-75

I received the first downvote for that question several seconds after publication. The person did not even read the whole post, but just downvoted. It is very good example of the downvote system malignancy.

I think the downvote system for questions is malignant.

For questions: I think downvoting for questions should be removed. Why people usually downvote:

  • Question is too simple for them.
  • Question is too hard for them to understand.
  • Poor question grammar.
  • Poorly explained question.
  • Possible duplicate.
  • They don't like topic to which question is related to (programming language, library, software, etc.).
  • They don't like person who asks the question.

I think none of above is reason for downvote. Why I think there is no reason for downvote?

  • Question is too simple for them. May be it is simple for you, but hard for other person. The websites such as Stack Overflow is for answering questions that others don't know and ask for questions what you don't know. What is wrong if person don't know something that is simple for you and asks you and others question about it? I think it is good when someone seeks knowledge. No reason for downvote.
  • Question is too hard for them to understand. If you don't understand question and it is hard for you to answer, let other people who knows more about that topic or field to answer. No reason for downvote.
  • Poor question grammar. Not all peoples' native language is English. In case you see poor grammar just edit the question. No reason for downvote.
  • Poorly explained question. Make a comment, ask for more clarification. Or if you are sure that you understand the question, but you think you can improve it just edit the question. No reason for downvote.
  • Possible duplicate. Sometimes it is not easy to find an already-answered question. Add comment with the link of answer. No reason for downvote.
  • They don't like the topic to which the question is related to (programming language, library, software, etc.). We are all different, and if there is something you don't like there maybe person that likes it. Nothing wrong with that. No reason for downvote.
  • They don't like person who asks the question. Stack Overflow is not place for personal revenge. It is not a battlefield. Here people are trying to help each other and improve there knowledge. No reason for downvote.

I think there is no actual reasons for downvoting questions. I suggest to remove downvoting for questions.

  • 1
    The only question of yours that got downvoted is the very first one you asked. What's the pr0blem? – Robert Harvey Apr 27 '14 at 5:34
  • 53
    I disagree with this. Reason for downvote. – BoltClock Apr 27 '14 at 5:40
  • 9
    Just noticed your later edit, FWIW I'm the one who downvoted first within say 20 seconds because your excellent formatting made it very easy for me to quickly identify that I disagreed with just about all points. If this was a question on a main site I might have upvoted it instead fairly quickly for being so clearly expressed. – PeterJ Apr 27 '14 at 13:53
  • 22
    Do you really believe it's impossible for a question to be bad enough to be worth a downvote to discourage that sort of behaviour? I think about half of the reasons you've given are perfectly valid reasons for downvotes. If you want to ask a question, put effort into it - simply doing that will get rid of most reasons for downvotes. I rarely take less than about 15 minutes to write a question, and often it's significantly longer. – Jon Skeet Apr 27 '14 at 14:46
  • 1
    See also Why do people downvote questions?. – user456814 May 6 '14 at 19:37
  • 14
    New law discovered: Suggesting removal of downvotes automatically gets you downvoted. (does anybody want to try suggesting removal of upvotes? many upvotes to win!) – Gras Double Jul 23 '14 at 18:56
  • 2
    @Double Gras It is downvote system malignancy in action. – vasili111 Jul 23 '14 at 19:25
  • 5
    @vasili111 Regarding your bold edit, you're confusing downvotes on Meta and downvotes on the main site. – Bruno Jul 23 '14 at 21:25
  • @Bruno There are several reasons for downvotes on main site and my question text includes most part of them. My bold text includes two examples of them. The reasons here and on main site is actually the same. – vasili111 Jul 24 '14 at 6:28
  • 2
    Regarding your edit: you cannot use voting on Meta as an indication here. Read What's Meta to find out what differs between the main site and here. Downvotes on posts tagged feature-request indicate disagreement with the proposed change. – AstroCB Aug 1 '14 at 3:34
  • @AstroCB I edited bold text. – vasili111 Aug 1 '14 at 4:13
  • I agree that there is some kind of downvote system malignancy, but also I disagree with removing downvotes, just because sometimes a question deserves for the several reasons pointed in the discussion on this whole thread. – Rafael Eyng Dec 23 '14 at 11:00
  • 1
    I would rather purpose a change in downvote, taking away more reputation from the downvoter. This way people would think a bit before downvoting too quickly. – Btc Sources Mar 8 '15 at 21:25
  • 1
    Think about it -- what good are all those points? The only things you can use them for are bounties and downvotes. And bounties are pretty much useless. So why not downvote? – Hot Licks Jul 19 '15 at 1:11
  • 7
    I downvote a lot of questions for lack of research. I also downvote a lot of questions because they do not include the info they should. Yes, one can simply leave a comment (I often do), but too many people are lazy and will not change their ways without some "incentive". (And there are some dupes that occur so frequently that they deserve a -10 downvote.) – Hot Licks Jul 19 '15 at 12:40
55

