2

This question already has an answer here:

Isn't there an advantage for old users who started using SO much earlier?

There are many basic questions that have been asked and answered in an early time when SO was launched. These questions are accessed and seen even today thousands of times per day. So such users get a higher reputation than ones who recently joined.

However, most questions asked today are very specific and thus would garner very few votes (It's likely only few select people will find it useful). If today some basic questions are asked they would be closed immediately.

So it would take much longer for new users to achieve a higher reputation than established users who have answered or asked some basic questions.

Shouldn't the reputation process be normalized keeping in mind the above disparity?

marked as duplicate by gnat, HaveNoDisplayName, Glorfindel, Luke, Mad Physicist Jul 12 '16 at 20:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @SList But an algorithm can be made to make atleast SO fair? – coder hacker May 15 '14 at 10:04
  • 1
    Who ever downvoted please give reason? The question is researched ( else how would I know about the trend), and its useful to new users – coder hacker May 15 '14 at 10:09
  • 1
    -1 will be because they answer "No" to "Shouldn't reputation process be normalized keeping in mind above disparity?". I know this is a dupe, can't find the target though.. – OGHaza May 15 '14 at 10:14
  • 1
    Find target and than vote. – coder hacker May 15 '14 at 10:15
  • 4
    It's not that hard to hit the rep cap just from recently-asked questions. (Or to put it another way: if we restricted reputation to votes cast on answers given in the last month, I think I'd still hit it every day, so my old answers aren't an advantage in that respect. You could argue that I'm more likely to get votes than a new user, but that's a different matter.) – Jon Skeet May 15 '14 at 10:21
  • 1
    deceze gave a 100 times more answers in his time than Tejas Patel in his time. The rep is 200 times higher (answers also float around for a longer time, ...) so I would say it is quite okay. Even as a new contributor you can get roughly as much reputation from answered questions than in the old times. One could back this by statistics though. – Trilarion May 15 '14 at 11:11
  • 3
    "If today some basic questions are asked they would be closed immediately." That's because they've already been asked before, not because they're not useful. I don't think it would be in any way fair to penalize users who have been here for years and have contributed thousands of answers. (Just my totally biased opinion.) – Bill the Lizard May 15 '14 at 11:48
  • 4
    Year 2020: Q: Advantage to Old Old Users - enjoy your advantage now, Patel ;) – brasofilo May 15 '14 at 11:52
  • 4
    How exactly is "normalisation" of rep points going to help anything? All it does is make you feel a little bit better at the expense of other people. Guess what? You have to earn them points, they are not just a right or allocation. – slugster May 15 '14 at 12:04
  • 2
    I think it's a bit like science. In the good old days, you became a science star for discovering that the earth revolves around the sun. Today, you have to be a lot more specific to make a dent... – tobias_k Jul 7 '14 at 10:52
  • @slugster: basically by melting old earnings. Trust is not forever. If you are not active now and not perform now as you did earlier the community's trust also should decrease in you. The community should know how can it trust you now not how could it trust you 5 years before. – g.pickardou Apr 30 '16 at 10:24
  • @tobias: No it's not. Although now seems to be easy to discover Kepler's and Newtons theorems, it was as hard in their time as 11th dimension string theory today. The same is not true for the question and answer: "How can I find a substring in language X". It was easy to answer at hist time. Now just the question is credited with 25k – g.pickardou Apr 30 '16 at 10:31
  • 1
    @g.pickardou If you are not active now and not perform now as you did earlier the community's trust also should decrease in you. Nope, you are fundamentally wrong there. The votes are a measure of trust in the answer as much as the author. An answer five years later is still as good for the question as it was when first tendered - it shouldn't lose trust because the author is less active. Anyway this is an old discussion which I have no intention of resurrecting and re-litigating all over again. – slugster Apr 30 '16 at 12:16
51

Yes. Welcome to life. I ain't be getting anywhere in World of Warcraft either if I started now. Or get rich mining Bitcoins...

