user about the subject. – Jeroen Vannevel May 21 '14 at 15:55
  • I upvoted cuz feel the same as you Peter. Sites like Quora implement this kind of feature and people get along. – Victor Dec 24 '19 at 1:14
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No, it is not acceptable behavior to comment on posts asking someone to look at your question.

If you want to draw additional attention to your question, you can attach a bounty to it.

Of course, if you want to draw attention to your question through external sites, such as by tweeting your question, posting about it on Facebook, G+, etc., that is what the "share" feature is there for.

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    I agree, this is unacceptable. In fact, I regularly hand out warnings to users who spam comments demanding that high-rep users respond to their questions. It's one of the reasons I wish we had better comment moderation tools, because finding and deleting all these can be a pain. – Brad Larson May 21 '14 at 14:51
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    Highly related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/254814/… – BoltClock May 21 '14 at 14:55
  • may i inquire why is unacceptable? I downvoted because i see no argument that convince me of not having a feature like this. what about having some reputation or antiguity in the site for using such feature? what about limiting the times an user can perform such request per day/per week? What about having the user a preference that allow him to be reached or not by this feature...i mean, if you don't want to be requested for an anwser, you will be never be. More about my motivations are here meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/392401/… – Victor Dec 24 '19 at 1:10
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    @Victor I have already described the appropriate means of drawing additional attention to a post. If you wish to ethically draw additional attention to your post, those are the mechanisms available to you. People who've made the intentional decision to seek out certain types of posts can do just that. The fact that the only people actually interested in supporting this feature are the people that want to ask others to look at a question, and that pretty much everyone who would be asked to look at questions is against it is exactly why this feature doesn't exist. – Servy Dec 24 '19 at 14:46
  • @Servy i was redirected here for continuing the discussion originated by my original post. I have already edited my original proposal in order to continue to gather feedback, and it will be my pleasure to continue the discussion on my post (or other place). So far, i realize that some persons (that includes you) doesn't like the proposal, but nobody really gives me actual arguments why not. The fact you don't find useful, doesn't mean others will – Victor Dec 24 '19 at 15:03
  • @Victor When proposing a feature it's on you to describe why it's a good feature, not on everyone else to explain why it's a bad feature. Saying that you want to be able to bother lots of other people who don't wish to be bothered by you, and that we need to explain why we shouldn't have to be annoyed by you, isn't how this works. But again, I've given you numerous reasons. If you aren't interested in any of them, that's on you. – Servy Dec 27 '19 at 2:27
  • i'm interesting on having feedback about what do you think regarding the tool i'm proposing. In my original post about this subject, in the comments i wrote, i had the possibiliy to express further reasons and polish the specs (that, in turn, take me to do some editions over the post). Also, i said(in my last comment) that i get the idea that this feature will not have enought usage for justify a development. I do sustaint my thoughts about how we could relate in a CoP and I respect that we don't share some ideas. Thanks to anyone for their time for answering, that includes you @Servy. – Victor Dec 27 '19 at 17:49

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