4 deleted 8 characters in body
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I was talking to a kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if he had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing him very well (he's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." He didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame him.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to a kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if he had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing him very well (he's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." He didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame him.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to a kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if he had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing him very well (he's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." He didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame him.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

3 Rollback to Revision 1
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I was talking to someonea kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if theyhe had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that they arehe is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing themhim very well (they'she's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." TheyHe didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame themhim.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to someone the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if they had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that they are a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing them very well (they's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." They didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame them.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to a kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if he had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing him very well (he's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." He didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame him.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

2 added 13 characters in body
source | link

I was talking to a kidsomeone the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if hethey had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he isthey are a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing himthem very well (he'sthey's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." HeThey didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame himthem.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to a kid the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if he had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that he is a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing him very well (he's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." He didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame him.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

I was talking to someone the other day who had a Python issue. Not being well-versed (or really, even badly-versed) in Python, I asked if they had checked Stack Overflow.

Let's just say that they are a "dissatisfied former user". The sanitized version is that "Stack Overflow is the worst forum I ever tried to use". Not knowing them very well (they's one of my son's classmates), I decided to "fly the flag" a little bit, and see if I could get some useful feedback for when I answer questions. I pointed out that Stack Overflow isn't a forum, it's a Q&A site. It's primarily meant to be searched. You're only supposed to ask a question if you can't find the answer.

After getting past a fair bit of rationalization, I got him to boil it down to

  1. Searching is too hard/slow
  2. If it's not a forum, why does it act like one?

Well, I consider the first issue to be dismissible on its face. Not even gonna go there. The problem is, I need better artillery for the second issue, because I don't think I was very persuasive on that one.

The Stack Overflow community is probably the most seriously engaged online community I've ever encountered. When users ask a question, they expect a quick response, because that's what they usually get. When someone asks a question, we expect them to be ready to hand (at least for a little while) to respond to comments asking for clarification. We've all seen a number of questions resolved in rather lengthy comment threads, rather than with posted answers.

I confess, the best I could do with this point was to say that "Well, it may resemble a forum in some respects, but it's really not." They didn't really buy that one, and I can't say that I blame them.

How can I better respond on point to this objection?

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