But SE isn't a competition. SE magic unicorn points do not make you rich, famous, money or get you the ladies. "Hey ladies, I've got 200k interweb points on SO!" ... Yeah, has never worked so far, sorry.
Except for Jon Skeet, for whom all of the above works.

Reputation isn't a game for its own sake; it's a mechanism created to measure trust in you by the system. Older users are naturally more trusted to know and understand and properly take care of the system than new users. That's by design.

You can still contribute to the community in a meaningful way by providing great content or improving existing content and by participating in the betterment of the community and the site on Meta. That'll eventually get you heard and make you feel good too. And may eventually culminate in a bunch of unitard points as well.

I would also say that more trivial questions are asked every day on SO than ever before. It's pretty easy to write decent answers (if you can, that is) to a bunch of trivial questions and gain upvotes (albeit that most of those questions should arguably be closed, but that's another topic). I still regularly hit my mortarboard on new questions I answered that day, not on old content. I think the chances of becoming a high rep user are as good as ever. It's just that others have a few years head start.

  • 3
    You're right that MUP don't necessarily give you fame and fortune... But sometimes you get a cake out of it :D – Lix May 15 '14 at 10:35
  • 1
    ROFL. I admit I got a t-shirt, a tossing game and a bunch of stickers out of it... ^_^;; – deceze May 15 '14 at 10:37
  • Wanna trade a slice of cake for a meta sticker? – Lix May 15 '14 at 10:37
  • 1
    If that's still the same cake @Lix, perhaps the OP might want to reconsider. – Bart May 15 '14 at 10:38
  • 3
    @Bart - tisk tisk tisk...jealousy makes you nasty :P In any case the cake has been perfectly preserved... I placed a historical lock on it. – Lix May 15 '14 at 10:39
  • 1
    @Lix Since you've hit your 10k a while back... I'll pass. ;) – deceze May 15 '14 at 10:41
  • Fine then.. More 10Kake for me! You're both officially un-invited from my 50K barbecue. :( – Lix May 15 '14 at 10:45
  • @Lix Even if I bring a 50Keg? – deceze May 15 '14 at 10:46
  • 1
    @deceze - ok ok ok... maybe I spoke too fast :P – Lix May 15 '14 at 10:47
  • 3
    You wrote: "..Older users are naturally more trusted .". If this would be true, we also can give points for years, what we obviously not doing, – g.pickardou Oct 16 '15 at 20:13
  • the person who asked this question got like 4,000 reputation points: stackoverflow.com/questions/63447/…. Clearly that shouldn't imply that they 'naturally [are] more trusted to know and understand and properly take care of the system' – dashnick Dec 30 '16 at 20:38
  • " it's a mechanism created to measure trust" Absolutely, so why an user may get 20k from a stupid question while a current user need month or hard work for it?. Your answer has no point sorry. – Adrian Maire Jul 11 '17 at 12:49
  • @Adrian That's a bit hyperbolic. There are only a handful of questions where this ever happened, and even then it took years, sometimes close to a decade. Those suboptimal exceptions don't define the norm. – deceze Jul 11 '17 at 12:59
  • @deceze: They are not exceptions! There are already plenty of people complaining about that, we could just close eyes or try to improve. The point is, people with much harder work, quality and expressed knowledge are getting limited reputation compared to early trivial questions that 99% of newbies find helpful. SO has now relevance enough in the world to make this reputation valuable. – Adrian Maire Jul 11 '17 at 13:07
  • @Adrian Then feel free to suggest a way to remedy this and have the community throw their votes in on the issue. – deceze Jul 11 '17 at 13:09
-7

From SO What is Reputation "Reputation is a rough measurement of how much the community trusts you".