I'll address your bullets in turn.

  • Simple questions are not discouraged on Stack Overflow. But unresearched questions are. Asking a question whose answer can easily be found in a manual or online resource just wastes everyone's time.

  • Good questions should be easy to understand, not hard. We don't downvote people for asking questions that are difficult to answer, only for questions that are impossible to decipher.

  • Poor question grammar - This one is easy to fix; run your question through an English grammar and spell checker before posting it.

  • Poorly explained question - Ask the duck first.

  • Possible duplicate - We don't downvote people for asking duplicate questions unless it is apparent that the asker didn't bother to search first.

  • We don't like the topic - The examples you've cited seem to describe questions that have no real answer, but only opinions. We're not here to paint the bikeshed; we're here to answer your questions. Check Amazon if you want book recommendations.

  • We don't like the person... Well, nobody downvotes people for that, and if they do, they won't last here long.

  • 2
    Adding onto that second bullet point, if the question is hard to understand, it's also hard to answer; if we can't understand the question then there's no good way for us to know how to help (how do we know if we answered the question if we don't know what the question is?). It also won't have as much lasting value for the next guy who happens to stumble on the question while searching for help online for his own problem. – Dennis Meng Apr 27 '14 at 7:17
  • 4
    Less questions, more rubber-ducking! :D Cupcake calls his duck "Steve". Cupcake's coworkers look at him funny, but Steve gets Cupcake, and Cupcake gets Steve :D <3 <3 <3. – user456814 May 4 '14 at 14:42
  • 1
    I like the inclusive "we" for subjectively downvoting subjectively offensive questions. I mean, subjectively, we all agree right? – thepip3r Jun 5 '17 at 20:29
  • @thepip3r: Not sure what you're referring to. The OP never mentioned offensive questions, nor did I. – Robert Harvey Jun 6 '17 at 0:45
  • 1
    I was trying to be overly sarcastic to convey the nature with which this topic is covered on SO. Someone finds a question "offensive" (e.g. too dumb, too basic, they don't understand it) and the ubiquitous use of "we" to indicate there's some set of iron-clad rules governing legitimate down-voting. – thepip3r Jun 6 '17 at 14:10
  • I've never seen that duck story before -- A great read, good to understand :) – Davy M Dec 8 '17 at 4:37
14

I think there is no actual reasons for downvoting questions.

But how will I convey to the rest of the world that I feel that this question is not helpful or does not show research effort?

What is the real gain for taking away the ability to help push poor questions lower than better (or even great) questions?

Let me phrase it in another manner. There are questions out there, in any tag you could think of, that are either not adequately searched out (i.e. duplicates), poorly explained, or so temporal in scope (i.e. compilation failures due to typos) that it kind of overwhelms the well-researched, well-explained, and rational questions.

Allowing questions of poorer quality to spend prolonged periods of time in front of professionals may discourage them from participating, as those questions could be answered through a bit of trivial research or through better investigation of their own problem.

You might think that this ties into the "too simple" portion of your complaint. But where you say "too simple", I think "not researched enough". Putting in that extra ten minutes of Google time is well worth it, for everyone involved.

To your points of "poor grammar" and "poorly explained question", this is where the community gets to step in and help improve the situation.

