Hot answers tagged

96

To expand on Flexo's answer, let's take a closer look at what the specific suggested edit actually changed: It added backticks around the words "Service", "Court" and "Machine" in this sentence: I have abstract class (Service) with two derived classes (Court and Machine). These words are (presumably) class names, which are a bit of a borderline case: ...


87

Yes, edits that significantly improve a post are always welcome! That improvement can come either by way of fixing formatting, correcting spelling/grammar mistakes, clarifying a title, and adding omitted tags. A good edit will fix all of the problems with a post. If there are both formatting and grammar problems, for example, then you need to fix both of ...


83

Commenting that the link is broken isn't especially helpful, and this community has a long and lovely history of editing others' posts to improve them. That is part of the social contract of posting on Stack Exchange - your content is subject to editing by others, who hopefully seek to improve and maintain it. Broken hyperlinks are a pervasive problem, ...


82

If this kind of thing is found in an answer, fix it without hesitation!! I know some people are insistent upon some kind of golden rule that edits should never touch code, but that's stupid. Code isn't any more sacred than words are. The whole point of collaborative editing is that none of us is as smart as all of us. I regularly fat-finger code snippets in ...


78

You have to take each case on its own merits. When a suggested edit is just updating an hyperlink I'd be thinking to check the following: Is the original link dead or pointing at completely incorrect information (i.e. the site's been taken over by someone else)? If so then I'd be more inclined to accept the edit. Does the new link point to an incorrect or ...


67

It's actually NOT obvious that your change is correct - at least, not without further changes. You corrected the argument to getString() to be a proper XPath expression... However, a cursory scan of the documentation indicates that the default logic used to evaluate these expressions is not XPath! It's merely... XPath-like. If you want to actually use ...


59

A lot of red flags came up for me. Here's why: There's a lot of new information It's being added in as if you had said it You yourself said that you didn't know if it worked To be blunt, the third reason would be enough to reject it, but from an outsider's standpoint, 1 and 2 are good reasons to reject it outright. If they want to add that information, ...


58

After reading your explanation I think your edit makes sense and should have been accepted. However, you should consider that to someone who is not a native (nor an expert) English speaker it really looks like you are being pedantic, and possibly fighting some British-English vs American-English war (like "grey" instead of "gray"), which is not encouraged. ...


54

I mentioned this in comments already, but worth elaborating on it a bit... The most immediate way to stop a bad editor is to educate them in the context of a bad edit. There are two convenient ways to do this: Reject the edit. If there are bad edits still pending review and you reject them, the editor will be warned the next time he goes to edit. Don't ...


52

I'm strongly in favour of edits like this. Syntax highlighting, tab-size consistency and wrapping to avoid horizontal scrolling can make a significant difference to the legibility of a code sample — especially for users with visual acuity difficulties (like me!). Similarly, fixing typos can make it much easier for users (not all of whom are first-language ...


52

If you see someone with a pattern of spamming harmful or completely irrelevant edits, it's fine to raise a custom moderator flag and point this out. It's probably best to include links to a sampling of the worst edits so that we can quickly pull them up and judge if there's a problem. If this is an issue, moderators can now manually ban people from ...


51

The edit seems to largely introduce backticks, which are used for code markup for things that aren't code. That's wrong and makes the post worse, not better.


47

DO NOT TOUCH THEM. Imports should be considered as part of the OP's code irrespective of whether they are actually being used or not. I have seen several questions raised by an OP only to find out that he was using the wrong class / package. Keeping the OP's code as it is can help us in reproducing the issue quite quickly (by just copy-pasting code. And no,...


45

All three edits are of questionable quality and should not have been approved. As explained in When should code formatting be used for non-code text?, inline code is not to be used to highlight random terms in a post. It actively harms readability, just as obsessive usage of bold text to highlight parts the author finds interesting.


45

Here's the long and the short of it... Having the complete example in a snippet can be helpful. Third party sites go down etc. etc... In cases where there's a lot of extraneous code or filler content you can, and sometimes should, include a collapsed snippet like this: Example js: console.log('made you look'); // be sure to show the relevant stuff just ...