According to this definition in my answer I am focusing on meaning of trust and not meaning of the word "reputation". I also try to explain how the current system is (re)creating the advantage, why it is not perfect for measuring trust level, why the time will make it worst, and also trying to explain why will it so hard change. (well, it will change, keep reading)

Answer:

Yes, there is an advantage and it will be very hard to change. However your question is a step toward that.

Here is why:

  • Who wants melted her/his fortune?
  • Who wants to really be challenged by newcomers, when it is possible to not to?

Nobody.

I simply do not understand why would be more trustable who asked 8 years ago "How to find a substring in X language?" (now with 25k) then did nothing for 7.999 years compared to someone who actively answering 100s of specific questions in the last 1 year? Can anyone who state that this is a working system, and needs no change?

It is possible to earn 100s points daily by doing nothing, not even logging in. I have only less than 4k, but I am also earning 5-10 daily just for my old existing questions.

One of the comments mention a person who has earned 2000 within 28 days. Surely she/he must work hard. Well, as a reward actually the difference his points and a person who has say 100k are increased. The modest estimate for a 100k person earns 100 points per day by just doing nothing, so she/he earned 2800 (or more) same time, and her/his advantage increased by 800 points. compared to the month hard working member. That's a problem. (to be clear: I am not stating that the 100k person did nothing during that time.)

Easy to see that this effect described above is strengthening itself. That's also a problem. The advantages (the difference between points) will increase, the point numbers diverge. (instead of converge) With other words: The time will not solve it as some comments state. You will never catch up those who have such a big advantage.

Some idea to a potential change:

Reputation, trust, karma is melting thing. You must earn it day by day. One good answer what you gave your fellow developer 10 years ago is not multiplied by 10000 value for today. It's not like as an IBM share. Instead it is forgotten.

  • 5
    Stack Overflow reputation is not a peer-reviewed mathematical model for tracking your actual real world reputation, and it's not supposed to be. It's just a name for what other sites call karma, or experience points, or clout, or a dozen other names. If you actually want rep, go work at it. Here s a person who has been a member of the site for 28 days and has over 2000 reputation, gained by actually using the site, rather than complaining about it. – meagar Apr 29 '16 at 18:24
  • 2
    1) Nobody complains for reputation, at least I was not. 2) About your arguments: Calling something to "reputation" then reject ideas what makes it closer to its real world meaning: it stinks a bit. 3: Regardless how we call it, all we agree it is related to trust level for a member. My arguments in the my answer are mainly related to this meaning (trust level) not the meaning of reputation. – g.pickardou Apr 30 '16 at 9:46
  • 1
    To answering the interesting fact that there is a person who has earned 2000 within 28 days. Surely she/he must work hard. Well, as a reward actually the difference his points and a person who has say 100k are increased. The modest estimate for a 100k person earns 100 points per day by just doing nothing.so she/he earned 2800 (or more) same time, and her/his advantage increased by 800 points. compared to the month hard working member. That's a problem. (to be clear: I am not stating that the 100k person did nothing during that time.) – g.pickardou Apr 30 '16 at 10:39
  • @g.pickardou your answer is not very readable and difficult to figure out what point you are trying to make with your Edit / End Edit through the answer. If you are going to edit your answer to change/clarify your point, please just edit and don't leave the old content. It will make your answers much clearer – psubsee2003 Apr 30 '16 at 10:51
  • 1
    OK, I just wanted to make clear my answers to the comment(s). But now I deleted all the edits – g.pickardou Apr 30 '16 at 11:25
  • 2
    -10 wooo. On this question i notice that Insiders downvote outsiders which point a real problem : old answers , same with low quality have many more points than recent answers with better quality. That doesn't mean that all insiders don't deserve their reputation but for some of them, we can not deny it is the case and so the reputation system seems having a bug. – davidxxx Aug 18 '16 at 21:42
  • 3
    I think you are 100% right, but exactly as you predicted, you got -13 from exactly those who own high rep. – Adrian Maire Jul 11 '17 at 12:52

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .