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What is the reason behind waiting for 48 hours to be able to offer a bounty for your question?

Sometimes you could face a critical problem which needs a solution right away. Suppose you have the following scenario:

You have scratched your head for days/weeks, and the deadline is today, so you decide to ask for help. The problem is tough and time is needed to write a full answer. There could be people out there who knows the solution, but in their mind perhaps for 25 reps it is not worth the hustle.

To fire those people up, bounty is a good thing. But unfortunately you have to wait 48 hours.

I just wanted to know if there are solid reasons behind it.

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  • 20
    It's to encourage you to learn better time management skills.
    – BoltClock
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:25
  • 17
    doesn't really answer my question. But I guess if you have a diamond, people will upvote nevertheless.
    – Lazy Ninja
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:42
  • 11
    Well duh - it's a comment. But seriously, if you had managed your time better and thought to ask your question earlier - because there's absolutely nothing wrong with asking a question any time - you wouldn't be seeing the 48 hours as a barrier.
    – BoltClock
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:44
  • 4
    meta.stackexchange.com/a/3333/165773
    – gnat
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:44
  • 4
    @gnat, thank you for finding this for me.
    – Lazy Ninja
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:46
  • 8
    @BoltClock Sometimes you could think you are on track and realize a major flaw too late. Even the top managers are not immune to this. Anyway, I was just putting forth a scenario for better understanding. And of course it is a comment. I have been around SO so long to miss that.
    – Lazy Ninja
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:52
  • 9
    @BoltClock while your point is valid, often you only find what the question is once time is already short. You might be digging around for some time before understanding fully what you need to ask.
    – Mr. Boy
    Commented May 26, 2014 at 23:50
  • 11
    Maybe the bounty delay could be changed to 24 hours? Most people (even programmers) bathe and sleep once during a 24 hour period, which gives time for shower thoughts.
    – EricP
    Commented Jan 31, 2015 at 15:37
  • 6
    Completely agree with this question, sometimes a programmer might have a urgent problem and why force them wait 48 hours to solicit more attention to their question? Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 16:26
  • 4
    @BoltClock What does time management have to do with the question? It should be possible to offer a bounty whenever because sometimes circumstances are unforseeable.
    – 10 Rep
    Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:24
  • @BoltClock Not all variables in life are controllable. So even people with the best time management can come into situations where limited time is a big issue.
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:48

3 Answers 3

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The reason you have to wait 48 hours to place a bounty is to give the community time to answer the question normally. A bounty changes the way things normally work, and can mess up the normal flow question/answering. This is good if a question isn't getting a proper answer, but it is better to wait and give the system time to do its work.

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  • 20
    What about the times you know the question does not have a simple answer and will require a detailed answer to be useful - possibly including non-trivial code and so on - and are pretty sure nobody is going to provide that without additional incentive? I've posted questions like that and been proved right... C++ questions get people loving to answer put "how do I do X with niche technology Y" rarely attract such enthusiasm :)
    – Mr. Boy
    Commented May 26, 2014 at 23:54
  • 9
    @John And what about times when you want to get an answer fast and you're having no problem to "pay" for it? An answer in three days may be simply too late.
    – maaartinus
    Commented Jun 5, 2014 at 5:10
  • Well then we get into the whole "I want to offer money bounties" issue which has been discussed many times...
    – Mr. Boy
    Commented Jun 5, 2014 at 9:32
  • 14
    Really? On a site which, from my experience, is typically always full of experts, answers come through within MINUTES. If something isn't answered within the hour, then I guess it means it's "hard" or requires the extra encouragement. I hate this limit, if it's not answered within the hour, allow a limit. Commented Aug 30, 2014 at 9:40
  • 17
    This answer is super vague. The answer "The reason you have to wait 48 hours to place a bounty is to give the community time to answer the question normally" kind of just re asks the same question. Why must we always preserve "normality", e.g., in the case of a fire we are willing to pay for?
    – Tommy
    Commented Apr 9, 2015 at 18:54
  • 7
    There's another reason than allowing the community to answer normally. It's handling crap the normal way, by not having a bounty interfere with flagging, closing and deleting things not making the (really low) threshold for acceptability. Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 12:17
  • 3
    48 hours does seem a bit excessive. As @MyDaftQuestions pointed out, simple questions get answered (or put on hold, marked as duplicate, etc) very quickly. Why not allow users to sacrifice some rep to speed the process along? Having a waiting period makes sense....but so far I haven't seen a justification for 48hrs over 24, or 12, or 6 or even 1...what is so great about two days? Commented Nov 23, 2016 at 21:50
  • 2
    If it gets shorter, some people will develop the reflex of putting a bounty on everything they ask immediately. It will make the bounty questions list grow considerably. Bounty questions are supposed the be rare compared to normal questions. And it won't be the case anymore if they allow instant bounty. I would go for at least 12 hours. Commented Mar 27, 2017 at 13:27
  • 1
    I get it, 48 hours to preserve normality, most users use the system “normally” and this preserves the behavior they expect. HOWEVER, I have 3k points, have put in my dues, have a question for an issue I ran into Friday, would like for it to at least have some answers by Monday, and now it is Sunday and only 18 people have looked at it. What about allowing users to pay a 500 point fee to waive the 48 hour waiting period? Commented Jul 14, 2019 at 15:54
  • 1
    "but it is better to wait and give the system time to do its work" - But bounty is part of the system. Your answer is invalid. You act like a bounty would not cost anything for the person who pays it. The given scenario by the OP is absolutely reasonable and I think this 2 day rule should be removed, it just led to frustration for so many people who seek for help in stressful situations that involve time pressure. Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 9:12
  • Has this changed? I asked a question 2 days ago, and I have > 50 rep but I don't see an option to add a bounty to a question I'm getting pretty desperate over.
    – djsoteric
    Commented Dec 10, 2019 at 19:30
5

