-14

I wanted to make a dedicated question/post to help aggregate and get some real feedback disseminated about how to attack the issue of out-of-control downvoting (we all know it exists). Here's a short summary of this issue: way too many questions, several of which have potential, end up with 10+ downvotes and no comment that even hints at why.

I've personally, at only about 185 rep, have seen too many to simply search for single examples of this problem. I'm not talking about obvious, bug-ridden ones like this, but ones that have a little more potential.

Feel free and answer here with any other ideas that you personally have to rectify this problem. All of us can come up with a lot more useful ideas than just one of us.


I do have some guidelines for answers and comments to set from the start:

  1. Please keep all feedback not itself giving suggestions for potential solutions (or parts of) in the relevant comments section. This includes feedback regarding other answers.

  2. Please keep civil about this. Conflict cannot be solved by conflict.

  3. Discussion on when to downvote, "Why is X downvoted?", etc. is off-topic here.

EDIT: Here's a similar question on MSE that also has some useful ideas for here. I will link to here in an answer here.

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  • 1
    I actually haven't had a problem with out-of-control downvoting. In most cases when I have received downvotes, they are entirely legitimate, and I usually have my reasons when I downvote, which I will often voice in a comment.
    – icktoofay
    May 4, 2014 at 0:43
  • 5
    Why is downvoting a problem? Serial voting (up or down) is already dealt with by the system.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 0:44
  • I'll edit the question to emphasize that it is the downvoting without letting anyone know why. May 4, 2014 at 0:58
  • 1
    Let me refer you to Encouraging people to explain downvotes.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:03
  • I know, but I didn't think to look on MSE for that. It does personally seem the worst here (in relation to other sites), which makes this post still to some extent necessary. I will update the title accordingly. May 4, 2014 at 1:07
  • 4
    On the contrary; people are too shy to downvote bad questions and unhelpful answers. Why do you feel that there is too much downvoting going on?
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:13
  • @MartijnPieters The issue seems to me, from reading the flood of downvoting-related posts her on this Meta, that the issue isn't as much the newer people as the more experienced members and moderators. May 4, 2014 at 1:25
  • 2
    How are they a problem, exactly?
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:25
  • Please do me a favor and take a look at this search. It'll save me a lot of explaining. May 4, 2014 at 1:30
  • 1
    You will never control human behavior. And attempting to be polite to people who will just be upset is like… “Son, you wait here while Daddy tries to talk some sense into this raving derelict.” imgur.com/r/thesimpsons/AcTNZqx May 4, 2014 at 1:33
  • 2
    I am very active on Meta and already familiar with most posts on that tag. They vary widely; discussing when to down vote, what to do if you were serial-downvoted, should a downvoted answer be kept, etc. very few if those are about problematic downvotes (where someone wants to know why they were downvoted). There is certainly no pattern there that helps me understand why you feel there is a problem anywhere.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:40
  • 1
    And being downvoted can hurt; of course there are going to be questions on Meta about that. But that alone doesn't make it a problem the community needs to address!
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:42
  • @JakeGould Point taken. May 4, 2014 at 1:45
  • 1
    Regarding explanations for downvotes, I've opened a detailed feature-request for it, please see Revisiting Optional Explanations for Downvotes (on Questions).
    – user456814
    May 5, 2014 at 0:17

3 Answers 3

9

When you go to a voting booth and vote on a political candidate, do you have somebody come up to you afterwards and ask you "how did you vote, and why?" Are you forced to talk to them? Of course not. If you were, how do you suppose it would affect the way you would feel about voting in future elections?

The same principle applies to voting on Stack Overflow. People are not obligated to explain their downvotes. Ever.

The way you improve the votes you receive is by getting better at asking and answering questions. One of the best ways to do that is study someone who seems to always get favorable votes; examine the way they interact with the community, and the nature of the content that they post. Polling the people who vote on your posts is never necessary to achieve this.

1
  • 1
    I'll only say this: I voted.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:14
-5

SE is crowdsourced; however, the pool of those who have the privileges to vote is limited and they tend to vote similarly to one another.

It's not that they intentionally vote with one another, but like all majority/minority settings a majority will advance those who think like them, while putting down those they do not think like them. That creates a power dynamic on SE where only people who think like those at the top get the chance to advance themselves.

That's why, despite overwhelming support in the commentary of nearly every suggestion for a system that would "fix" downvoting is still met with an equally overwhelming number of downvotes. You need reputation in order to vote, and you can't get that reputation unless you post things people who already have the reputation agree with.

There are a few fixes I would suggest, the first being that there should be a cap on how many downvotes a post may receive in any given time period. Just as you're limited to +200 reputation for upvotes, there should be a cap on downvotes (-20 perhaps).

Secondly, there should be a regular metadata search of user activity to look for serial downvoting. I get a strong sense that downvotes occur from a minority group who are the most vocal on Stack pages. However, since I don't have access to that data these views are pure speculation. Grabbing the data would be a simple query, and would provide a lot of useful information (if it's not already done).