  • Is the grammar of the question abysmal? Edit it! Give it a good once-over with a spell check, and see if it makes sense to you just by rewriting it in a few places. (Very important: don't edit code or you may lose a lot of context)

  • Is the question not adequately explained? Comment on it! Ask the OP for some more clarification or details on what they're trying to convey. Now, if they simply don't come back and explain what problem they're having, then it really isn't adequately explained, nor answerable.

There are others that have countered your points systematically; I've only covered a handful - the few I felt were pertinent. I can't imagine a scenario in which someone would systematically downvote every question they saw because they didn't like the language (chiefly because there are measures in place to ensure voting fraud doesn't go unnoticed); besides, that'd be a bit silly. I mean, I have no shortage of disdain for C# and .NET (for whatever reasons), but I don't even participate in questions that have those tags on them, save for a bit of copy-editing.

5
  • Question is too simple for them.

I think this may occasionally occur but not typically unless it is because it is obvious that the OP hasn't even tried to find the issue on there own with something like a simple Google search.

  • Question is too hard for them to understand.

Do you have any evidence of this?

  • Poor question grammar.

Unfortunately, this probably does happen from time to time. However, most users who care about the site will not downvote these questions if this is the only problem. This is why we have edits. We typically edit questions into shape when we can if that is all that is wrong.

  • Poorly explained question.

Yes, these are and should be downvoted. If the question isn't explained correctly then answering clearly is nearly impossible.

  • Possible duplicate.

Again, yes. SE has some pretty good search algorithms and mechanisms to help you remember and know that you have searched for this problem. If you haven't taken the time to do a simple search then you deserve a downvote on your question. We take time out of our busy lives to help you so if you have a question then you should take the time to do a quick search.

  • They don't like topic to which question is related to (programming language, library, software, etc.).

I'm sorry, we would need links to examples here. Almost no one is going to downvote for this reason.

  • They don't like person who asks the question.

Ah, bullying. That sucks but I don't think it happens on here too often for this reason. Most members have grown out of it.

  • 4
    And even when bullying does happen we have tools to mitigate that so that makes it a non-issue (except for people who choose to self-victimize of course; those people can't be helped). – BoltClock Apr 27 '14 at 5:44
  • @BoltClock good point and agreed. As long as it can be validated. – codeMagic Apr 27 '14 at 5:45
1

Why don't we just remove downvotes?

Removing downvotes just means that some questions have lots of upvotes, and others don't get any votes. What's the purpose of removing them? All you do is stop that sad red -2 from your imaginary SO treasure chest and everybody's a winner, right?

From the perspective of reputation, it dilutes it and makes it worth less than it is today. Overall, we'll just get more upvotes -- a lot for a good question, a bit for an okay question, and zero for a bad question.

What we lose is the ability to discern questions which are poor from those which are merely difficult or in a niche area which hasn't got much attention. As well, if a user has problematic behaviour with numerous low-quality posts, we cannot signal that it is negative, unwanted behaviour easily and quickly.

The community needs to be able to both reward good habits and provide "punishments" (i.e. downvotes) to be able to effectively reinforce user behaviour.


Let's take a look at some of your points:

Question is too simple for them. May be it is simple for you but hard for other person. The websites such as stackoverflow is for answering questions that others don't know and ask for questions what you don't know. What is wrong if person don't knows something that is simple for you and asks you and others question about it? I think it is good when someone seeks knowledge. No reason for downvote.

Stack Overflow isn't everything for everyone. For a few years, we actually tried out this concept of "no question is too simple", with some going to extremes to try and prove their point. In the end, we found out that this attitude wasn't benefiting the community enough to outweigh the disadvantages.

Possible duplicate. Some times it is not easy to find already answered question. Add comment with the link of answer. No reason for downvote.

Some things are harder to find than others. In my opinion, voting depends on the difficulty of finding this question. However, there are some things which are ridiculously easy to find and well-worthy of downvoting. For example, if you ask a question about "[javascript] how to add up two numbers in strings" you're going to get downvoted, for good reason

Poor question grammar. Not all peoples native language is English. In case you see poor grammar just edit the question. No reason for downvote.

We understand that not everyone has the best English ability. However, if you're just writing lazily just to deliberately make other people lives harder (who have to understand your question), people are going to downvote your question.

