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23

You made the right choice! Even though a question is really old, doesn't mean it's immune from being closed. The question is now closed. If a question on the site, any question, no matter its age, is off-topic or otherwise appropriate to being closed for the current close-reasons/flag-reasons that are available at this current point in time, then you ...


7

With over 3,000 rep you can't flag as a duplicate any more. You can only vote to close. As for getting the Marshal badge, there are plenty of other things you can still actually raise flags for: spam offensive language sensitive data in posts really (and I mean really) low quality posts that should just be removed. etc


14

At some point in time the close message was replaced by one with more concise wording and a link. You can see this in your screenshot, the two messages do not match. For any post currently in the review queue with votes only for the old reason, the system cannot know that the new version is basically a variant of the old, so no highlighting is shown. This ...


10

No, we should not have a stock reason for deleting answers that have code and a terse or missing explanation. In many cases, these are good answers, and we should not be encouraging the community to blindly delete them. Also, I don't know what "closing" has to do with this, since we only close questions, not answers. This has been discussed before in ...


-8

I have been exasperated repeatedly for having legitimate questions stomped by this particular policy. Had I known SR exists, there would be no problem.


5

I'd vote to close as a duplicate if it is one. A closed question should be less detrimental to your question asking privileges. It's also the correct action, since a closed duplicate provides a link to the original question and answers. Looking through your questions, I see none that have been closed, deleted, or even downvoted in the past. With nearly 1500 ...


-2

I understand the policy, and the reasons for it. But I must admit the I would be tempted to consider as valid question asking for pros and cons or typical use cases. As far as I am concerned, I would like to know how experimented people (there are very experimented people around :-) ) actually use complex framework, if they tried some and what they think of ...


14

Looks like a childish tantrum to me. He knows the policy and he knows the reasoning. To continue fighting against it by suggesting, in private email, that you should ignore it or otherwise risk being "pitied" by this individual is mind-boggling. I suggest blacklisting the email address and ignoring henceforth.


3

A request for a resource cannot be satisfied by "describe the problem and what has been to solve it". That is a ridiculous response. It does not appear to have occurred to our friend that the incongruity is produced not by any unsuitability of the answer, but by that of the question.


5

The "no recommendation questions" policy may be imperfect, but almost all of them are problematic and need to be closed because they attract spam and promotion to an extent that defies intuition and everything close to common sense. Especially that question. It's total crap and it's exactly the sort of thing that the policy exists to control. Not only ...


89

I must say I'm surprised you are willing participate in shutting down questions like this. SO's policy of denying requests for tools is, IMHO, outright stupid, and makes SO that much less useful. (The existence of SR is acknowledgement this is stupid). Well, we didn't just make this policy up out of nothing. We arrived at it based on evidence. Questions ...


57

This guy's been warned repeatedly about his behaviour—I believe that he had to edit hundreds of answers to remove links to his company to avoid being booted off the site entirely in the past. Frankly, if he has a problem with the site's policy, he should bring it up on Meta, where he can be as totally ignored as everybody else, and certainly not ...


2

One counterargument to the simple "yes, it helps them learn": downvoting alone doesn't help people learn, at least not efficiently. The space of "bad questions" is enormous, and if a new user is asking a question you don't think is good, it probably means that they don't know how to ask a good one. Downvoting as a part of teaching new users makes total ...


15

I've removed the flag, which should correct the immediate problem here. Long-term, we probably shouldn't be displaying this notice in response to close flags. Unlike close votes, close flags cannot be retracted and don't age away - the flagger can delete the comment that indicates the duplicate (as was done in this case), but the flag (and notice) will ...


4

Stack Overflow has come to a point where a developer not knowing about it is as absurd as a regular person not knowing about Facebook or Google. That said, I understand that societies nowadays tolerate more and more people who do not RTFM take the time to read some quick, introductory guide on how to use a system (i.e.: ...


14

Yes, it is reasonable to expect new users to follow the rules from the very start. Just like all other communities. Where you live, are new car drivers allowed to exceed the speed limit? There are many first posts from SO users that have been up voted, favourited and have many views, so it is entirely possible to follow the rules from the start. The rules ...