There are no data that I am aware of that suggests that a 48 hour delay (or any other delay, for that matter) is optimal. The statistics at the top of the page on SO (and all other SE sites that I checked) show that the questions with bounties are a minor fraction of all questions. This suggests that removing the delay for all bounties, or for large bounties, or for bounties posted by users with at least X rep, will have little effect on the rest of the questions.

The best way to answer this question is by doing experiments to measure the positive and negative effects of varying the bounty delay. Without the data, this conversation is limited to the exchange of opinions and case studies (with limited N). Possible effects/metrics to measure:

  • Quality of the bountied questions and answers: question score, answer score, top answer score, % questions with accepted answers, % questions with no answers).
  • Percent questions voted to close or flagged (as off topic, as very low quality, for moderator intervention).
  • Number of views per question for non-bountied questions (to measure the degree to which attention is drained from non-bountied questions to bountied ones).

FAQs:

An experiment would take a lot of work and risks introducing bugs. Why do it?

The current system uses a somewhat arbitrary delay of 48 hours for all users. Until these 2 days pass, all questions are considered equal in the sense that answering any of them, the rep per upvote/downvote and accepted answer is the same across all questions. But all questions are not created equal! Some are harder than others and would just sit there for 2 days doing nothing, because of the sheer effort required to answer them.

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  • 1
    "the questions with bounties are a minor fraction of all questions" Isn't that the point? Bountied questions should be rare, or else there's little value to them. Also, we already have a problem with people abusing bounties to keep their question from being closed, and removing the delay would just make that even easier. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:04
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    @JohnMontgomery Yes, but even with your (valid) points, there are still no data... What we need is an experiment. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:13
  • 2
    Consider when you vote whether it is better to have data-driven decisions, or... Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:18
  • 3
    I agree with this answer. People just guess when they say that bounties mess up normal answers. It should be possible to give a bounty like whenever.
    – 10 Rep
    Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:22
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    An experiment would take a lot of work and risks introducing bugs, so you need to provide a compelling argument for why it should be done. I don't see a real problem here except that people want answers faster, which SO doesn't care about. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:35
  • Bounty system should just be removed, along with all rep it ever rewarded
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:36
  • 1
    @KevinB What's the data to support your proposal? Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:38
  • 1
    Open the bountied questions list. Most of them are garbage
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 19:38
  • 1
    Do what experiment? What are the consequences that should be measured? Tweaking the bounty time is just the case, not the study. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 20:04
  • @MisterMiyagi Thank you for your comment! I updated the answer with examples of experiments and metrics. I am basing some of the metrics on the concerns of the commenters above. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 20:36
  • 1
    You still haven't explained why you think this is necessary. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 20:38
  • 2
    "because of the sheer effort required to answer them." often stemming from the OP's inability to break their problem apart so they can realize it's just another dupe.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 20:57
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    I don’t see how “hard question” equates to “just sit there”. The hard questions are often those most satisfying to answer. Commented Feb 5, 2021 at 21:14
  • 1
    "There is no data <...> that suggests that a 48 hour delay is optimal." Nor is there any data to suggest it's suboptimal. What is your point here? You post an answer to an old question, basically saying "there is no data". Yes... and....?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Feb 6, 2021 at 19:09
  • 1
    @Cerbrus ...And I suggest to do experiments to get the data and to base policies on the data, not on opinions and case studies with low N. Commented Feb 6, 2021 at 19:51
-3

The answers so far do not consider that sometimes bounties are not given to get an answer fast but to give more credit to a given answer.