Poorly explained question. Make a comment, ask for more clarification. Or if you are sure that you understand the question but you think you can improve it just edit the question. No reason for downvote.

If the question is overall understanable but there's something that needs clarification, most of the time I see people commenting about that.

However, there are some things which are pretty obvious that need to be in a question. If you have a compiler error and you don't even include your code (for example, just an error dump and "plz halp me!!!"), it's fairly obvious that we can't solve the issue at all. That's a perfectly valid reason to downvote.

They don't like topic to which question is related to (programming language, library, software, etc.). We are all different and if there is something you don't like there maybe person that likes it. Nothing wrong with that. No reason for downvote.

They don't like person who asks the question. Stackoverflow is not place for personal revenge. It is not battlefield. Here people are trying to help each other and improve there knowledge. No reason for downvote.

Question is too hard for them to understand. If you don't understand question and it is hard for you to answer, let other people who knows more about that topic or field to answer. No reason for downvote.

As all of these reasons are related to personal matters, I'll address these together. These are definitely not good reasons to downvote, though it is hard to police something without these votes not being anonymous, which is fundamental to the voting system.

  • @dmckee: so you're saying that we need downvotes, right? I'm definitely not saying that we should remove downvotes, unless what I've typed up is completely different to what's in my head. – Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 27 '14 at 14:54
  • My apologies. I did misread your intent. Or more to the point didn't read far beyond the first paragraph or two. – dmckee Apr 27 '14 at 15:01
  • @dmckee: yes, indeed those first two paragraphs didn't convey what I intended too well. I've reworded it to make my point more explicit. – Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 27 '14 at 15:16
-6

As a new user, I was surprised by the downvotes for the question I asked, though reputation was the least that would matter for a newbie. I searched for this and found there are valid reasons for the downvote.

But the problem is:

  1. I do not know the reason why it was downvoted so that I can correct myself next time.
  2. There is no system to challenge it, in cases where it has been unfairly downvoted
  3. A user will not be able to improve his English, just because he is downvoted. Not everyone has good hold on English

The overall objective is to have the well-defined and rationale questions above the rest in the stack. So I understand the intention, however there seems to be lack of communication.

Can the person who downvotes provide the reason (even if selectable from the list of options) and that reason for downvote be displayed anonyomously to the person asking the question?

That would help communicate the issue more effectively and improve the overall quality of this site - which is the objective behind this downvote system.

  • "Can the person who downvotes provide the reason" Yes, but they will never be forced to do so. – Sir E_net4 the Downvoter Feb 11 at 13:42
  • See, even here I am clueless why this was downvoted. All I told was when someone clicks downvote, give 4 or 5 choices and he just selects it. The person on the receiving end will at least get an idea / reason and will be able to correct oneself. – Guru Feb 11 at 14:00
  • Voting in Meta is a bit different. You may see them as a non-exclusive combination of (1) the answer not being useful, (2) the answer lacking research effort, or (3) the community simply disagreeing with your position/premises. In this case, feature requests for providing feedback on downvotes have been discussed ad nauseam on this site, to the point that a canonical answer was made in the link I posted above. Hence, any attempt of proposing something of this sort would require much more argumentation than what you have in this answer. – Sir E_net4 the Downvoter Feb 11 at 14:06
  • 4
    Your question had three comments on it indicating different pieces of information were missing. You did get comments on why your post was problematic. You never once edited your question to include that information. You can't complain about not being given information when you were in fact given that information. – Servy Feb 11 at 14:37
  • 1
    Technically, the only types of voting that's considered unfair are 1) serial voting and 2) sock puppet votes. The system otherwise doesn't attempt to police user's reasons for voting. (How would you prove an anonymous voter didn't honestly think your question wasn't useful?) Looking at your question, I don't think grammar was the issue with the down votes. – BSMP Feb 11 at 21:37
  • The ecosystem does not allow me to comment nor upvote/downvote an already existing request. This was the only way I can communicate with the community until I can earn that much of credits. So basically I am being told STFU and just be a consumer, don't try to be a contributor. We have BIG guys and experts here who are already doing a fantastic job. So @E_net4, this means 2 persons out of millions disagreed with this and others in community are not bothered/neutral about it. Anyways thanks for your explanation n the matter is put to rest. On other note this community IS doing fantastic job – Guru Feb 12 at 5:10
-8

The downvoting system is complete tosh!

