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8

You can't know who downvoted your question, unless the person chooses to reveal him/herself. That's intentional. However, if someone is serially downvoting your questions (goes through and downvotes several of yours in a row), it will eventually be reversed by the automatic processes. How many votes exactly define 'serial' is intentionally unknown.


8

Rather than address hypothetical voting scenarios, why not evaluate what actually happened? No downvotes on question. So far so good. No downvotes on accepted answer. Still good. No downvotes on your answer. We good? Here's the real win: not only did you get a good, informative answer to your question, but you also got valuable feedback on the answer ...


54

Yes. The downvote arrow has the following tooltip: This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful I think just posting an image and asking "how do I create this" is covered by that. If you have enough reputation it's also a good idea to vote to close (probably as "Too broad" or perhaps "It's unclear what you are ...


9

You reverse the vote by clicking the up-vote arrow again, not by clicking the down-vote arrow. Additionally, votes are locked in after about 5 minutes. If you waited for longer than that before trying to reverse the vote then the system won't allow you to change your vote (either by reversing it or changing it). The vote is unlocked when the post is ...


6

There's two questions one might ask themselves prior to writing an answer: Do I have the technical ability and time to help the author? Is this a good question for the site? Is it likely to help anyone else? Those can be mutually exclusive, and I wouldn't want to force folks to give their stamp of approval on a question where it wasn't truly earned. If ...


6

As said in comments, the checkmark doesn't mean it is the best answer. It is the answer that was most helpful to the one asking the question. Votes indicate the answer that is most useful to the community. Flagging such questions is pointless and will always get refused because of this reason. Voting bad answers down and good ones up will make the good ...


-6

Here is my idea for a compromise between the risk of tactical voting (in my eyes voting fraud if you do not go solely for content) and the wish for commitment but also the wish for flexibility. Allow changing a vote always but make it everytime weighing less and less. Simple and clean. Everytime you reverse a vote its weight is multiplied by a number ...


0

I do not agree that we should remove the lock-in. If you find yourself wanting to go back and vote a different way often, than that likely means you need to double-read the post's before voting and/or waiting longer till you vote on it. Another reason we should not remove the lock-in is because user's who rage quit, could go through all their upvotes and ...


-5

I don't think that tactical down-voting is widespread enough to limit functionality like we have, nor do I think that the inability to undo down-votes is severe enough to have a meaningful impact. I think that the vote lock is a barrier to use that we really don't need. You should take this knowing that I have only been active here since around 2012 ...


15

I'm pretty negative about this whole idea because of the opportunity for abuse. Any time we have to put our elected moderator team as the sole barrier between someone and widespread, unchecked abuse, we put a bit more strain on a system that relies heavily on distributed moderation. But there's another part that concerns me as well... I'm not convinced that ...


8

Congratulations! You recently reached the establish user privilige when your reputation crossed the 1,000 line: As part of the privilege you now have access the vote counts; clicking once on the score shows you how many up- and downvotes a post has received. The post in your screenshot has 2 downvotes, and 0 upvotes. It lets you see exactly how the score ...


3

Okay, but how could this be detected? Let's think of all the reasons someone may want to downvote you: You downvoted them You rejected an edit of theirs You flagged or closed their post You said something they disagreed with in a question, answer, comment or chat message A guy called Samuel looked at them funny once and you reminded them of it But is any ...


9

Upvotes on months-old questions are far less likely to mean "I think this question is well-researched and well-written" than they are to mean "I found this question via a Google search and I'm upvoting it because I had the same question (or I wouldn't be reading it at all)." Initial downvotes, on the other hand, largely come from people reading the front ...


12

Why did it gain views and upvotes, if it was bad, and why was it heavily downvoted, if it was good? You're asking us to explain why large groups of people don't always agree on everything. Why is there such a disagreement between upvoters and downvoters? I think the two comments left a few months after the question was posted explain that. ...


9

The Stack Overflow question reads: Is there a practical difference between the QCheckBox::toggled(bool) and QCheckBox::clicked(bool) signals? Both have the same signature, does it matter to which one I connect? Well, the commenter cost me a couple of minutes by linking to the wrong page, but I did eventually find these two references: void ...


