10,315 reputation
22537
bio website taking1and1.wordpress.com
location Downtown Burbank
age 41
visits member for 6 years, 7 months
seen 32 mins ago

Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com. Alternatively, I maintain an office on chat. (Please ignore the meta cruft.)

You can read about what I've done over the years in my curriculum vitae.

On a personal note, I'm married and have three children. Our oldest son loves school, friends, games, and reading. (He can't wait to get on our LEGO® Answers site, but he's not quite old enough. My posts there are usually at his request.) Two of my children happen to have been born on the same day. I sometimes write about that experience.

Don't have time for a full review of something? Why not try my 5-second reviews?

Occasionally, I write a post for Eschewmenical.


22h
comment People cheating on Stack Egg?
Please see: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/252393/…
1d
comment Is StackEgg causing me problems, or something else?
@DonkeyKong: Hmmm... I'm afraid I don't know anything about WebMarshal. If you can configure it to block specific URLs, you might try blocking the Stack Egg static content and JavaScript.
1d
comment Is StackEgg causing me problems, or something else?
@DonkeyKong: If you are still having problems, you can turn off Stack Egg, which should get you productive again.
Mar
20
comment Will my own deleted, non-closed, flagged `useful`posts be completely un-associated from my Stack Overflow account?
For what it's worth, it's fine to let people know they can contact us directly. It's true we are busy (very busy in fact), but this the sort of thing we are empowered to do. Plus, I asked for this, so I might as well take my part in reaping the consiquences. ;-) That said, we'd probably say what you said: deletion ought to be sufficient.
Mar
18
comment Is using Stack Overflow for gimme codez questions encouraged?
The 30 and 365 day criteria for autodeletion do not require the question to be closed. It turns out the there are currently twice as many deleted questions as closed questions and the vast majority of deletions are automated.
Mar
13
comment Can't edit question - title already exists
@BillWoodger: My WAG is that when asking only exact matches are detected and when editing punctuation is stripped. But that's without looking at the code. Ideally both scenarios would use the same check.
Mar
13
comment Can't edit question - title already exists
@ChrisF: The mobile apps weren't involved in this particular question. I don't know what happened here, but there are certainly plenty of duplicates out there. It seems like the right approach is to either close this question as a duplicate (and not bother editing) or fix the title to show what makes this particular question unique. (It looks like the OP tried to do just that in an edit.) Looking in the database, I don't see another question with the original title. Two old questions lack the final period however. Not sure what's up with that.
Feb
27
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
There are actually two different types of readers. The type you are talking about go to the site every day and maybe vote. There are almost certainly more of this sort than most of us suspect. But there aren't nearly as many of those readers as there are readers who arrive via Google (and other search engines, I guess). I'm not sure how big an impact specialized sites and ambiguous reputation has on those users. I hadn't thought of site splits as a possible consequence of closing. I'm curious if we can find some evidence for the theory . . .
Feb
26
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
So the funny thing about the How can I get rid of this keyword in local functions? Even after it was reopened (likely as a result of the blog post), it hasn't gotten any more answers. I suspect that's because the answer that came in before the question was closed was about as good as one could hope for. There are a lot of things I liked about that post, but the examples of "bad closures" are not ideal in my opinion. Closure signals community consensus even when people disagree. In other words, we can't even agree on the 1% that's wrong.
Feb
24
comment Remove the limitation that stops comments from starting with +1 or -1
@Seth: That's a completely fair response, actually. One of the things I did while writing this answer was to see how often I post +1 comments across the network. I didn't think I would find many, but there were 144 such comments. 41 of those begin with +1. So if this ban had happened several years ago, I'd have run into it plenty of times and be as frustrated as you are. Truth is, we are going to continue having problems with comments until some comment aging system gets built in. (And even then, I don't think everyone will be happy.)
Feb
20
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@FamousBlueRaincoat: Sadly, that's not the case. Their questions are very often answered. But they: 1) don't understand the answer, 2) have follow-up questions they left in the comments, 3) are now question banned, 4) think their boss/co-workers will think less of them, 5) are simply offended by the -1 next to their question, or 6) a combination of the above. People hate being downvoted even when it doesn't matter.
Feb
20
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@Gilles: Look at the first graph. These are all questions that are eventually closed, but there are so many answers in the first five minutes that closed questions get (on average) 75% of the answers that all questions do. Would you use a killfile system that showed you 75% of a user's posts? (This is skewed by the dual-use of closures. When I throw out the outliers, the rate will be lower.) The closing system promises certain things that I do not believe it delivers.
Feb
20
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
Stack Overflow different than Usenet for reasons other than just closed questions. As a reader (most of whom find questions via search), what matters is not whether the question is closed (or even remotely ontopic), but whether the answer is correct and actionable. The data I presented in the question suggests that questions are closed after the majority of answers are in. Even after the "on hold" close changes, most closed questions are never improved. What I'm questioning is not the goals of closing, but whether closing achieves those goals.
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@MichaelT: I don't know about you, but I don't often find those questions via Google. More often, I get results of mediocre questions that were closed for reasons that have nothing to do with whether the answers helped me. For instance, on Nov. 6, 2014 I was looking for a Unicode arrow. (Don't ask me why; I can't recall.) One of several SO results was: HTML unicode character for a “tall” right chevron? As someone trying to find a bit of information, I didn't care whether the question was closed.
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
I think there's some revisionist history in this answer. Sure there was a lot of "fluff" in the beta. But we really didn't know what we were doing. I asked a lot of fluff questions back then and the usual response I got was, "hey, why isn't this CW?" My questions weren't closed until years later. And at that point, I'd learned for myself that GTKY questions don't produce the results I was hoping for. Closing had roughly zero impact on my behaviour. As far as I can tell, there's no data showing that closing is the primary reason for quality questions.
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
It's not uncommon for people to use the contact form to complain that their question was rejected. When we investigate, occasionally we discover that the question is open, has a useful answer and some helpful comments, but also has a single downvote. I think it's difficult to overstate how effective downvotes are in communicating that something is wrong. We also see situations where not getting an answer results in the asker posting a duplicate of their original question. (This is true whether or not the original is closed.)
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
The most striking discovery I made is that if we frame the problem as a race between question closers and question answerers (in essence, the graph) answerers are winning. If the goal is to prevent people from getting answers (and that's a strange goal in my opinion), closing fails to do the job. Thanks to the rolling rate limit, downvoting is more efficient. Unfortunately, once a question is closed, it tends to stay that way. Not even a heroic edit is sufficient. [citation needed]
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@Louis: It's not just less popular tags. A little under half of currently undeleted questions have a score of 0. The distribution suggests -1 would be a better place to start. There would have to be a separate solution to the "programmer cartoon" problem.
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@MichaelT: That's an excellent suggestion. You can see some of the effect of removing outliers by pulling out "late closes" as I did. But your method would also allow us to remove outliers on open questions. The more I think about it, the less helpful it seems to talk about the same dozen or so really popular closed questions. In the grand scheme of things, those don't matter. What matters is the thousands of questions that get a few hundred views. In aggregate, those are what people searching for answers see.
Feb
19
comment Thought experiment: What would happen if we didn't have close votes?
@bluet: One of the issues with the current close system is that it claims to initiate a process in which people get better at asking questions, but the process usually ends right there. People often act as if closing bad questions is a good end in itself. But that's not clear from the data I'm looking at. Closing does not stop most answers and it does not hasten the deletion of terrible questions. I'm thinking about looking at whether it encourages edits and self-improvement next. If closing helps people be better askers and programmers, it would be good to demonstrate that.