I have the situation that I appreciate an answer so much that I would like to give it points and attention with a bounty. But I can't do so because of this 48 hours rule. The 48 hours arguments as stated in the other answer/ comments do not apply here. On the other hand, it is just additional work for me to give the answer the credit it deserves (wait 48 hours, remember to log in, go to question, ...).

Another argument for 48 hours is that people could use it in order to save their poor questions from being deleted. But bounties no longer being a preventative measure for closure.

Further, as pointed out by @TimurShtatland there is no real evidence for the need to wait 48 hours at all.

To sum this up, I argue that people should be free to apply the bounty at any time. As described in the question by Lazy Ninja, doing so is potentially a big help for many people experiencing time issues.

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  • While this is certainly a use for bounties, it's not the intended use. Bounties are meant to be a form of... paid ad, except you're paying with rep rather than money. It wouldn't make much sense to be able to pay for such an ad on day one of a question existing, given it's already on the front page.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:49
  • 1
    @KevinB "Can I award a bounty to an old answer? Yes, you can award your bounty to any answer on the question. This makes it possible for users to reward particularly good answers with more rep than a standard upvote would provide." states this answer with 423 upvotes: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/16065/…
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:53
  • I'm well aware exceptions and features were put in place to placate the more abusive use of bounties
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:54
  • ... Also: I did not only provide a situation where the 48 hour arguments do not apply, but I also invalidate the arguments in general.
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:54
  • That's a FAQ, not a policy discussion.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:57
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    @KevinB Seems not that abusive to me considering how accepted the cited answer is in the community. And you even can choose the option to reward an existing answer as shown in that answer. So it is an intended way of using bounties
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:58
  • Yes, these features were added to bounties because people were abusing bounties in this way at a rate where it didn't make sense to fight the tide.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 20:59
  • I don't think this completely invalidates the logic of having to wait some time in order to allow the question to be answered normally. You might, for example, receive a better answer later, and wish to award the bounty to that instead. It could, theoretically, incentivize users to take the time to answer properly, knowing that a bonus reward can't be given for at least 48h after asking. Whether these advantages outweigh the disadvantages is not clear, but it's still theoretically valid logic.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:00
  • @KevinB Meaning that at this time point it has apparently become one of the use cases.
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:00
  • I would argue most askers do not in fact have a good grasp on whether or not a given answer is "good", given they need an answer in the first place. There's a reason the accepted answer is no longer pinned to the top of the answer list.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:06
  • @KevinB I am glad that you trust so much in the community. But as you know not only the OP can start a bounty but also any other user of the community. But they will also be stoped by the 48 hours rule and would have to actually save the link of the answer and come back two days later. I see little benefit of this
    – LulY
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:10
  • I similarly see little benefit in immediately creating and rewarding a bounty within the first 48 hours, :shrug: as the OP you already can give them 25 rep right away. What benefit does this provide to the community, or how does it assist in building a library of useful questions and answers? Placing a bounty that lasts for 7 days arguably does provide at least some benefit (and is likely to even result in your target user receiving even more rep than your bounty would provide)
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:12
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    It should probably be noted that if you want any sort of change to occur, answering a question about "Why is X done?" with "Actually the reasons for doing X are not very good." is pretty unlikely to result in that change, both because it doesn't really answer the question (the reasoning being bad does not make it not the reasoning) and because the mechanisms for requesting changes/improvements are centered around questions on meta. Even if this were immediately upvoted to +100 and everyone agreed it was a good, important change, we'd have no way of escalating it to staff as an answer.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:26
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    what i believe was the primary reason for the restriction was made moot roughly a week ago, btw. it's prominently displayed in the list here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/401060/…
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:35
  • 1
    (i'm hinting that all you need to do is open a feature request. i'm practically writing it for you)
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:37

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