Third, downvoting happens for the wrong reason all the time, the most common is to help promote a "better" answer, which is purely a subjective idea and should be the responsibility of the OP. The only downvotes should happen if a post is "not useful" to the original question.

Lastly, if leaving a comment were required for downvotes it could be summarized by the following choices anonymously displayed and presented to the OP only:

Answer does not address the question. Answer contains errors or incorrect data.

All other reasons for a downvote would likely be covered under the Close options and addressed in that manner. A person's subjective opinion about a question should never be a good enough reason for a downvote. This is a site for factual data and solutions only.

9
  • I believe there are already automated systems in place to detect and reverse serial downvoting.
    – F1Krazy
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:36
  • As far as I am aware, @F1Krazy, there is a method of detecting serial downvoting that happens within a short time period, but I don't know if it works to identify users who do almost exclusively downvotes across the site while contributing little to no positive feedback (negative Nelly's if you will).
    – mkinson
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:38
  • There's no method of detecting valid votes, no, time was instead spent on catching/reversing fraud.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:42
  • 1
    "A person's subjective opinion about a question should never be a good enough reason for a downvote." if the voting criteria wasn't subjective, we wouldn't need people to vote at all.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:44
  • @KevinB Critical thinking, dispassionate, unbiased, informed... Those are the sorts of concepts that should be associated to an up or downvote.
    – mkinson
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:46
  • 1
    "I get a strong sense that downvotes occur from a minority group" that has been proven a few times, there's a very small group of users who actually are willing to spend their rep to better the quality of the network. (most of which are meta regulars or at the very least regularly visit/read meta)
    – Kevin B
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:46
  • 1
    "Third, downvoting happens for the wrong reason all the time, the most common is to help promote a "better" answer, which is purely a subjective idea and should be the responsibility of the OP." eh, that might occur occasionally? But among the most likely user group to be providing answers, it's rare that you'll find such users willing to spend their own rep for that purpose. I'd certainly not call it the most common.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:50
  • @KevinB I meant the most common of "wrong" reasons, not the most common reason for a downvote. My apologies for not being clear.
    – mkinson
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:52
  • 1
    "there should be a cap on how many downvotes a post may receive in any given time period" it's super rare for a post on SO to receive more than 6 or 7 downvotes without being deleted within the hour.
    – Kevin B
    Nov 4, 2021 at 15:52
-11

I personally would like to suggest a dialog with a text box similar to the dialog interface for flagging posts (if you choose the option "Other") to type an explanation. It would be displayed below the question as a normal comment The .

It may be optional, and clearly explained that it is through the UI, and the button post a comment if there is any text and just close otherwise (or make it two separate buttons...works just as well).

Without any explanation, it is awfully hard to figure out why it isn't a good question, and how to correct it such that it is. Also, I have seen in a few questions the asker asking why their question was downvoted (don't remember exact titles...too many to remember).

This should make it a bit more convenient to make a comment after a downvote and subtly get people to explain more often (even though it is clearly optional...just made a little more convenient and welcoming to do so).

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  • 6
    This is open to enormous abuse; anonymous commenting for the low price of a downvote? I can already see the freeform trolling this will bring.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 0:45
  • @MartijnPieters and all the downvoters: Maybe without the anonymity? May 4, 2014 at 0:55
  • 1
    We already have that; that's what comments are for.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 0:56
  • @MartijnPieters It more or less would make it easier to make the comment and also make it mandatory. May 4, 2014 at 0:57
  • 3
    We'll never make it mandatory! There are very good reasons voting is anonymous today; mandatory commenting would take the anonymity away. That is not going to happen.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:00
  • 3
    Besides; people'll just fill in nonsense to skirt around the mandatory comment requirement.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:05
  • @MartijnPieters If we really made comments mandatory, junk comments could probably be moderated and the downvote removed. But I agree it's not a good idea. May 4, 2014 at 1:07
  • @impinball Compromising the anonymity of downvotes will encourage revenge downvoting.
    – Louis
    May 4, 2014 at 1:08
  • 1
    @Ben: sure, but why add to the moderation burden.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:08
  • @MartijnPieters I agree May 4, 2014 at 1:09
  • 4
    In short: mandatory commenting would lead to more retaliation voting, and to a drop in downvoting as people don't want to be targeted. We really don't want that; downvoting is a central tool to maintain quality and we really don't want to discourage people from using it.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    May 4, 2014 at 1:11
  • Maybe make the feedback optional, but the dialog remains. It would make it a little more convenient to comment from a downvote, but a prominent button to post a comment if text was entered and close otherwise. It should be made clear that downvoting is optional, but social manipulation does wonders (advertising uses it extensively). May 4, 2014 at 1:18
  • I've updated the suggestion accordingly. May 4, 2014 at 1:23

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