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2

Done. I made iads a synonym of the main iad, and cleaned up a few questions that were improperly tagged.


2

While CIL is the proper technical term, it doesn't get much actual usage in practice. Certainly not in answers, most everybody uses IL. At least partly inspired by the tools that work with IL, their names start with il (like ilasm and ildasm). The only reason the cil tag has more posts is because somebody once made msil a synonym for it. The predecessor ...


1

I would just burn the hell out of all those tags. The history of html elements tags has been very unsuccessful. Most users would just add the tag because their markup has it, not because they have a specific problem using the element. Just check the history of div, a, span, etc., you will be scared.


0

One thing that users with a net score of at least five in the tag can do, is vote on the suggested synonyms.


1

Not sure when, but this has been completed. http://stackoverflow.com/tags/sequelize.js/info


1

The majority of what I see revolves around meeting requests, so I would vote to keep meeting-request and alias meeting to it. Meeting Request is more descriptive and tells the whole story. Just "meeting" can get stuck to things that tend to be off-topic (i.e. your first link). The wiki page for meeting-request should be generic enough to not limit itself to ...


1

I am not sure that "merging" tags are good idea. Please read this post and read the answer by Gilles: http://meta.stackexchange.com/a/216593/233438. The OP wanted the tags exist and existdb to merge; however, if you merge both into the desired tag of existdb, some other user at a later point in time will try and create the ambiguous tag, exist again. Sine ...


13

Done, and merged. There's no reason (as you said) for jQuery to have its own version of it, when it behaves in the same manner everywhere. And bless you for looking at synonyms that you could vote on and care about.


8

There are two concepts here. On one hand there are "assert commands" (or "assert statements" if you prefer) such as are found in Euclid, Java, and Eiffel. These are commands in an imperative language. Closely related is C's "assert macro" and "assert" subroutines found in lots of libraries. These assert commands, macros, and subroutines are used for ...



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