44

Sometimes robo reviewers mess things up. I'm not sure why three people failed to approve that, but they did. Your edit comment was pretty clear, so I can't even complain about that like normal. I'm honestly surprised that that much of a diff didn't force people to slow down and take their time with the review. The allcaps, bold SOLUTION definitely does ...


44

Given that some of these edits even applied the wrong capitalization for terms, I'd say you're safe to reject most of them. Converting a clearly written title into titlecase is unnecessary, and may in fact make the question harder to read. Question titles don't need to be titlecase, and usually aren't on Stack Exchange sites.


43

I rejected some of his edits, but what else am I supposed to do about this? Continue like that. Evaluate each edit in isolation. Approve if the edit is good, improve if it can be improved, reject if it's detrimental to the post and reject and edit if you feel that the post needs another kind of work. I read before that SO very strongly discourages sub ...


42

Ideally you should have made all the edits on one go, but both your edits were deemed to be useful so you got the +2 for each. There's nothing wrong with this and to change the system so you only could get one +2 per post would probably be far too complicated for the actual benefit (if indeed there was a benefit) that it would bring. The only thing I can ...


40

For better or worse, reviewers don't tend to do a lot of research when they approve/reject edits. I certainly wouldn't expect them to magically divine all the research you've done personally, or the experience you're bringing to the table with your edit. For an edit that's rather substantial like this, but appears valid, you should explain it in the edit ...


40

There are some guidelines under each reason in the reject dialog. no improvement whatsoever This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability. causes harm Describe how this edit would make the post ...


39

The rule is simple: Improve whatever needs improvement. If the only improvement that should be done is in the title, go ahead and edit it, even if it's only one character; However, if the post contains other errors (formation, spelling, bad indentation, etc) you shouldn't only fix that typo in the title, but rather try to edit everything (that what makes ...


39

Until you reach 20K reputation (trusted user), any tag wiki or wiki excerpt you edit is an edit suggestion. It even enters the suggested edit queue and is reviewable by people with 5K+ reputation. The only requirement for rep on suggested edits from the help page is suggested edit is accepted: +2 (up to +1000 total per user) So as long as you did not ...


39

I've contacted the user in question and asked them to stop making huge numbers of minor edits. Let me know if they continue. I'll let the edits that are already in the queue be reviewed naturally.


37

Ok, as the user who rejected the edit, here's a few points, not all totally correct but which I have corrected: First line of edit is removal of 'in Tcl' and I am one of those who don't like to see 'in XXX' (where XXX is a language), and most particularly on Questions with only one tag. The single tag should make it obvious that the problem is within that ...


34

This edit is probably not the result of a machine, but of an actual human being. Someone formatted random words which are reserved words in Java but in this case they were not used as Java code. Humans should be able to recognize this little difference, instead, it looks more like machine-generated formatting to me. Humans should be able to recognize ...


34

You mean like this suggestion? If you click in the markdown diff, you'll notice the suggestions add an HTML comment for syntax highlighting. That by itself is not the most useful thing in the world, but it is potentially a minor improvement. I personally think it's not enough of an improvement; I think it fits the "No improvement/superfluous" rejection ...


32

There are certainly advantages to a system that gives you less oversight for specific tasks as you demonstrate more proficiency in performing those tasks. If Stack Overflow had been designed with suggested edits in place from day one, it is plausible that this is the system that would have been used. However, there are downsides to this as well, and they're ...


32

I agree with the reviewers on the first post. You removed some of the CSS code. You may have thought it was irrelevant or erroneously included, but in my opinion, that's not a judgement the editor should make; it definitely changes the meaning of the post. I would also reject the second case, but for the same reason: it changes the meaning of the post. ...


31

Comment you've added to the review - "Make this question correct and more SEO friendly" is not exactly useful. "Correct" does not mean much and changing "thread" to "process" for the sake of SEO definitely deserves rejection. More specific comment like: "OP used 'thread' as synonym of 'sub-process' which not the case for 'bash'" would likely yield more ...



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