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bio website taking1and1.wordpress.com
location Downtown Burbank
age 40
visits member for 6 years, 2 months
seen 15 hours ago

Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com. Alternatively, I maintain an office on chat. (Please ignore the meta cruft.)

Emacs is a fine operating system in search of a decent editor.


Oct
20
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
@Sumurai8: I do, but I'm rarely logged into it. (Which might be because it's so easy to log out of. I didn't say my test was scientific!)
Oct
20
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
@J.C.Leitão: I did some testing and it seems you are correct. I've edited my answer.
Oct
17
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
While that is a good design principle, it isn't the one we used. (And likely has little to do with how many clicks it takes to open or close questions either.)
Oct
10
comment Cannot login using Yahoo OpenId
I can't reproduce this error. Could you try just typing https://me.yahoo.com/ in the box that says "Or, you can manually enter your OpenId"?
Sep
24
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
To be fair (to myself) I agree that the correct solution is to make sub-communities work on SO and other SE sites. That should have been done several years ago, in my opinion. Our initial discussion about the Emacs proposal was literally whether to tell them to come back in X months and see if the work we are doing to solve the sub-community problem has paid off. We still might do that when the Emacs private beta ends. But that's pretty rough because, as you say, there's a ton of work to be done between now and then. We don't know how long it will take, so we let the Emacs site launch now.
Sep
24
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@CodyGray: Because there is no chance that a C++ site could include a substantial proportion of non programming questions. And we don't know yet whether or not that's true of Emacs either. I anticipate spending a few hours between now and Monday totaling up the number of questions in private beta that could not be asked on SO, because that's what we'll evaluate to see if the site is really expanding the audience. We don't have to do that exercise with C++ or C# because it's obvious those topics would spilt SO's audience with no chance of adding to it. Emacs is an edge case.
Sep
23
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@Cody Gray: It won't. On Area 51, I wrote: "If this had been language split (Ruby, Haskell, Lisp, etc.) we would have shut it down immediately." In addition, C++ doesn't have a leg to stand on, statistically speaking. It's the very definition of "well-served by SO". (I'm fairly down on Vi/Vim, by the way.)
Sep
23
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@AirThomas: That's one of the advantages of using median rather than average: less need to adjust for variables such as time. If you look at the study I linked to at the top of the answer, you'll see evidence that most questions get most of their views within a week or two of asking. So while there is a slight bias toward Stack Overflow, it probably isn't significant. You could get close to eliminating the systematic error by limiting questions on SO to the life of the corresponding site.
Sep
23
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@gunr2171: Yeah. The trouble with using those sites is that there's no clear tag to compare them to, so it's a little harder to figure what impact those splits really had. I think it fair to say both topics were never really welcome (tolerated at best) on SO.
Aug
29
comment Volunteer to help mentor one of 16 new graduates starting a career in programming
@tmyklebu: I'm with you on that. But changing a community (especially when a course correction, not a revolution, is needed) turns out to be way harder than creating new features or starting new initiatives. The concern that this question was somehow off-topic (or spam!) speaks volumes to me. The good news, however, is that productive conversations still occur (and will continue to be started by me and others) on this meta site. Our strange mix of meritocracy and democracy may very well produce positive results if we are patient and persistent.
Aug
29
comment Volunteer to help mentor one of 16 new graduates starting a career in programming
@jwenting: Please see my updated answer. I would also encourage you to read the whole of MLK's letter from jail. It's easy to get sidetracked while doing good by plans to do better. You gotta start somewhere.
Aug
20
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@l4mpi: My point isn't that we should let the feelings of people override our commitment to quality. My point is that when you see a fire it tends to be smarter to reach for a fire extinguisher, rather than an accelerant. To say that we must either focus on quality or take feelings into account is an example of the black and white fallacy. In most cases downvoting is constructive since it sends the signal that something is wrong. But in a few cases, it's just mob mentality.
Aug
20
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@Cody Gray: That's a very binary way to look at the question. If the proposal has merit it's because whatever we hope downvotes communicate, they feel like a punishment to a recipient. When people come to meta to ask for help, it's no longer helpful to downvote them. (Or at least it's not constructive until there has been enough time to fix the problem.) If meta can be a place where people can learn to use the main site better, we ought to be careful not to incite more anger than necessary.
Aug
20
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@MichaelT: Not only have I talked with moderators of small sites (and larger ones, like The Workplace, who worry about hot questions), I was a moderator on a small site. I'd happily trade a handful of posts that get disproportionate voting for the opportunity to reach many thousands of potential users. I take that back: I want the lucky authors of hot questions and answers to get their reputation paydays. Blocking voting would be like limiting the prize a lottery winner takes home for the sake of, what? Fairness?
Aug
20
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@MichaelT: It's very unusual for crap questions to gather the necessary upvotes and answer to make the hot questions list. Generally, crap questions get closed and downvoted first. Or to put it another way: voting is the only reliable signal we have of quality. A vote freeze (for any reason) would need to be: a) rare,and b) for posts that have a strong likelihood of being edited. Freezing hot questions fails these criteria.
Aug
20
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@MichaelT: I don't see that as a comparable problem. In the case of a question raised on meta, the assumption is that the question (or occasionally, answer) needs fixing. If a question is noticed by the "hot question" algorithm, it generally is because the community has found something worth looking at. In fact, it's impossible for a question to get on the list without upvotes, answers, and answer upvotes. All of those things happen before a question hits the network.
Aug
19
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
@FishBelowtheIce: I happen to know this is also a concern on smaller sites. The difference is that people on small sites who read meta are also likely to have read the post on main. It's the difference between posting a restaurant review in a small town paper (where it just tells people what they already know) compared to a big city paper (where it might bring in a few extra customers).
Aug
19
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
The beauty of an automated system is that it requires no human intervention. If we create a new voting freeze status, moderators could remove it if needed. So the difference between a flag proposal and the original is a what the default action is. (That and a human would need to make yet another decision if we use a flag.) I think we could probably design a system that would require no human intervention except in exceptional cases. If we can, we should prefer it to a more manual process.
Aug
19
comment Why was my question about a specific programming task that strictly follows the “How to ask” guidance downvoted?
@Joiner: Your English is pretty good to my reading. I'm using "the book" as an idiom. I mean you did all the things we recommend. As for footnote 3: using bold for emphasis can sometimes seem like shouting would in real life. It's purpose is to make sure people are paying attention. So when you bolded "generic" is sounds like you assume the answerer didn't read the question. The second comment reemphasized the Listen up! tone. I'd go easy on the bold if you don't want to seem bold.;)
Aug
19
comment Impose a 24 hour voting freeze on questions being discussed on Meta
In practice, this will make little to no difference while increasing the complexity of the feature. On SO, organic voting on questions is somewhat rare. Besides, if a user decides to ask on meta and we grant a reprieve from downvotes there, why wouldn't we also give them a break from organic votes?