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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 77 votes cast
Mar
3
comment Why was my edit unanimously rejected?
Please don’t let this incidence discourage you. Even if this edit was (apparently correctly?) rejected, your edit was actually really good: you made a concise change that could well have corrected an error in the answer, and you explained your change well in the edit summary. This is in fact one of the better edits I’ve seen.
Feb
18
comment The search engine seems to encourage adding language tags to titles
@epascarello “proper search” would be whatever’s intuitive and not obviously wrong. It’s the engine’s job to deliver useful results, not the user’s job to conform to entirely arbitrary technical restrictions.
Feb
18
comment The search engine seems to encourage adding language tags to titles
Yakk is right, everybody else is wrong. Accusing him of “complicating search even more” is hilariously off the mark: Yakk’s suggestion makes the search engine implementation more complicated, but searching itself easier. That’s exactly what computers should do: automate our work. This answer and the comments are essentially saying, to OP, “you’re using search wrong”. That’s a terrible response. Fix the search, not the user.
Feb
9
comment What to do with comments “This isn't C++” and re-tagging
@immibis Sure. I wasn’t really looking for (counter-)examples though: I know they exist. I’m saying that, contrary to your claim, tagging such questions as [c] and [c++] isn’t generally seen as controversial. It’s only “controversial” on questions where such tagging actually makes no sense.
Feb
9
comment What to do with comments “This isn't C++” and re-tagging
@immibis Not really that controversial. But it affects very few questions: most are specific to either language (if we want to encourage good code in answers, which was Stack Overflow’s goal last I looked). Hence the insistence. Incidentally, this also impacts the question here.
Jan
29
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
28
awarded  Pundit
Jan
28
comment Why are there so many non-programming questions on Stack Overflow?
@Jongware I’m not sure this is the kind of question OP had in mind: it’s already deleted, and there was never any chance of it staying on. Which is my point exactly: Stack Overflow is already policed (zealously!) for off topic questions. Since OP didn’t give any examples we’re arguing a bit in the void here but I suspect that most questions OP dislikes are actually perfectly on topic and should remain here.
Jan
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
27
revised Why are there so many non-programming questions on Stack Overflow?
added 302 characters in body
Jan
27
comment Why are there so many non-programming questions on Stack Overflow?
@Deduplicator Yes, and I think this is a pretty good criterion (although “unique” is also debatable — in principle, for instance, we can use Git for non-programming things; in practice, it’s mainly used for programming). I’ve added this to my answer.
Jan
27
answered Why are there so many non-programming questions on Stack Overflow?
Jan
26
comment Developer survey: how many pennies were there?
Was the number of paper coin rolls a red herring or an accurate proxy? That’s what I used to guess the number (but I don’t remember my estimate, or whether it was close to the correct number).
Jan
17
comment Slashdot has the attribution story wrong
Oh my god, reading this or the reddit discussion is just awkward and painful.
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
12
accepted New notification for old comment
Jan
12
comment New notification for old comment
Great detective work.
Jan
12
revised New notification for old comment
deleted 57 characters in body
Jan
12
asked New notification for old comment
Nov
26
awarded  Curious