4 followed Cerberus edit of the question
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I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you can either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you can either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you can either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

3 added 1 character in body
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I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you cacan either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you ca either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you can either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

2 added 417 characters in body
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I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you ca either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

I'm one of the close voters of that SO question.

I call myself a software architect with 30 years of experience and I'm a tad older then you are. I have worked with FoxPro 2.6 and VFP3.0, SQL Server (6.5 onwards) as well as C# since it came to market.

Your question doesn't present a practical programming problem. At best it tries to envision and invite members to offer an equivalent for a proprietary technology that was more geared to database files then to in memory collections.

That simply is either too broad or asking for an off-site resource.

It could have been useful if the question included a specific use case where your current approach doesn't meet your requirements. The lack of such practical use case makes the question in that state it was in when under review, too broad.

The answer you accepted on that question might have helped you but it does nothing for what you actually asked. Either the context you provided doesn't matter or you needed to solve a different problem you didn't mention in your question.

Do know there exists a vibrant community on Stack Exchange called Retro Computing where you ca either find or ask background stories on "long" forgotten technologies. Maybe the question, with a bit of retro-fitting, could fly there, so you have extra information you could have used for the development task you faced and wanted to ask on Stack Overflow.

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