crop image to make it harder for people to find "the specific people involved"; remove comment that people can find the incident in OP's posting history (no need to give any hints)
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Joshua Ulrich
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Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.


Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let usPlease do not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.

Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.


Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.

Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.


Note: Please do not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.

Postscript at the end makes for easier reading, IMO
Source Link
halfer
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Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.


Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.


Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.

Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.


Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.

Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.


Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.

Used the official names of sites - see section "Proper Use of the Stack Exchange Name" in http://stackoverflow.com/legal/trademark-guidance (the last section).
Source Link
Peter Mortensen
  • 29.4k
  • 4
  • 19
  • 14

Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. II do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'mI'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.


Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). II received several useful answers. II amended one with extra infoinformation and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. SinceSince I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. TryingTrying to be a good citizen of StackOverflowStack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. II tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on StackOverflowStack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another StackeExchangeStack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner friendly-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: IsIs the culture of StackOverflowStack Overflow different from smaller SEStack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? WhatWhat would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other SEStack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? ThatThat usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. ButBut it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.

Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.


Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra info and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of StackOverflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on StackOverflow much any more, but I am quite active on another StackeExchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of StackOverflow different from smaller SE sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other SE sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.

Note: While anyone can look up the incident in my posting history, please try to avoid that. Let us not focus on the specific people involved and keep all comments polite and respectful. I do not want this meta post to result in any changes to the QA I'm asking about---I already received good answer. I'm simply looking for community feedback in case similar situations arise in the future.


Today I posted a mostly well received question (currently at +12). I received several useful answers. I amended one with extra information and its poster received it well.

Another good answer (by a very high rep experienced user) recommended a package to solve the problem. Since I'm new to the area and the package was in source code form, I didn't know how to install it, and it took me a while to figure it out. Trying to be a good citizen of Stack Overflow, and wanting to spare this effort for others, I went back and amended the answer with the four lines of code that make it a full, self-contained solution recipe.

At this point the poster of the answer got upset that I modified his answer, reacted in a negative and hostile way, and removed the edit. I tried to explain why adding this information is useful for the community and added it again (in retrospect, I should not have made the edit the second time), but he reacted in an even more negative manner and removed it again.

I do not participate on Stack Overflow much any more, but I am quite active on another Stack Exchange site where the sort of edit I made is encouraged, and we generally prefer answers that are beginner-friendly and contain the full information needed for a solution.

Question: Is the culture of Stack Overflow different from smaller Stack Exchange sites in this regard and is it considered bad manners to make such edits to others' posts? What would have been the preferred course of action in this situation?

Consider that:

  • I did not edit the original text of the answer, only added to it
  • The additions were concise, relevant, and would have saved time for someone in the future.

Generally, the principle I follow on other Stack Exchange sites when editing questions and answers for the long term is: in what form should we put this QA so it's going to be of use to future visitors arriving from search engines? That usually means making the question clear, concise and reasonably general, and making the answer again clear, concise, and as complete as possible.

In the meantime my question received a number of downvotes which may or may not be related. I also asked for moderator assistance which resulted in the removal of comments, which is probably a good thing. But it also means that I can't gauge the general feeling of the community on the matter, which is why I am asking about it on meta.

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Szabolcs
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  • 12
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