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1

You can see your suggested edits on your profile, under the Activity tab. http://stackoverflow.com/users/2555778/jonan?tab=activity&sort=suggestions


3

As far as I am concerned, the question is about a problem the user is experiencing while trying to implement a profanity filter system. That said, I do not see any reason he should post the aforementioned profanity words on SO. The question can basically be reworded as "how can I replace a word with another", so even asking "how to replace 'apples' with ...


3

No, it is not acceptable. You shouldn't have accepted the edit as it changes the original answer. Expletives are not acceptable behavior on SE, but in this case, by removing them you're changing the original meaning of post. Excessive enforcing is bad, and I don't think this edit shoud've been approved. If you really want to remove them, you should remove ...


5

Questions closed as duplicates generally stay around to act as searching sign-posts. They are not automatically deleted, as a rule. If the edit is useful and improves the post, approve it.


10

Treat it like you would any other suggested edit: if it improves the question, approve it, and if it changes the meaning of its content, or makes it worse, reject it.


2

The page you are taken to when you click on the notification will take you to the page to approve an edit. If you don't have an option to approve or reject the edit, then it most likely has already been acted on by the time you saw the notification.


1

If it's suggested and you're not reviewing in a queue (therefore have already read the question, aren't trying to get a lot of reviews done etc.) I would probably improve it then mark the review as unhelpful. This is an educational opportunity for the suggested editor, and IIRC you can leave a comment explaining why though a "correct" edit it was unhelpful, ...


10

Edits should fix things. Typos, bad grammar, bad punctuation, misformmatted code, numbered lists that didn't come out right, and excess chattiness should all be fixed. The too minor reason doesn't refer to the fact that a change is unimportant so much as it does to you left things unfixed. Some people, perhaps on a campaign for rep from suggested edits, ...


4

There is a "rollback" option that you can use on the revision history of any question to roll back an edit that you feel was actively harmful. Note that edits that are too minor, but not actively harmful generally shouldn't be rolled back. While they should be rejected at first, rolling back an excessively minor edit is just as bad as making an excessively ...


3

You can check how many edits are needed before you can get the editing badges using this Data Explorer query. In your particular case, it looks like a few of your edits were to the same post multiple times. According to waffles's post on the subject: Strunk & White and Copy Editor now only count posts, provided: The post is not deleted You ...


1

I don’t know of a way to determine how each of them are of each type, but you can see a list of your edits under the revisions sub-tab of the activity tab of your profile.


6

They can be OK; but they should be very relevant, and not spammy in nature. Just adding in a link to some random website that happens to mention the topic generally smells a lot to me. I tend only to approve such edits when they are linking to a canonical, authoritative reference. From a vendor or official support area, for example. In the specific case ...


2

I wrote a small JavaScript code that when put into the browser console and executed, will bring up the summary of your review decisions on the current site. It crawls the reviews in your activity, starting from the first page and count how many of each review "type" e.g. Approve, Reject, Edit etc you got, then continue to the next page. OK, so the code ...


6

We've gone a few steps further here and removed all of the triggers that automatically convert a post to community wiki. Now, no edits, be they improvements or otherwise, will cause this to happen. Instead, flags are raised when a post reaches certain thresholds. In the case of multiple editors, we've raised the threshold to 10. Improving does still count ...


13

This was your suggestion, which had this edit reason: please don't ask another question; in the same question. Now that really doesn't make it obvious to reviewers what you're doing. To them, it really looks like you are the one completely changing the question. In the future, try more descriptive reasons to tell people exactly what is changing: ...


20

For the most part, you don't have to do anything other than reject the edits as spam if they have not yet been rejected by others in the community. This will train our spam layer on the origins of the abusive edits, and the noise will soon stop. Don't lessen the quality of your answer to try and stop this, we have a system in place so that it's not ...


3

As shown here, reputation from suggested edits maxes out at 1,000 rep. You have suggested (and got approved) upwards of 500 edits (at +2 apiece), as shown by this page (2K+). In fact, you have 571 approved edits at the time of this writing. You stopped earning rep from edits once the 500th suggested edit became approved. Community Wiki from Qantas 94 Heavy ...


2

If you spot answers that you'd like to make significant changes to the code in, instead of sliding an edit in, point out the issue in a comment. If you point it out in a comment: You give the OP an opportunity to clarify whether you are justified or not (perhaps you were mistaken, it happens). By suggesting that in a comment, you'd give the OP the ...