1

I think it's a well known problem called the "meta effect". The real question for me is if and how it can be avoided. When people ask about policies and behavior here, having links to specific examples really helps. So I don't think discouraging posters from linking questions is a good solution. I think it's kind of questionable for readers of meta to ...


8

People vote because votes are important. They show the difference between good content and not-so-good content. Also, if a person asks a lot of low-quality questions (and if those questions get many downvotes), then that person gets an automatic question-ban. So voting (both upvoting and downvoting) is important, and that's why people vote. You said that ...


8

Is it accepted to downvote people who post the same answer that has been posted before by somebody else for the same question? Yes. For the simple reason that you can use your vote as you see fit. The real question though is whether or not you should vote accordingly. Let's assume we're not dealing with plagiarism here. Sometimes a question has an ...


5

It's not a very good question, at least for the current de facto community standards. Specifically: I have been trying different ways, none of them are working. If someone asked that question now it would get several "What have you tried?" and "Show us your code" comments and possibly even close votes for not showing enough effort. I don't necessarily ...


1

No, But it is OK to ask your friends to look at a question you have posted if you think they can answer it. Some of them may up vote the question, others may down vote it. I have done both when a friend has asked me to look at one of their questions.


12

We highly recommend that you not ask your friends to vote for your content simply because you were the one who left it. We do recognize that people will naturally tend to vote for people they know, and only step in when this becomes a bad enough problem that it is skewing votes on questions and answers. We even have a standard message that we send out about ...


7

Is it not acceptable to go around upvoting all of your friends' posts, no. Can we stop it...sometimes. We do what we can. Of course, sometimes the behavior isn't really distinguishable from real votes, but the mods and devs do what they can. If you suspect a particular user is committing some form of voting fraud, flag one of their posts and explain what ...


0

Developers tend to be antisocial creatures. Even if you have 100+ contacts among all the social networks you use combined, you'll probably only have a handful friends in your real life. Stack Overflow has an amount of active users that is quite more than a handful[citation needed]. I believe in nearly all cases any upvotes that are awarded based on ...


62

As has been indicated in the comments, not all removed comments are done so by moderators. If a comment contains specific words (obscenities, certain commonly abused phrases, etc.), a single "rude or offensive" flag can remove those immediately. Also, if enough members of the community get together to flag a comment, it can also be removed automatically. In ...


-20

I think he got reddit involved to boost the upvote :P Most likely some fishy stuff happening though. What were your comments specifically? Why would decent comments be deleted quickly though (seems like a glitch in system). This is another variant of the old adage - "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" I would say no need to get ...


58

It's because some of the questions/answers you've voted on have been deleted, thus giving you back your vote(s) to cast again. Votes on deleted posts do not count toward your daily allotment. [source]


2

Here's an idea. What if in addition to the up/down voting, there was a secondary quality scale with each question and answer? It would be on a fixed scale, perhaps 0 - 10, or visualized as a color gradient from red to yellow to green. Each user can vote on the quality, anywhere along the scale. In other words, instead of voting +1 or -1, I'd still do ...


1

As a pretty experienced programmer who reads much and asks little, I hate the reputation system here. I spent about an hour once trying to cruise crappy PHP questions to get some points, then gave up. I experience every little AJAX box telling me I can't upvote a good answer, and the lack of comment upvoting, as an insult. I don't use StackOverflow a ton ...


-2

Downvotes, that themselves are questionable, to questions that are well-formed and present valid issue should be explained or the voter should capable of being identified. Take for example this post Old esoteric C code. The member stumbled across and old K&R definition that he could not recognize and posted that question to SO. It was immediately ...


15

It seems you define downvote trolls as those who downvote you when you think the question is clear/good, or who provide reasons that you deem incorrect. Let's be generous here and say that you are correct in both cases. Those downvotes are not something you should flag. There is no mechanism in place for them, nor will a moderator or employee take any ...


11

It's called Alarm Fatigue. In short, notifications have to be judicious. Otherwise, they are summarily ignored.


2

What benefit would this offer you the writer of said comment? You can only delete old comments, you can't edit them and the up-vote confers no reputation. So what does knowing that 6 people "like" your comment actually achieve?



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