9,753 reputation
11319
bio website fivesecondreview.wordpress.co…
location Downtown Burbank
age 40
visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com.

You can read about what I've done over the years in my curriculum vitae.

On a personal note, I'm married and have three children. Our oldest son loves school, friends, games, and reading. (He can't wait to get on our LEGO® Answers site, but he's not quite old enough. My posts there are usually at his request.) Two of my children happen to have been born on the same day. I sometimes write about that experience.

Don't have time for a full review of something? Why not try my 5-second reviews?

Occasionally, I write a post for Eschewmenical.


1d
comment Inquisitive badge is far too easy to obtain
The badge was designed to make question grinding difficult. I think it safe to say that not many people will ask 500+ questions in order to get a silver badge. It's also clear that the badges did not motivate the questions in this case, since the user didn't know the badge would exist when they asked most of their questions. So while we didn't eliminate every edge case, we made it a lot harder to get silver or gold than just asking a lot of questions.
Jul
17
comment How do you report an underage user to Stack Exchange?
It's important to note that our minimum required age is a direct consequence of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).
Jul
9
comment Is “Sparrows and Owls” a useful model of answering behavior?
@Bruno: I clarified that section a bit. The top answer becomes worth more as each additional competing answer is added by this system. Which is odd.
Jul
9
comment Is “Sparrows and Owls” a useful model of answering behavior?
@Bruno: You read that correctly. One of the reasons I posted here and emailed the authors is that I'm not sure I read the paper correctly. The way I calculated things seems wrong, but I think matches the equation they used.
Jul
3
comment Should we allow touches of humor in questions/answers?
If you have to explain the joke...
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
@Barmar: There was a delay on SO. Looks like you got it now: stackoverflow.com/help/badges/4127/curious?userid=1491895
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
Until this morning, we were going to break consistency. But we decided at the last minute (almost literally) to take our time on making the change. I'll try to find that feature request...
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
So... what would you think if we multiply awarded those too?
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
@ChrisF: I never got a better suggestion. :-/ Fortunately, that's a copy change we could do at any time in the future.
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
@Joe W: We count questions closed for any reason as closed both for point #1 and #2. The reason is we really are interested in getting interesting questions, which is another way of saying unique. ;-) The direction of the duplicate close matters since better questions tend to be the ones left open.
Jul
2
comment Badges for habitually asking well-received questions
@gnat: I've probably run out of ways to word the criteria because I've repeated them so often. That bit's not changed.
Jul
1
comment Does location influence voting?
@Payeli: Voting on Meta is somewhat more complicated than on main sites. Thanks to many years of confusion, the data here might not help as much as you might hope. More importantly, it's on SO proper that this really matters.
Jul
1
comment Does location influence voting?
@BoltClock: My primary worry is that voting should be essentially fair after problems are taken care of. I'm less sure of that now that I look at individual voting. But I think confirmation bias among those of us who have seen a lot of vote fraud (and you've observed more than I have) might lead us to mistaken conclusions. Looking a bit more deeply, I think there is something to the idea that people from India in particular are being voted on differently than other locations.
Jul
1
comment Does location influence voting?
@Bill the Lizard: Good point. I believe we could compare the location of voter and recipient in the internal database. I won't be able to get to that today, but I'll try to look later in the week.
Jun
13
comment Cannot award bounty to self? No other answers are correct
See also: Lost reputation after answering my own question with bounty
Jun
4
comment Does the broken window theory apply to closing questions?
@Hot Licks: Part of the problem with all of this discussion is that we are talking about a wide variety of people when we say "new users". The sort of people who get banned ask awful questions and tend to stick in memory. But there are other new users who are conscientious and would ask decent questions. Being mean to the former may or may not help. But it certainly discourages the later from even trying. We cut off our noses to spite our own faces.
Jun
4
comment Does the broken window theory apply to closing questions?
@kapa: I can tell you that the people you have in mind do listen to at least one signal: when they are blocked from asking questions, they let us know. Even the automated warning shows promise. I suspect a good deal of frustration regular users have right now is the sorts of signals we traditionally use (closing, commenting, and voting) have far less impact on new users than we wish they had.
Jun
4
comment Does the broken window theory apply to closing questions?
The last full week for which we have data shows 6450 questions closed which is a bit under 1000 a day. But the question is: assuming we closed every bad question as it was asked, would that solve our problem? My guess is no. Closing questions seems to not be a deterrent for the sorts of askers who are most annoying.
Jun
4
comment Does the broken window theory apply to closing questions?
@kapa: I agree that the tools are insufficient. I've been thinking a lot about what Joel proposed on the latest podcast. In particular, downvoting a question doesn't currently reduce the odds it will be seen and answered. All a downvote does functionally is start new users down a path of being blocked from asking. That's a very blunt tool and easily worked around. What is needed is clearer and more direct signals to new users that they are headed down a bad path.
Jun
4
comment Does the broken window theory apply to closing questions?
If you look at my answer, the point is that reluctance to close and downvote questions can't be the cause of more bad questions. My argument is that if you don't have correlation, you can't very well claim causation.