39

I've noticed with the new gold-badge closing that the user no longer has a choice. Voting to close is fine, if you're wrong it doesn't close, no big deal. But if you gold-badge close and you're wrong, you look bad.

Maybe give a choice for vote (if you're unsure, but leaning it should be closed) to close or gold-close?

Of course, the easy (but not so good) solution would be to simply ignore and move on.

13

When you get a golden badge, you are trusted.

  • You are trusted that you know what you're doing.
  • You are trusted that you know what kinds of questions were already asked in your tag(s)
  • You are trusted not to abuse your power
  • You are trusted to be able to make such a decision.

I can live with that trust, I'm a moderator on another site, and I know the duplicates on my tag.

If you do not feel that you can trust yourself with all of the above. Either wait for a question to already have 3-4 votes before you go for the kill, or don't close duplicates at all.

  • A bit late to the party but: With vote to close, the user who asked the question can decide to "accept the duplicate". A comment doesn't allow that – Rémi Rousselet Sep 14 '18 at 14:26
25

Yes, please.

There is a feature-request on MSE that was created because some mods wanted to be able to cast a softer vote, rather than a completely binding one. Now that gold-badge users can do it also, this has become more important.

One of the problems we've always had on these sites is the unilateral close1 vote. I've seen moderators close questions because they didn't understand the context and didn't think it fit, when it was perfectly on-topic. Those with the powers of the unilateral close need to be able to have some discretion so that the community still makes the decisions and not just one mod.

1Also applies to the unilateral delete vote for mods

  • 2
    I agree, voting to close (not immediately doing so) could also be a way to cause attention to a post that one is not certain how to process, but that also does not seem quite right. A choice for either vote counts could be indeed a solution. Otherwise, as the OP says, some people could rather skip the post rather than act on it. – Ivaylo Slavov May 15 '14 at 20:07
  • 4
    If you recall, the feature request your citing was declined, for arguably good reasons. – Robert Harvey May 15 '14 at 20:16
  • @RobertHarvey, yes, it was declined, but hope springs eternal (and we have historical precedent where minds have changed and features implemented). – Lance Roberts May 15 '14 at 20:18
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    If a moderator is incorrectly voting to close posts based on a misunderstanding then the solution is to get them to not vote on posts that they don't understand, not to get them to case non-unilateral votes. If they knew they didn't understand the post they shouldn't have voted on it in the first place. If they didn't know that they didn't underhand it they wouldn't leverage the ability for a non-unilateral vote. – Servy May 15 '14 at 20:25
8

You currently have an array of choices, without further implementation constraints, for both marking and unmarking duplicates:

  • I agree it's a duplicate, with high confidence. - Vote.
  • I agree it's a duplicate, but I'm not confident. It's probably a good idea to leave a comment saying why you're teetering if you can, as you're probably not the only one having concerns. A discussion could be warranted.
  • I agree it's a duplicate, but I'm not sure the target is the best choice. - Better off leaving a comment there, as that means you probably want to kick off a discussion.
  • I agree it's a duplicate, but I know I have a better target. Fix it, (just edit the list).
  • I disagree that it's a duplicate, and I'm confident. Obviously, don't vote to close. If you're confident it's not a duplicate and it has been closed, reopen it (you have the power).
  • I disagree that it's a duplicate, but not really confident. The same thing about a short comment (or even meta) discussion holds here, if you're in doubt you're probably not alone.

And don't forget, the mightiest of the mighty of all super powers that every single user with close vote privileges has:

The mighty 'meh' vote, or writing an answer!

Sometimes the best thing to do is skip the hardest problems that only earn 1 point and focus on some of the easier ones, then come back to the ones you skipped, similar to strategies for standardized tests. The meh vote is one of indifference where you .. do absolutely nothing.

Another great way to help in cases where you're sure it's not a duplicate is to write an answer that's quite a ways away from what's given on other suggested duplicates. While this doesn't always hold true on more subjective sites (e.g. Meta sites), a difference in answers often indicates that the questions are substantially different, even if they seem quite similar.

The one thing we might be able to do is show comments from gold badge holders first in the comment sort order, but I'm not convinced that would be terribly helpful (and could, in some cases where folks lost their wits, be actively harmful).

So, if you find yourself wanting the wisdom of other collaborators to feel more confident, you probably want to be writing a comment instead.

However, it is a mod-like power, and that worries some folks.

If your concern revolves around not wanting to stand out as a single voter (thus, potentially opening you to more scrutiny), then you're probably observing a problem with the culture surrounding a particular tag that isn't making you feel as safe or comfortable as you should feel, which is a completely different problem that we're working on. We'd rather fix the bigger problem than put work-arounds in place to skirt around it.

Similarly, we're going to be really looking at the problem of people 'punishing' correct answers simply because they were written to what others perceived to be 'obvious duplicates'. I mention this because it's important to highlight additional reasons why some folks would not feel comfortable using the advice I gave above.

But, in the end, we shouldn't need to change the feature.

  • You don't have to reopen the question to mark it as another duplicate. – Makoto May 29 '18 at 15:21
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    @Kendra I was about to make a comment pointing that out. It is perhaps worth mentioning that there are cases in which it is worth it keeping both targets (i.e. when you have a better target, but the original target is reasonable on its own and different enough from yours to add something to the "answer"). – duplode May 29 '18 at 15:37
  • Shamelessly tangential note: If we find ourselves in one of your "not confident" scenarios, it is sometimes advisable to paraphrase comments to avoid the word "duplicate", especially if we think the question shouldn't be closed, or if the comments include relevant remarks beyond meta discussion about duplicates. The reason for doing so is strictly a technicality: the word "duplicate" can lead to useful comments being automatically deleted. (There isn't anything wrong with the word in itself, of course.) – duplode May 29 '18 at 15:49
  • How dare you suggest writing an answer to questions that could conceivably be a duplicate REEEEE – BoltClock May 30 '18 at 5:03
  • Forgot about that feature we rolled out to avoid reopening, updated! Thanks all. – Tim Post May 30 '18 at 13:05
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    Fun exercise: List as many features of stack overflow as you can without cheating by digging through meta. See how many you can think of. (That's actually a good idea for a swag contest). – Tim Post May 30 '18 at 13:05
1

Maybe give a choice for vote (if you're unsure, but leaning it should be closed)

If you're unsure, you should not be voting close. This is also true for those without the mighty mjölnir hammer.

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