Reputation
32,961
Next tag badge:
8/100 score
1/20 answers
Badges
3 7
Newest
 Student
Impact
~3k people reached

Sep
21
comment Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
"Having people come to your desk and talk it through is generally better too." Thus the rubber ducky. It works just as well if you have to write it down nicely, and then you can add drawings too - if it's easy to do.
Sep
21
comment Possible Github integration such as code imports?
The general asker's inability to minimize their code is my pet peeve. I completely agree. Most "wall of code" questions minimize by an order of magnitude. Making it easier for people to post walls of code is just wrong. OTOH, I'd like it very much if there was literate programming support for answers that could live on github.
Sep
17
comment Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
Let's recap: Math SE has integrated their lingua franca: expressions, EE has integrated a circuit editor, SE & Programmers should imho integrate a diagram editor. Heck, probably all sites could use diagrams, so this could be site-wide. Taking apart the syntax of a sentence in some language that has its SE site? Use a diagram. Talking of some DIY gizmo? Draw it. And so on. The integration increases the likelihood of visual expression by an order of magnitude or more. IMHO we should be all for such integration.
Sep
17
comment Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
@Clive Whatever argument you have is the argument for not integrating CircuitLab into EE stackexchange, I think. The only benefit of the integration there is that you don't have to copy/upload images manually, and that the schematic is editable. Same would be here. And your argument would also apply to math stackexchange: we can all be copy-pasting screenshots from latex output...
Sep
17
comment Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
@Cerbrus I'm an EE, and I can trivially generate an isomorphic human-readable textual description for any circuit, so by that line of thinking why bother with circuit diagrams either? I mean, I just gave you a counterexample that works for every EE question: they all could do with a textual description only! I lament that the clarity and simplicity of circuit diagrams is absent from software and programming questions and answers. Having an integrated diagramming tool makes things easier, not harder.
Sep
17
comment Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
It's true that you can do without UML. But I think that if we are to encourage judicious use of UML as a lingua franca, barriers to entry are unhelpful. Adoption of UML forces a clearer view of what's going on - whether you talk about class inheritance trees, or state transitions, or interactions. Sometimes just attempting to draw one immediately points out where the problem is. I'm as far from an enterprisey UML-everywhere proponent as it gets, but UML is a very concise and visual way of expressing quite a few things that are much harder to get across in writing, especially with ESL issues.
Sep
17
asked Integrate an online UML/diagram editor such as gliffy
Sep
14
comment Warlords of Documentation: A Proposed Expansion of Stack Overflow
@TigerhawkT3 If a company needs their customers to tell them how to do their jobs, we have a problem much deeper than documentation itself. If good documentation isn't in the culture of a product team, it's never going to happen. Give me a counterexample or two. I dare you.
Sep
13
comment Warlords of Documentation: A Proposed Expansion of Stack Overflow
@TigerhawkT3 "pester the developer for better docs" Let's be real. What would I rather do: pester someone with little guarantee that something good will come out of it, all the while I have to endure broken docs, or fix the docs and move on to better things? Pestering the developers is not going to happen, I don't think. The drive for good documentation must come from within the corporate culture, expecting customer feedback to make it happen is wishful thinking. If good docs aren't considered an essential part of the product, then you get exactly that: not good docs.
Sep
13
comment Warlords of Documentation: A Proposed Expansion of Stack Overflow
I'm trying to explain that the reason there's so much bad documentation [...] Ahh, you're saying we should be paying you more. Well, guess what, some people got more time than money, and not everyone with experience is getting paid well enough to pay you to do the writing. Besides, some of us fix our homes because they enjoy that kind of work, not because we can't afford the contractors. You're trying to keep the documentation writing in your guild. I personally hate that approach to any endeavor.
Aug
30
comment Why I get downvotes instead of answers when I ask a question maximum best I can?
@JonathonReinhart "Stack Overflow does not exist to teach programming?" I think that anyone who understands the philosophy of education would have a big argument about that. SO does not exist to do that, yet that is precisely what it does - because answering questions about programming cannot be detached from teaching in any meaningful way, without completely losing most common sense meaning that people associate with education. SO is a selective school - not all of students' questions will be answered. No shame in that, IMHO. That's what makes it good. Selectivity in this context is good.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
@Servy I guess I'll give it a shot, then, starting with adding a bit to the C++ wiki, and seeing what transpires. None of this is earth-shattering stuff, just a simple list of things to consider (how to massage the code, minimization strategies, if it crashes please post the backtrace, etc.)
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
@Servy You're characterizing the emergent behavior of a complex system, a.k.a. the community, as if it was one person who can rationally convince themselves of something, in an idealized setting. It won't work that way. It doesn't make the community bad as a whole, or its individual members bad, it's just that oftentimes emergent behavior is counterintuitive. Even if all those community members would love it everyone followed a bit more spelled-out process before throwing a very poor question around, I fully expect that they may object.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
"you need to spent quite a lot of time condensing that down to a much more manageable size" Most people can easily digest practical examples. Given that we're talking about throwing code about, even carefully prepared code, it still can't be small even if I put very little verbiage around the code. I mean, I could be as succinct as formatting a big code blob with "DO" and "DON'T" columns. But it seems to defeat the purpose of being easy to understand.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
"What about that makes you think that such information is completely inappropriate in that context then?" Since nobody bothered with expanding it, and C++ isn't exactly an unpopular tag. I fully expect that I'd be told to go to hell for adding such details. So I don't see it happening for reasons other than normal, expected human inertia... Sure, I could give it a try, but do you really think that a tag wiki can have 50%+ of content that gives specific question-asking techniques used to make the code easier for ones to swallow, and to find bugs in?
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
The thing is: some of the tips apply to C++, some to Qt, so I'd like to modify both wikis. I don't see any of such tips being applicable to the C++ wiki, since there'd be likely an outrage about the wiki suddenly being 4x as long, even if I'd keep myself very succinct. That's why I think that outsourcing that stuff to a Q&A has a higher chance of success and of reconciling input from multiple people.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
Literally the only practical guideline in the C++ wiki is "Try to keep the code as minimal as possible while still being able to reproduce the problem; often the problem will be found during the process of creating that sample code." Nothing there on how to leverage the unique properties of C++ to actually accomplish that (merging of translation units, removal of include guards and other junk, java-style implementations-in-class-declarations where it makes things easier to read and smaller, etc.).
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
@Servy Even the main C++ tag has nothing about how to ask good C++ questions in it - it doesn't do anything to concretize the MCVE as it applies to C++. Even though there are plenty of widely accepted community practices as to minimization of C++ examples/test cases, you find none of it in the C++ tag wiki. So I'm almost certain that none of would belong in the Qt wiki as well. Unless you posit that the C++ tag wiki is woefully inadequate, and we're past overdue to add some practical question asking tips to it.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
The whole reason I really wished it belonged somewhere on SO or meta was that I don't want to try to give an impression that I try to funnel a traffic to an off-site resource that's my own, even if it'd be open-source, stand-alone page (not a blog) and not monetized. I don't want to give anyone any ammunition, even if they would be wrong believing I had some ulterior motive other than helping out. I simply want to be 100% above the board. I just find that I'm repeating myself, and that many questions would benefit from the same tricks to make them clearer or more useful to the wider community.
Aug
13
comment Is a subject/tag-specific “how to ask questions” question better on meta or SO?
@Servy Given that my goal is to merely concretize the abstract notion of MCVE as applied to C++/Qt, I wouldn't necessarily call it a personal preference. As long as we consider MCVE to be the goal, there's a bunch of techniques/rules that you have to apply no matter what to reach the minimalized, readable, understandable outcome. As long as the MCVE aspect is not a personal preference, the particular steps you have to apply to reach it can't be one either, if there's literally no other way of reaching it.