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-4

As a new user who had to make posts and get karma before I could post my question, I think down-votes can be used when the question doesn't show enough research into the content the person is asking about. I'm also in agreement that not helpful posts don't get up-votes. I very much so encourage feedback, constructive criticism is how people grow. So I think ...


-9

There is a potential for interaction with "sponsored tags" as a handful of vendors (e.g. Google Chrome) pay SE to host supportive content for various tags. I had the experience, not here but on Server Fault, of posting a Question about a problem with an offsite resource. As StackExchange content goes, it was not the best (one upvote, two downvotes, no ...


12

I have a problem with "what does this syntax mean?" questions in general, because you could come up with near-infinite such questions and they'd never be searchable (and, thus, useful) to anybody else. I don't see their value in a Q&A. But there is obvious value to the posting individual. If the OP can cite their sources and use words to describe some ...


2

I'm pretty new, but I upvote the answers that help me solve my problem, and the question that provoked the answer (or it wouldn't be there), I think that's only fair. I also upvote questions without an answer for my problem if the question itself is relevant to my issue, call it solidarity for a fellow sufferer


26

Errors in tutorials and other learning resources can be very confusing to people trying to learn something new. If they already understood the syntax and everything well enough to know that it was an error in the tutorial, they probably wouldn't be reading the tutorial in the first place. If a tutorial does something in a way different from how you would ...


3

I use to upvote questions I am willing to ask myself: if I am stuck on some problem, go to google, search it; ehi, someone had my same (or similiar) problem here on stackoverflow, let's see how did he solved!


5

Let me repeat @JonClement's comment here, because I totally agree with it and has the main point IMO: Assess voting on the question as though it didn't have any answers. Is it clear, does it provide the necessary information, is it well formatted etc. [...] treat the question as though it was stand-alone. Let me expand on this by going through your ...


0

I understand your concern, but I am afraid I disagree. The reason are both logical and ideological. I will list all reasons. 1) The reasoning is not completely logical. The problem is how you define a good or bad answer and a good or bad question, which may be subjective. Inexperienced users will likely ask fundamental questions. Does this mean that there ...


0

If you want to spend more votes on questions you're genuinely interested in, I suggest you avoid casting too many votes in review queues. Personally, I avoid downvoting and flagging low-quality content at the same time. If you flag 10 really bad questions instead of downvoting them, that will save you 10 votes for other things, and bad questions will ...


3

The only time to worry about just about any cap is if it's so ridiculously high that almost no one ever hits it at all, and you're hitting it routinely. For example, 50 questions every 30 days, rolling. Mod caps, in particular — vote caps, review caps, and so forth — are a) made to be banged up against routinely in the interest of getting the ...


4

As Andy says, hitting the cap is rare. Andy mentioned the close votes limit, but just look at badges: Vox Populi is one of the rarest bronze badges, rarer than many silver badges. Hitting the 40 votes limit requires discipline and it's encouraged because StackExchange wants more votes on questions. Consider it a failure when you hit the limit without ...


1

When you start typing the title for your question a list below the title will be automatically populated: Of course there is no guarantee that the list is complete, your question can still be a duplicate of a question that doesn't appear in the list. But the list is a good start - especially when you combine it with the related questions list on the right ...


-3

Have not do what you were told before you got there? Sometimes the ask makes you understand the best of , it is because duplocate makes downvotes. Make sure you've searched the SO sight and archives thoroughly before posting! Lots of questions have been asked answered and already


1

Reading http://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask is the first essential step in avoiding downvotes. Well written, documented and complete questions normally don't get downvotes even if they are common/duplicates.


9

Although I understand the point David made, I think his solution is a bit too radical and will discourage new users from participating (as was already extensively put forward in several other answers). Another possibility is a more gradual increase in upvoting rights. For example: 1 upvote per day with 15/25 rep, 5 per day by 100 rep, 10 by 250, from 500 ...


