9,966 reputation
21829
bio website taking1and1.wordpress.com
location Downtown Burbank
age 40
visits member for 6 years, 2 months
seen 20 hours ago

Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com. Alternatively, I maintain an office on chat. (Please ignore the meta cruft.)

Emacs is a fine operating system in search of a decent editor.


2d
awarded  Revival
Oct
20
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
@Sumurai8: I do, but I'm rarely logged into it. (Which might be because it's so easy to log out of. I didn't say my test was scientific!)
Oct
20
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
@J.C.Leitão: I did some testing and it seems you are correct. I've edited my answer.
Oct
20
revised Why is the logout button hidden?
I guess I was wrong about how log in worked. My incognito testing on a dummy account shows it does indeed log one out of just the current site.
Oct
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
17
revised Why is the logout button hidden?
Wow. That first line was _confusing_.
Oct
17
comment Why is the logout button hidden?
While that is a good design principle, it isn't the one we used. (And likely has little to do with how many clicks it takes to open or close questions either.)
Oct
17
answered Why is the logout button hidden?
Oct
10
comment Cannot login using Yahoo OpenId
I can't reproduce this error. Could you try just typing https://me.yahoo.com/ in the box that says "Or, you can manually enter your OpenId"?
Sep
29
revised Does it pay to spin off sites?
Tone. Ugh.
Sep
26
awarded  Good Question
Sep
26
answered Is there a way to edit a “mostly code” question?
Sep
24
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
To be fair (to myself) I agree that the correct solution is to make sub-communities work on SO and other SE sites. That should have been done several years ago, in my opinion. Our initial discussion about the Emacs proposal was literally whether to tell them to come back in X months and see if the work we are doing to solve the sub-community problem has paid off. We still might do that when the Emacs private beta ends. But that's pretty rough because, as you say, there's a ton of work to be done between now and then. We don't know how long it will take, so we let the Emacs site launch now.
Sep
24
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@CodyGray: Because there is no chance that a C++ site could include a substantial proportion of non programming questions. And we don't know yet whether or not that's true of Emacs either. I anticipate spending a few hours between now and Monday totaling up the number of questions in private beta that could not be asked on SO, because that's what we'll evaluate to see if the site is really expanding the audience. We don't have to do that exercise with C++ or C# because it's obvious those topics would spilt SO's audience with no chance of adding to it. Emacs is an edge case.
Sep
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
awarded  Curious
Sep
23
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@Cody Gray: It won't. On Area 51, I wrote: "If this had been language split (Ruby, Haskell, Lisp, etc.) we would have shut it down immediately." In addition, C++ doesn't have a leg to stand on, statistically speaking. It's the very definition of "well-served by SO". (I'm fairly down on Vi/Vim, by the way.)
Sep
23
comment Does it pay to spin off sites?
@AirThomas: That's one of the advantages of using median rather than average: less need to adjust for variables such as time. If you look at the study I linked to at the top of the answer, you'll see evidence that most questions get most of their views within a week or two of asking. So while there is a slight bias toward Stack Overflow, it probably isn't significant. You could get close to eliminating the systematic error by limiting questions on SO to the life of the corresponding site.
Sep
23
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
23
revised Does it pay to spin off sites?
My 6th grade teacher must be appalled.