16

If you're wondering why this edit was rejected, it's just because another user with full editing privileges edited at the same time as you. However, most of your other edits do a lot more than formatting. They change the code (fixing errors in the code, adding more code, etc.), which shouldn't be done in an edit. Instead, comment and say: Hey, you need ...


8

There appears to be some confusion here on just how edits work as what you are describing is not possible, Edits you make to your own post (while logged in of course) never require review. As the original author you will retain full edit rights to that post as long as it is there. This means your edits will never be rejected With the privilege mentioned ...


4

Rejecting was the correct action here, because the edit is actually meant as a comment to the answer. Commenting would be better than suggesting an edit, but the editor suggested an edit because he doesn't have enough rep for commenting.


3

Annoying answer: it depends. Somewhat more specific answer: it depends if the question could ever be salvaged and if this edit moves it in that direction. Editing spam, completely off topic questions etc If the question clearly shouldn't be here then there isn't much point editing it, we don't want people making perfectly grammatically correct spam. ...


9

I would rather have the choice be made prior to the decision to edit: So if you click the new Reject and Edit the edit is deemed not useful. If you click improve, it is. I always found it odd that we click 'Improve' to totally disregard the previous edit. This will make it a lot easier for the person doing the review to look at the edit, decide if ...


12

I agree that it makes it less of a decision process. However, you would encounter a similar issue with keeping it unticked, making it harder for new users with helpful edits to gain reputation! As a suggestion, what if we left the choice to whether or not the edit was helpful/unhelpful to the submit button? It'd look something like this (only better): It ...


6

Ok, two points. That suggested edit changed too much. 90% of the answer is new. The edit should have been rejected. But, well, it was approved. And your name is attached to it. Are you happy with it? Leave it alone. Not so much? Roll it back. I wish this sort of thing didn't happen, but it happens all the time. Approval seems to be the default response to ...


2

No. I don't think an edit should completely change the context of the answer. That edit completely changed the quality, and context of the answer to a degree that is so extreme it should not have been approved.


1

The edit was approved because three of the five reviewers approved. The process is democratic, and should be subjective/qualitative, but unfortunately we have a lot of robo-reviewers in the system who care a lot more about rep/badges than quality. Thankfully, edits that ultimately get approved but shouldn't, can still be rolled back (or important ...


6

example.com is now the "preferred" example domain and should be used over other domains. Well, it's been the "preferred" example domain for well over a decade, predating Stack Overflow by a fair bit. Regardless, you really don't need a special rule for these. Does the edit make the post better? Easier to understand? Then approve it. Is it making the ...


3

I would reject them. If this automatic thoughtless edit was considered worthwhile then a script would have been run on the database to do this change. The lack of such a script shows that the change does not have much benefit.


6

Shog9's answer, http://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/207155/244933, specifically says that he has blacklisted "site.com". Thus, while it seems to be minor change, it shouldn't be rejected as too minor.


9

Based on your edit, it appears that you have 200 tag wiki edits that are all filling up the queue. In the short term, you might want to get a mod to just zip through the queue if possible and create at least some space. You may also need to temporarily decrease the rep requirement for the permission to review tag wiki edits, so that other higher reputation ...


15

I banned you manually from review for 7 days after seeing this review: http://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/4409783 (along with the others involved there). You allowed obvious vandalism to be approved, which should never happen. This was another questionable recent review: http://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/4393397 Unfortunately, the ...


14

…something is obviously wrong The URL you're using! You were looking for suggested edit 723477, not review item 723477 which happens to be a suggested edit. It's a little confusing, but suggested edits existed before the whole concept of the review queues, so they have a identity all of their own. Note that Data Explorer does have a [Suggested ...


8

I agree with the spirit of your suggestion, but there is a rampant problem with "robo-reviewers" approving anything they come across. Because there is currently no locking mechanism, a good reviewer taking the time to explain a rejection may lead to the edit getting approved in the meantime.


4

It's best to leave it at the discretion of the edit change reviewer. An example of a good tag edit: when an OP incorrectly tags a question as C and / or C++, or omits the language altogether. A user who examines the question carefully and adds relevant tags has made an effective contribution: well deserving of +2 reputation if eligible. (As for your ...


8

This makes for an interesting case study on the behavior of suggested edit reviewers. Yes, this edit was pointless - it amounts to little more than a fresh coat of paint on a sinking ship. It is clearly an improvement to the original - just far, far too little to really help. Identifying the criteria needed to reject the edit requires more effort than ...



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