3

After five minutes of casting a vote on an answer or question, the vote gets locked. It will remain locked until the question/answer gets edited. My assumption on this is that if votes don't get locked, you could un-vote old votes in questions/answers and people would see a lot of reputation drops. The vote gets unlocked upon editing the answer/question ...


10

While I understand your concern, I think changing the minimum rep requirement would, as said in other answers, cause more problems than it solves. It would very likely offer a disincentive to answering questions from new users and further the level of frustration experienced by new users. I would suggest that exposing up/downvote totals at a lower threshold ...


22

Is this really an issue? I am yet to be convinced that this is an issue. Low quality answers can be usurped by a superior answer, down-voted and flagged for removal for incredibly poor ones. A quick analysis shows that 88% of upvotes and 91% of downvotes are owned by users that now meet the revised criteria's implied reputation threshold (150). Should ...


78

I don't think this is a very high requirement I emphatically disagree. 15 upvotes are the equivalent of 150 reputation. That's non-trivial for new users. More importantly, you are making it harder for users to even get those first 15 upvotes in the first place. If it takes 15 upvotes for one user to vote, each of those 15 upvoters also need 15 ...


-26

I think the current upvote/downvote system is OK, but we can add some new matrix. The power of an upvote/downvote would depend upon the person's reputation points. For example, the upvote of a person having 1000 reputation will matter more than a person having 50 reputation. Similar is the case with downvote also. This way we can give everyone a right of ...


26

I'm against this proposal, not because I don't agree that there is a problem, but because I think it won't have much of an effect, and has several downsides (see user000001's answer). You have observed low-quality answers being upvoted, and immediately jumped to the conclusion without evidence that it is low-rep users (meaning users in the range between the ...


126

I have to disagree. My impression of the voting system is that it is designed to increase engagement with the site, even by very casual users. It's part of what distinguishes Stack Overflow (and Stack Exchange as a whole) from a web forum. Somewhat autobiographically, I think of it is this way: I'm mainly active on three Stack Exchange sites ...


21

it seems like only low rep users upvote, while all the high rep users just gave up on the whole system (from comments) Agreed. I think the whole voting system needs a revision. Any downvote I cast on new questions or answers without commenting about why I did that is countered within mere seconds by someone else. This happens every time, unless the ...


12

I don't believe that the threshold for upvoting should be increased. Upvotes are very important for the operation of the system for the following reasons: They encourage participation for the people answering. More upvotes means more people willing to answer a question. They help distinguish working solutions from flawed/non-working ones. You don't need to ...


49

No, there is no need to avoid hitting the vote cap. You utilizing your cap is a rarity. From an answer by Shog: That said, very few people hit the cap regularly - in the past 90 days, only 160 voters have hit the cap even once, and only one person on Stack Overflow has used 100% of their close votes every. single. day. The cap exists to prevent a small ...


18

There's a balance between providing enough information to describe your problem, and providing too much information such that it's impossible to see where the problem is. That's why one of the common close reasons contains a link to how to write a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. The two questions you point out had different flaws in them that ...


10

I don't think the community is biased against long questions. When properly composed, a very in-depth set of code, descriptions, explanations, and error results most often results in a very well received question. The problem that the community takes issue with, from my observation, are just simply massive copy paste sections of code without any real effort ...


-1

Ironically, here is a link with the answer to that question. http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66444/how-can-i-report-a-specific-bad-user Seems that you can use the "contact" button on the site to report the user. I don't think you can flag a downvote specifically, but maybe they made some other offenses that you could report to get their attention.


26

Of your 10 questions, 50% are downvoted, 30% are deleted, 20% score 0 and 20% score > 0. If you were gonna place a wager on the outcome of your next question, where would you put your money?


0

A question with 0 votes is not considered a good question and the post ban algorithm is checked when you are asking a question which means that your last question was enough to push you over the bubble.


7

You've pulled an example question from the early days of the site. What was on topic then isn't a good example of what's on topic now even if it's been upvoted a lot. However, that particular question is pretty good, even if it's a short question; many people are confused as to what metaprogramming in Python is, and this will help enlighten those who are ...



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