I had spent over a day trying to figure out a problem. Eventually I turned to my old friend SO. I asked a succinct question with a working example and the output.

After using SO for some considerable time, I have learnt how to better ask questions. IMO my question was valid, well phrased... basically, everything a good question should be. Some blighter came along and down voted without a comment.

I re-read my question... scratched my head... I couldn't see what the problem was. And when I got an answer (which was correct) I still couldn't see the reason for the down vote. If anything, the answer showed that this wasn't a question which was readily google'able.

I have less issue with DWOCs (Downvote WithOut Comment) of $%!£ questions but in my case I was frustrated that I had taken time to try and solve my problem and took time to write a good question. I always re-read my questions several times to make sure a) they are complete b) I haven't missed something obvious c) asking the duck often solves the problem. So when some oink comes along and down votes for no reason, it really bites.

DWOC'ing good questions puts people off the site and will no doubt cause their question to get overlooked by someone who knows the answer (and who isn't a DWOC'er).

And as proof of the system, just watch how quick this gets down voted :)

The DWOC'ers don't like being criticized :D

-20

I know some people are getting afraid to answer or ask on SO, just because they can lose their "reputation" in here. I knew people that made another account, just to ask a question, instead of using their real account.

In some chats, I've talked about, if a question has some grammatical errors, or if it wasn't explained very well, just don't answer it, doesn't need downvotes.

If an answer didn't answer the question, "upvote" the answer which really does, instead of downvoting other people's answer.

  • 5
    see why people are afraid, people downvoting this answer, usually, people who do this, are that ones who downvote to get their answer choosen – Sirius_Black Apr 27 '14 at 9:16
  • 6
    I don't have an answer on this question, and i'm still downvoting. :P A point or two means nothing in the long run. It's only a problem if it's consistent -- in which case the votee might want to consider that maybe that schmuck in the mirror is part of the problem. – cHao Apr 27 '14 at 13:39
  • 4
    An inaccurate or incorrect answer should be down-voted and you have the freedom to leave a comment explaining why. A down-vote will alert the answerer and hence will rush to correct it. You can retract your vote once the answer is corrected. – Omar Apr 27 '14 at 13:58
  • 1
    the fact is, if the answer for the question is not the right answer, who will judge that, is the OP, so i think, that the OP can downvote the answer, if he found it is not constructive, since downvoting answers in here became "tatical", and whenever someone talks about downvoting, they receive downvotes just encouraging them, to not talk about it – Sirius_Black Apr 27 '14 at 22:53
  • 7
    @Sirius_Black I see, that must be your problem. You seem to think that this is a site where people come to ask questions and get answers. That is not what this site is about. This site is a place designed to create a repository of knowledge, useful to the worldwide programming community. It does so by allowing people to ask and answer questions, and evaluating the quality of those posts. You seem to think that as long as the OP knows that an answer is good/bad it's enough. It's not. The OP is of fairly low priority. It's every single other reader from Google that's the priority. – Servy May 2 '14 at 19:08
  • 3
    Answers are downvoted so that all of those future googlers can quickly see that a given post is not worth their time to evaluate, rather than forcing them to spend considerable time reading, attempting to understand, utilize, and then recognize the failures, of a bad answer. We don't want every reader to go through all of that, we want them to know just glancing at the post that it's wrong by checking its score. – Servy May 2 '14 at 19:09
  • 1
    @Servy I wonder if I'm the only one who deliberately clicks that downvoted question specifically because I know downvotes are more often than not unwarranted. Plus they come in waves, so a highly downvoted question is probably more interesting than one with a single downvote. – tar Jul 24 '14 at 6:57
  • 6
    @tar Downvotes are very rarely unwarranted. Just because you don't understand why a downvote is cast doesn't mean that there isn't a very good reason for it. – Servy Jul 24 '14 at 14:05
  • Why dont downvotes go with an explanation ? – Saint-Martin Jan 25 '18 at 16:46

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