18

Flagging/close voting for content problems is always appropriate for a question that is off-topic, too vague etc, whether the user is a first posting newbie or a five year SO veteran. Same for downvoting - although I personally tend to give new users a bit more leeway, especially for questions that show at least an attempt at being good. I leave a comment ...


125

Yes. It's perfectly fine to vote down/close/flag new user's first question. And you should do so if the question deserves it. If it was my first time playing in a basketball game, should I not be given a technical foul for punching someone in the face? Rules have to be followed regardless of the players/users experience. I do agree that rude comments ...


4

If the question is un-salvageable then it should be deleted. However, this can have consequences for the the OP as deleted questions contribute to the automatic question ban - though down-voted ones do too so if it's down-voted anyway deleting isn't going to make much difference. If the question is salvageable then it should be edited. This can be done by ...


5

In the general case the close reason is chosen by a simple majority so if two users vote for "too broad" and the other three vote for "unclear" the question will be marked as "unclear". For migrations a super majority of four votes for the target site are required. This is to help prevent poor quality questions being migrated. So in your case with three ...


4

There are over 3.4 million registered users on Stack Overflow. Not all of them will agree on what should be closed and deleted, and what shouldn't. Closing a low-quality question is an intermediary step that provides the original poster (or another altruist user) an opportunity to possibly improve the question and save it (or to just plain reopen it if it ...


4

What makes these questions deserving of higher priority than the rest of the off-topic questions? If we're gonna build a queue / UI for one particular off-topic reason, it'd better be a real urgent threat to the site... And I'm not really convinced that "recommendation questions" fit the bill there. Yeah, there are some pretty nasty ones, but a lot of them ...


3

As stated in the help center, users gain the privilege to vote to close (and reopen) questions when they reach 3000 reputation. As mentioned in the comments, editing a closed question will place it in the reopen review queue, where other 3000+ rep users can either vote to reopen the question, or kick it out of the review queue in its closed state by marking ...


0

You’re supposed to comment, explaining the misconception and why it shouldn’t be closed. If you’re convincing enough, there will be no more close votes, and the existing close votes will either expire or be retracted. If it does get closed, you can vote to reopen and hopefully the comment will convince others to do the same.


7

I was one of the ones who originally voted to close. It was a question nakedly asking for code and I have always been under the impression that such questions, without any demonstration of an effort to write the code themself, is off-topic. For reference, here's the original version of the question: I'm looking for a sample on how to configure and ...


15

I agree with you; I don’t think the current close votes are valid. Indeed, there are two things that could have been interpreted as an off-site resource: The ‘input’: You’re using some external library. I don’t see this as a big deal; there’s plenty of nonstandard libraries being used, but I don’t see anyone calling a witch-hunt on boost. The ‘output’: ...


23

Let me pick apart your question in (almost) reverse order. Therefore I feel the only solution is to abolish the right to close questions altogether. What do you think? What do I think? I think that you haven't put a lot of thought into your question. A question that is closed is still there for everyone to see, you simply can't add new answers to ...


11

Closed questions If you feel that a question should not be closed, you personally have enough reputation to vote to reopen them. You can even choose to start a Meta discussion to explain why you think the question should be reopened. Another option besides beginning a Meta discussion is to speak with some users in a chat room about the question. Be warned, ...


1

You have stumbled across the funny nature of the "Off-topic" close reasons. Normally close votes are not broken out by type. 4 votes for "Unclear what you are asking" and 1 vote for "Too Broad" will be displayed as all 5 votes as "Unclear". This is how the close system works, although there are feature requests on MSE to change this behavior. However, ...


4

There is no special provision for the owner of the post, no. Your vote carries the same weight as any other close vote. Closing a post removes the ability for (more) people to answer, letting the owner of the question insta-close can be open to abuse. Letting the owner vote like everyone else is then the next best option.


14

If the new question is better written than the original and has a better answer than the original then you might want to consider closing the older question as a duplicate of the newer one. If the new question doesn't have an answer but the original has a near perfect one you could flag the post using the "other" option for a moderator to close and merge the ...


31

It should be closed as a duplicate, if that's what it is, and the duplicate question answers his question. As for voting, at the end of the day that's up to you. Do you believe that the post was actually useful and helpful? I personally think that it doesn't matter how well written a post is, if they didn't even take the time to throw their question ...



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