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A suggested edit I saw had mixed reviews; my decision was to further edit the post. See https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/4624236. This was cited as an example of an edit I should have made differently.

I don't understand why this is a problem, since it is entirely reasonable to edit a suggested edit to improve it further.

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The edit is close to a full re-write of the entire solution. That is not what suggested edits are for. If someone has an entirely different solution to provide they should be providing it through a new answer, not a suggested edit.

Edits are there to improve the presentation of the existing content, not to provide entirely new content or radically change the existing content.

What's worse is that this suggestion had already been made and rolled back before you approved the inappropriate edit for the second time.

Also, your "further editing to incorporate the best of both post versions" involved just removing the @author notation in comments, and nothing else. That's a pretty minuscule change.

I'm glad that you were review banned for this obviously inappropriate reviewing, and hope the other users who approved these repeated inappropriate edits were as well.

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  • Is that what it says? It isn't clear. It looked to me like the post was approved and the rest showed review history. "Edit" should also fall within the realm of "reject" if the change has some merits but otherwise needs to be rolled back. – La-comadreja Apr 23 '14 at 19:36
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    @La-comadreja When "improving" a suggested edit you can either check or uncheck the "this post was helpful" checkbox. If it's checked, you approved it, if it's unchecked, you've rejected it. You checked it. On top of that, the edit was still highly inappropriate, even after your completely minor "edit" to it, so you were still supporting an inappropriate edit, even if you had technically rejected it. – Servy Apr 23 '14 at 19:41
  • I'm new to reviewing and would appreciate a hands-on SO training module for first-time reviewers, teaching us about categories of acceptable and unacceptable answers. I've also noticed that "off-topic" flags don't mention sites like CodeReview and I wonder why, and what there is to do about questions like that. – La-comadreja Apr 23 '14 at 19:48
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    @La-comadreja Why are you reviewing posts at all if you have no idea of what is or is not appropriate? Clearly you should spend at least some time trying to figure that out before you go review. Why wait until you have reviewed over 300 edits to say that you don't know how to review edits and ask for what the guidelines are. Frankly I'm highly disappointed in the system that it's taken you this long to get review banned. Clearly it failed at stopping you in a reasonable period of time. – Servy Apr 23 '14 at 19:53
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    @La-comadreja A very brief history about migration: We suck at it. (i.e. I don't want this crap on my site, here, you take it) So much so that it's limited to those site we actually don't suck at too massively. Beta sites (which CR still is) are never migration targets. – Bart Apr 23 '14 at 19:56

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